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Which plywood blade and TPI

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Forum topic by WoodNuts posted 08-02-2010 04:51 PM 1349 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodNuts

74 posts in 2410 days


08-02-2010 04:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip milling

My plan is to cut full sheetgoods atop a 1” thick insulation foam board, make my mark, set my veritas Power Tool Guide in place and rip it.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=41707&cat=1,240,45313&ap=1

Should provide an accurate and clean cut every time. I have a plain PC 7 1/4” and with a 40TPI blade like frued, should yield great results.

I do plan on taking a slight 1/16th initial pass followed by full depth.

Question: What TPI blades are you all using? Is there a significant improvement from the 40 to the 60 TPI, or even 60-80 TPI? Prices are 15/20/50 dollars respectively. Maybe best of both ends from 40-80 would be the 60TPI.

What do you all think?

-- ...there's a fix fer dat...


6 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

8242 posts in 2890 days


#1 posted 08-02-2010 05:00 PM

I use a 40 TPI made by Tenryu specifically for plywood. My shop made guide provides zero clearance on the “good” side of the cut. In hardwood plywood, there is no chip out.
IMHO, a 60 TPI is a waste of $. A scoring cut may be a good idea, but I have never found it necessary.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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knotscott

7210 posts in 2837 days


#2 posted 08-02-2010 05:32 PM

As important, if not more important than tooth count is the tooth grind. A Hi-ATB grind has the lowest tendencies for tearout. Freud has a new 60T Hi-ATB that should do nicely, but if you’re not up to spending the bucks, their Diablo D0740X (are any quality) 40T ATB should do well too for ~ $15.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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CoolDavion

426 posts in 3286 days


#3 posted 08-05-2010 07:11 PM

One thing I found that helped me , along with the insulation trick.
I took a roll of the plastic carpet protector, chopped it into roughly 2” rolls. Then I wrapped the line I was going to cut (on both sides) with tape and pressed it down. The tape helped to support the veneer and prevent chipping.

-- Do or do not, there is no try!

View Gene Howe's profile (online now)

Gene Howe

8242 posts in 2890 days


#4 posted 08-06-2010 01:12 AM

CoolDavion,
I understand the tape. But the plastic carpet protector has me baffled. It’s purpose is??

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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CoolDavion

426 posts in 3286 days


#5 posted 08-07-2010 04:03 PM

@Gene
I used the carpet protector as “tape”. I tried what I had, masking tape, blue paint tape, some other plastic tape etc., they did not seem to work that well for one reason or another.
I had read/heard about using the carpet protector somewhere, and gave it a try and it worked good.
The thing is to make sure that you press it down to the wood well to give support during the cut.

-- Do or do not, there is no try!

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2593 days


#6 posted 08-07-2010 07:28 PM

Not cheap, but this is what I use on my home built panel saw with a 7-1/4” Dewalt. 60T
http://www.forrestblades.com/hiat.htm

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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