LumberJocks

Problem with arbor nut and shaft on older Craftsman table saw. Need help!

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by SweetTea posted 12-02-2016 12:31 PM 1987 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


12-02-2016 12:31 PM

I have an older Craftsman 113.241691 table saw that I keep a dado blade on at all times so that I can keep from constantly having to go back and forth with the blades on my cabinet saw. I am trying to change the dado blade because the old one is worn out and needs to be sent off for sharpening.

Anyway, the problem that I am having is that when I go to turn the arbor nut with my wrench, the entire shaft turns with it. I have never had this happen on this saw. I have a piece of wood holding the blade, and it isn’t spinning, it’s the arbor nut and shaft that spin, with no apparent way of locking the shaft down, and no flat area on the opposite side of the shaft to secure a second wrench like you have to do on most other saws.

Do you guys have any advice on what might be causing this and what a good solution might be? I seriously don’t want to have to replace the saw. Thanks in advance for the advice.


16 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1624 posts in 2647 days


#1 posted 12-02-2016 12:52 PM

If you shaft has no provision for a spanner backup wrench , you can raise the blade high and place wrench on arbor nut in a vertical position then strike swiftly with a dead blow or similar. should work fine,

Your experience is commensurate with leaving blades of that type on a shaft for long periods and or over tightening.

BTW…make sure you strike in the proper direction

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#2 posted 12-02-2016 12:58 PM



If you shaft has no provision for a spanner backup wrench , you can raise the blade high and place wrench on arbor nut in a vertical position then strike swiftly with a dead blow or similar. should work fine,

Your experience is commensurate with leaving blades of that type on a shaft for long periods and or over tightening.

BTW…make sure you strike in the proper direction

- cabmaker

The nut spins with the shaft. It’s not on there very tight at all. I just changed the dado blade 30 minutes ago. Went to take a shim out immediently after making a test cut, and then this happens. It was only on there finger tight.

Is there anyway of replacing the shaft? Would that be possible or even advisable? I wonder if the shaft is still available, and more so, how hard it would be to change out the shaft?

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1624 posts in 2647 days


#3 posted 12-02-2016 01:17 PM

I can’t answer that specifically but can only say that it should be replaceable for sure.
I f you can manage again to remove the nut and expose the shaft e enough, you may be able to file on it.
Probably your shaft has developed a sweet spot for the nut.

I understand your frustration and hope i am understanding your problem, but don’t give up on it 1

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#4 posted 12-03-2016 10:28 AM

What would cause the shaft to spin like that? I don’t think simply replacing the shaft/arbor is going to fix this issue. There must be some reason or some part that broke loose. If I could figure that out then I would have a much better chance of fixing it. I need to get this done fast as possible. Otherwise I will have to buy a new saw, which I don’t want!

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1624 posts in 2647 days


#5 posted 12-03-2016 01:56 PM

Sweet tea, your arbor shaft may have a keyway that has been corrupted

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#6 posted 12-03-2016 04:35 PM



Sweet tea, your arbor shaft may have a keyway that has been corrupted

- cabmaker

Do you have any advice on how to tell? If it does, what would be the best way to fix it? I have never disassembled a complete blade assembly like this, but I figure that is the only way to get it fixed.

View wichman3's profile

wichman3

49 posts in 459 days


#7 posted 12-03-2016 05:39 PM

Direct drive or pulley?
one way to get the nut off is to use a drill, a flex shaft adapter, a 3/8 socket drives and a socket that fits the nut. The the drill torsion to back the nut off the shaft. Then, clean up the threads on the shaft.

If you can remove the motor, carefully drill a hole in the end of the shaft (either end), tap the hole and install a bolt (head diameter less than the shaft diameter, a jam nut at the end of the bolt may be required to give enough surface so you’re not just rounding off a small bolt head) epoxy in place. Use the head of the nut to brace the shaft to remove/replace the arbor nut.

View Dan Hux's profile

Dan Hux

577 posts in 3212 days


#8 posted 12-03-2016 06:53 PM

Clamp down on the drive belt up close to the arbor, then try to take the nut off. I have a old craftsman like yours, I’ve never had this happen. Sounds like it went on cross-threaded, but i’m sure you would have felt that happening when putting it on.

-- Dan Hux,,,,Raleigh, NC http://whitdaniel.com

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6006 posts in 2037 days


#9 posted 12-03-2016 06:54 PM

That is one of those flex-drive things… so no pulley/belt to hold onto unfortunately. I’d be very, very cautious about drilling/tapping the shaft for a bolt… it will most likely throw things out of balance and properly drilling the hardened shaft would be a difficult task by itself.

The manual states that you use the block of wood method for removal/insertion… so you are doing it right. Make sure you are pulling the wrench towards you. The arbor nut is probably frozen on the spindle from being in place for so long. I’d try giving it a good squirt of penetrating fluid first and letting it sit for a while. Then try tapping the wrench as mentioned above… which will in effect be acting like an impact wrench. A little heat would probably free things up as well. If that doesn’t work, you might be able to take the flex shaft off the motor or figure out a way to keep it from spinning there, and then doing the impact thing.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 407 days


#10 posted 12-03-2016 06:58 PM

Pulling it towards you IF the nut is on the left side of the blade AND if you are working from the front of the saw.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

867 posts in 1790 days


#11 posted 12-03-2016 07:04 PM

mrbob: I think you would pull the wrench towards you (if you are in front of the saw) no matter which side of the blade the nut is on. The nut threads on opposite to the direction of the blade rotation so that it stays tight, if I understand correctly.

Brad: In his first response the OP indicated that the nut had only been on for one test cut and was just finger tight. He was adjusting shims on his dado stack.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6006 posts in 2037 days


#12 posted 12-03-2016 07:15 PM

Pulling it towards you IF the nut is on the left side of the blade AND if you are working from the front of the saw.
- mrbob

Doesn’t matter what side the nut is on… and it would be a right tilt machine if the nut was on the left… which it isn’t.
From the manual :

Brad: In his first response the OP indicated that the nut had only been on for one test cut and was just finger tight. He was adjusting shims on his dado stack.
- Kazooman

Yeah, I missed the followup response. The nut will tighten in use, even if you just put it on finger tight… an impact method should break it free in that case, as it certainly isn’t frozen in place from sitting so long :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#13 posted 12-04-2016 10:32 AM

Ok so to update everyone, I was able to get the nut off and pulled the brand new dado blade off as well. I will just have to use my cabinet saw to do dado’s until I am about to either get this unit repaired or get a new saw (dedicated dado saw).

This saw is what I believe to be called a flex drive saw. It has the motor handing out the back like most of these saws but instead of a belt, it uses a flex drive (thick) cable that goes from the motor to the blade.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

246 posts in 498 days


#14 posted 12-04-2016 10:39 AM

Just to clarify the problem, I can’t install a new dado blade (again, this is a dedicated dado saw) because even with the blade held in place with a scrap block of wood, when you go to tighten the arbor nut, the shaft spins with the nut, instead of being locked in place.

Someone earlier in this thread mentioned that perhaps the arbor shaft has a key type mechanism that holds the shaft in place, and perhaps this key mechanism has malfunctioned.

I think that my only hope is to pull the motor and blade assembly!and go through it piece by piece until I find the culprit. Anyone have any advice before I get started? Can the blade assembly be removed without removing the gears for raising, lowering and tilting the blade?

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2611 posts in 2135 days


#15 posted 12-04-2016 02:01 PM

How does the flexible shaft attach to the arbor shaft? If it’s inserted and has a square or multi-sided tip (for lack of a better word) it may be rounded over or stripped and you need a new shaft. Or maybe it has a set screw that is simply loose. Considering the price of a new shaft you may want to look for a belt drive saw.

http://www.searspartsdirect.com/part-number/62884/0009/113.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cse&utm_term=62884&sid=SPDxGPROD&gclid=CMSojrTZ2tACFRBWDQodlXwCeQ

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com