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How should I apply paper backing to raw veneer?

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Forum topic by William Shelley posted 12-04-2016 08:29 PM 453 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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William Shelley

477 posts in 1304 days


12-04-2016 08:29 PM

Hi all,

I have a number of sheets of raw wood burl veneer, and an initial attempt to cut the veneer for inlay/marquetry resulted in a lot of frustration and loss of small details where the cuts were going across the grain.

I did some reading and found that i should be using paper-backed veneer. What would be the best way to apply paper to my existing veneer before attempting to cut or work with it again?

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective


5 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2328 days


#1 posted 12-04-2016 08:39 PM

I wouldn’t try to do that. It might work, but you’d have to find the right paper and it would be a mess to do. Paper backed veneer is something you buy that way, and normally it requires the use of contact cement to apply. Some of it is PSA (peel and stick) but I doubt that’s what you need. I’ve never done inlays (or marwuetry) with veneer but the demos I’ve seen all used raw veneer.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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JAAune

1769 posts in 2151 days


#2 posted 12-04-2016 08:55 PM

A better idea is to simply apply a layer of tape to one side of the veneer while working it. Veneer gum tape works but normally I use the economy version of Duck brand masking tape. The tape gets removed after the veneer is glued to the substrate.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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shipwright

7779 posts in 2633 days


#3 posted 12-05-2016 12:13 AM

The standard method used for a couple of hundred years by marqueteur’s has been to apply paper (newsprint works best) to the show side of the raw veneer prior to cutting the marquetry. This helps keep all the fine detail in the small pieces from breaking off.
The method is to apply hot hide glue to the veneer, apply the paper, and then brush with a soft brush. I use a nail brush and it works very well.
After the marquetry is cut it is assembled on an assembly board in french marquetry or on tape or sticky paper elsewhere, paper side down with the colours showing. Glue is applied to the substrate and the whole assembled motif is pressed onto it. After the glue has cured the paper (or tape and paper) is removed from the show face with water.
JAAune’s suggestion of using veneer tape is almost the same thing as veneer tape is simply paper with animal protien glue on it. It is however more costly and more time consuming than HHG and newsprint if you do much marquetry.
In my opinion masking tape is a poor substitute if you saw your marquetry as it has a soft adhesive that will gum up the cuts and the blade. It may work better for knife marquetry but it will not hold very fine detail like a hard glue will.
It also will not hold up well during sand shading.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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shipwright

7779 posts in 2633 days


#4 posted 12-05-2016 12:29 AM

BTW commercial paper backed veneer is way too thin to use for inlay or marquetry. You are on the right track with raw veneer, you just need to paper reinforce it. Even most commercial raw veneer these days is only 1/42” thick. The stuff on the paper backing is much thinner than that.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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JAAune

1769 posts in 2151 days


#5 posted 12-05-2016 12:48 AM


In my opinion masking tape is a poor substitute if you saw your marquetry as it has a soft adhesive that will gum up the cuts and the blade. It may work better for knife marquetry but it will not hold very fine detail like a hard glue will.
It also will not hold up well during sand shading.

- shipwright

Yeah, I don’t saw or sand shade. Most of my veneer work is more along the line of geometric patterns that don’t require the 3D pop of shading. All cutting is done with a razor or a laser depending upon the level of complexity. I also avoid the use of water because much of what I do needs to be cut precisely to size prior to gluing and too much movement can ruin a piece.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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