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Forum topic by John Steffen posted 08-02-2010 05:02 PM 1370 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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John Steffen

218 posts in 2523 days


08-02-2010 05:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question nailer dewalt

Yes please.

There are a few projects I have coming up that would make great use of a power nailer. One of those projects being trimming the replacement windows on my 3 story home (two floors and 4 windows in the attic). I would really like to have one that doesn’t require lugging a compressor… Not that I have a compressor to lug, but you get the idea.

So, I’m balls-deep in the DeWalt 18V system, and figure that would be a good place to start looking for a battery powered nailer.

Here’s the point where I say that I have no idea of anything about power nailers, or nailing in general.

What am I looking for in a nailer? I will use it for mostly trimming the windows, and some crown molding/base boards.

DeWalt has 4 I’m looking at:
DC608K – 2” 18 Gauge Brad Nailer
DC628K – 1-1/4” – 2-1/2” 15 Gauge 34° Angled Finish Nailer Kit
DC616K – 1-1/4” – 2-1/2” 16 Gauge Straight Finish Nailer Kit
DC618K – 1-1/4” – 2-1/2” 16 Gauge 20° Angled Finish Nailer Kit

I’m guessing I don’t want the Brad Nailer… But do I want 15 or 16 gauge? What’s the benefit of having angle loading? Where did I leave my pants?

-- Big John's Woodshed - Farmington, IL


13 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3116 days


#1 posted 08-02-2010 05:24 PM

angle nailers are good for situation where you have to nail at an angle and you have walls/floor to accommodate for that otherwise would be impossible to reach with the straight magazine in the way. Also it is mostly better balanced to hold.

That said – here’s my point on 18V:
I had a 18v dewalt set for a while as I was an electrical contractor and used it daily. Esp. with NiCad and NiMh unless these are used daily, and recharged on a regular bases (at least once every few days), those batteries will die quickly and won’t take/hold a charge anymore. even Li Ion – which are by far better, need periodical discharge/charge to keep them in good shape.

So – if you are a finish contractor – having those battery operated nailers could be a great save on the compressor, and weight, but if this is a one-of job – you are probably better off in the long run with a compressor nailer – for finishing you don’t need a huge compressor , and the compressor can be used for other things later on as well (cleanup, filling air, nailers, etc).

just my $0.02

I have 4 dead 18V yellow batteries that I can’t use anymore after not using them for ~2 years… that’s $200-$400 paper weights

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View spclPatrolGroup's profile

spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2362 days


#2 posted 08-02-2010 05:32 PM

15 GA would be too beefy to use on trim, the nails dont really come much less than 2”, which is overkill for a 3/8-1/2” trimboard

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1984 posts in 2932 days


#3 posted 08-02-2010 05:47 PM

Brad nails are more than adequate to hold trim securely, including base board. The fasteners are much cheaper and easier to find.
One of the main things to look at in a nailer is the availability of fasteners. Really sucks if you have to order nails by mail instead of just picking them up in varied lengths.
I have found the cost of the nailer is usually about the same or a little less than a full set of nails. That’s a large box of all lengths available. I’ve used several brands but by no means the majority of brands available. They all pretty much performed the same. If it’s a full time use tool I would push some extra budget that way but for occasional use, mid range to entry level is fine.
Like PurpLev said, in the long run, the compressor style may be the best bet.
There are several kits available that have a small pancake compressor and two or three nailers with them in a kit. I believe Bostich has a couple of kits on the market and they have always been a good brand. I don’t know who makes the compressor but it’s light and cheap.
Hope this helps, BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#4 posted 08-02-2010 06:30 PM

I would encourage you to rethink your position on an air based nailer. You do not need a big or expensive compressor. My little Husky does just fine and it is light weight with wheels and a handle for pulling. Very convenient. I don’t remember what it costs, but it was less than $100.

My Bostitch 18 guage brad nailer would be perfectly adequate for what you need. If this is a one time job or you will use your nailer seldom, there are very cheap models available.

You’ll find that the compressor is handy to have for other applications. I just pumped up my basketball this morning.

FYI – I also have a 15 guage angled finishing nailer. It would be severe overkill for what you are doing, but wow is it powerful.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2948 days


#5 posted 08-02-2010 10:42 PM

I happen to have all Bostitch nailers. I find for trim work, that an angled nailer (mine is a 16 ga) and a brad nailer do well. If you dont use the nailers regularly you can get by with an inexpensive compressor…even a pancake compressor will work fine if you choose to buy a trim air nailer.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View John Steffen's profile

John Steffen

218 posts in 2523 days


#6 posted 08-02-2010 10:48 PM

okay, you guys have me convinced about the air nailers. My question now; how much compressor should I get? I was wanting to hold out until I could get a good sized one (30+ gallon) but I’m not sure if that will happen in any short timeframe. I would want to be able to use it for more than just the occasional nail job and I don’t really want it to take 10 minutes to fill. I have a 1gallon Cambell Hausfeld that I bought on Black Friday for $50 and it barely has enough unf to fill up bike tires. Can I get by with that? Should I get a 6 gallon pancake? There are several kits (6 gallon pancake + nailer(s)) under $300, and I was going to pay 200-300 for the battery nailer.

Any thoughts?

-- Big John's Woodshed - Farmington, IL

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51452 posts in 2948 days


#7 posted 08-02-2010 11:24 PM

They often sell a nailer/pancake compressor combo at HD or Lowes. I have seen these set ups in either Porter Cable, or Bostitch. Three nailers and the compressor for a reasonable price. The pancake compressor will drive most nailers. If you are going to use it for something that takes continuous air like a sprayer, or air wrench, you might want to get something a bit larger. I have a double tank Bostitch which works good for any air nailers, filling tires, air wrenchs etc. I havent tried it with a paint sprayer. I am glad its portable though so I can take it to job sites.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#8 posted 08-02-2010 11:26 PM

My 1.5 gallon Husky Scout is all the compressor you will need for a nailer. This compressor is particularly easy to move around with wheels and a handle that comes out.

http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware-Air-Compressors-Tools-Accessories/Husky/h_d1/N-5yc1vZb8mrZrdZ1xit/R-100645228/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

If this is an option, I would recommend getting a nailer and trying it on your Campbell Hausfeld. If it works – great. If it does not, buy something else.

These smaller compressors usually come with a coiled 25’ plastic hose that you can’t stretch out more than about 15’. I’d recommend upgrading the hose.

Even if you get a bigger compressor later, the small compressor will probably be your first choice most times. It’s very portable and you are up to full pressure quickly. I sold my 60 gallon compressor after buying this Husky.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View spclPatrolGroup's profile

spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2362 days


#9 posted 08-02-2010 11:43 PM

I have a 4 gallon craftsman with a max PSI of 125, it powers my 15 GA and 18 GA nailers well. If you want to spray fnishes you may want to go bigger on the tank, the main thing is to look at what PSI you need to operate your nailers, usually thats between 80-100lbs and make sure your compresser can hanle it.

View MarkwithaK's profile

MarkwithaK

370 posts in 2646 days


#10 posted 08-03-2010 03:45 AM

I went with the PC compressor/nailer combo….Pretty happy with it.

-- If at first you don't succeed then maybe skydiving isn't for you.

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1984 posts in 2932 days


#11 posted 08-03-2010 05:55 PM

I don’t have one, but I would lean toward the Bostich. I say this because I looked at the PC line after Black and Decker bought them out and reissued the line. Looked and felt like the junk I would associate with B and D. Lighter weight, cheap plastic housing, etc etc.
Good luck, BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View Mark Miller's profile

Mark Miller

58 posts in 2632 days


#12 posted 08-03-2010 09:52 PM

I used a single tank very portable compressor I think it is a 2-5 gallon one and a 18 ga. nailer, if you only want it for light stuff you should be able to get both for less than $100. After a few years I bought a larger one for my shop I built because I bought a framing nailer to build my shop with so I needed a bigger compressor. PS you know that if you buy a bigger compressor you will have this big desire to buy bigger air tools.

Mark

-- www.markscreativeturnings.ca

View RedShirt013's profile

RedShirt013

219 posts in 3130 days


#13 posted 08-03-2010 11:14 PM

If you ar going to get a bigger compressor later and need one that’s very portable now, you could look at getting a Jet Pak (those small CO2 cylinder with a regulator). I probably spelled it wrong, but somebody reviewed it on LJ before

-- Ed

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