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Miter Fence for Miter Saw

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Forum topic by ChemicalMan posted 08-02-2010 03:28 PM 1239 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChemicalMan

2 posts in 2322 days


08-02-2010 03:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: miter saw question

I am new to woodworking a recently purchased a Craftsman 15 amp 10’’ Sliding Miter Saw. I realized that the left fence was not completely flush with the right fence. I looked at other saws and realized that all of them do this to some degree, but I feel that it was severe on this model.

I can square it up to cut either an inch off the board (board only flush with the left fence) or a foot off the board (flush with both fences), but not for both. Does anyone have any suggestions for modifying the fence OR am I missing something in squaring up the saw? Is there a better model for about the same price ($199).

Thanks.


6 replies so far

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#1 posted 08-02-2010 06:41 PM

IMO – those fences have to be properly aligned. You should not have to cope with them being out of alignment.

Complain and/or get a different saw.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3116 days


#2 posted 08-02-2010 06:48 PM

sounds like a defective item – I’d swap it for another if you are planning to keep this model. or look at craigslist for a used higher end model in the same price range.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#3 posted 08-02-2010 09:12 PM

If, for some reason, you cannot have the saw fixed and you cannot return it, I offer this suggestion.

I like to attach 3/8” wooden boards to my miter saw fences. I do this primarily to get taller fences. Of course, I have to countersink the screw heads so they don’t interfere.

If the fences were not lined up I would shave just the right amount off of one of the boards so that, after mounting the boards the fence surfaces are perfectly lined up. A drum sander may be the best way to alter the thickness of one board. I think you could also do it with a thickness planer.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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ChemicalMan

2 posts in 2322 days


#4 posted 08-02-2010 09:49 PM

Thanks for your suggestions. I was able to return the saw and may am now looking to purchase a different one.

But I noticed that all the saws at the store did this to some extent. I would line up my square on the left fence and then push it to the right fence, where it would “catch” ever so slightly on more expensive models and a little more on the cheaper models. I don’t know if someone could repeat this on their saw and let me know if I am making a mountain out of a mole hill.

Thanks.

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#5 posted 08-02-2010 11:51 PM

I get an almost negligible catch on my Makita CSMS. I would say they are out of alignment by less than 1/1000 of an inch.

I have a wood board attached to each fence like I mentioned before and I can’t tell if this is a problem with the tool’s fence or the boards I attached.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Chriskmb5150's profile

Chriskmb5150

253 posts in 2543 days


#6 posted 08-03-2010 12:51 AM

I have the same saw. what i did was clamp the fence in a sheetmetal brake and heat up the aluminum a bit then let it cool while still clamped. it cooled true.

-- Woodworkers theory of relativity - the quality of your scrap is relative to your skill level

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