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Forum topic by WhiskeyCreek posted 12-01-2016 07:11 PM 2015 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WhiskeyCreek

17 posts in 992 days


12-01-2016 07:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: festool mortiser powermatic powertools mortis and tenon question tip

I am setting up to buy one or the other. I really like the versatility and speed of the Domino, but I really enjoy the tradition and skill of making mortis and tenon joints. Not to mention the extra strength a beefy mortise and tenon will provide you. Anybody have an opinion of which road to go down? I already have a biscuit jointer, but that can only be used for smaller work and not provide the structural support I desire. I am willing to spend the extra cash on the domino if it is the best road to go down. Any info would be great!
Ethan

-- Whiskey Creek Woodmill & Co.


16 replies so far

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2906 days


#1 posted 12-01-2016 09:02 PM

OK I can speak to this as I’ve owned both. I had the domino when it first came out, and now own the Floor standing 714T from powermatic.

They both have pro’s and con’s.

The domino is basically a floating tenon and I had been using that prior to purchasing. It’s nice but with fixed width slots and domino’s if you have wide pieces you have to cut more than one slot to maintain that 1/3,1/3,1/3 rule for tenon’s to mortice ratio That I like.

With it I’d cut one side snug and the mating side one notch wide so you had allignment room. IT cuts like a biscuit jointer (had and sold one of those too).

Only complalint i had was some times those domino’s were too snug and i’d have to shape em down with a pocket knife some times not a big deal but someting that takes time.

penclil marks with rough pieces together and go to town. On the down side that preclamping and aligning was a PIA at times. Also when gluing up, I had to remember not to overdo it on clamping pressure or I would introduce a bow in the frame.

Don’t get me wrong, used it for a long time and its strong and is a great tool.

Now for the mortice machine. I sold my domino almost for what I paid and used that pplus another couple hundred bought the full size machine.

I do like that machine and while I’ve not had to do use the angled mortice much it’s nice. I like it for through tenons as well, and I also use it for other purposes as well.

There are day’s every now and then I would like to have that domino again, but don’t regret the change. The domino is nice but to me in my uses, the 714T is better and I don’t regret the change. Especially cutting those mortices in small pieces clamping them down to do with the domino and then moving the clamps to cut again was a PIA.

Good luck either will get the job done.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

341 posts in 2300 days


#2 posted 12-01-2016 10:45 PM

I guess the work you do will drive the need in a way. What projects do you do most? Multiple dominoes with epoxy at some point probably equal a integral M&T, unless we’re talking a wedged M&T. Are you worried about speed of work, or more geared toward traditional methods?

I don’t have a domino but have used one a few times… i like it a lot. I have benchtop mostiser that is very will tuned and the chisels are spot on razor sharp and honed, it really nice to use. I like the integral tenon, but there is no denying that planing around dominos is so fast and efficinent.

that probably didn’t help, my decider would be you will only love that mortiser with the chisels well tuned.

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3160 days


#3 posted 12-02-2016 01:20 AM

I own a Domino 500 and 700 along with a General 220 mortiser (a foot actuated beast). For years now the mortiser tends to sit unused for long periods of time because the Domino is just too fast, easy and accurate not to use. For the rare times I want to use traditional mortise and tenons I tend to do it the traditional way and hand cut them. If I am using traditional joinery for the sake of using traditional joinery I will produce them in a traditional way. I would bet of all the people who have owned both a mortiser and Domino at the same time and decided to divest themselves of one 80+ percent will have sold the mortiser.

View Hawkeye1434's profile

Hawkeye1434

14 posts in 1287 days


#4 posted 12-02-2016 03:02 AM

Hey it’s completely up to you but from someone who owns the festool Domino for over three years now I have to say even if you like the idea of doing the mortise and tenon, after the joints put together your customer doesn’t know any different the festool Domino is so much faster so much more accurate and convenient and the joint is super superstrong I will never go back.

Recknerhomeinspections.com

-- Do it Right the First Time recknerhomeinspections.com

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2652 days


#5 posted 12-02-2016 04:14 AM

I have the Jet JFM-5 floor mortiser. Basically the same tool as the non-tilting Powermatic. It is quite an upgrade from my old bench top mortiser. I do a lot of through mortises, so a floor mortiser was just the ticket. You can make any size mortise you need, so it’s very flexible that way.

A mortiser can’t compete with a domino for speed, but a domino can’t cut square through tenons either. Then do you get the standard domino or the XL?

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Marcial's profile

Marcial

135 posts in 384 days


#6 posted 12-02-2016 04:22 AM

I’ve had a benchtop mortise for 20 yrs and a Domino for 3. My experience is pretty much that of the majority view thus far. The Domino is a better choice for 80% of what I do, but the mortiser still sees use. Look at it more in the “horses for courses” rather than “either/or”.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

637 posts in 740 days


#7 posted 12-02-2016 05:00 AM

I’m still holding out for the harbor freight version.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3160 days


#8 posted 12-02-2016 07:12 AM



I m still holding out for the harbor freight version.

- DirtyMike

They will be in stores… in about a decade.

View CB_Cohick's profile

CB_Cohick

483 posts in 1090 days


#9 posted 12-02-2016 03:19 PM

If I had a commercial operation, I’d get a Domino. My old Delta mortiser works fine for the furniture I make for myself and my family. I got it for about $150 on Craig’s List, and I am not buying expensive domino floating tenons. If you can afford the Domino, you can probably afford both, lol.

-- Chris - Would work, but I'm too busy reading about woodwork.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3160 days


#10 posted 12-02-2016 10:34 PM



If I had a commercial operation, I d get a Domino. My old Delta mortiser works fine for the furniture I make for myself and my family. I got it for about $150 on Craig s List, and I am not buying expensive domino floating tenons. If you can afford the Domino, you can probably afford both, lol.

- CB_Cohick

I often see the cost of Dominos mentioned as a deterrent to use of a Domino, I usually find this is a result of not doing the math.

Let’s consider a single case scenario with a 6” wide board 3/4” thick attached to another board. On the traditional M&T side lets say you are ONLY going to use a 1” deep tenon. If you started with 4/4” rough lumber you are using 1/24th of a board foot to make that tenon, since the rest will be wasted. Let’s say the wood you are using is a moderate $6 a board foot that means the tenon will cost you 25 cents. Two 6mm Dominos will cost you $16 cents. You basically break even if the lumber is $4 a board foot in this hypothetical.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 1949 days


#11 posted 12-03-2016 12:20 AM

We just hashed this out a week or so ago… ;^)

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/189258

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1276 posts in 1949 days


#12 posted 12-03-2016 12:24 AM

It’s nice but with fixed width slots and domino’s if you have wide pieces you have to cut more than one slot to maintain that 1/3,1/3,1/3 rule for tenon’s to mortice ratio That I lik

BTW… That “rule” is actually based on hand tools. The thirds were mainly to prevent a mortise chisel from blowing out a side. It’s right up there with leaving “horns” on the stiles.

With machines, including HCM’s, routers, Dominos… blowing out the mortise is pretty unlikely and thinner sides are fine.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

331 posts in 798 days


#13 posted 12-04-2016 01:45 AM



If I had a commercial operation, I d get a Domino. My old Delta mortiser works fine for the furniture I make for myself and my family. I got it for about $150 on Craig s List, and I am not buying expensive domino floating tenons. If you can afford the Domino, you can probably afford both, lol.

- CB_Cohick

Agree….If it isn’t making money it must be costing money…..

View kroginold's profile

kroginold

23 posts in 887 days


#14 posted 12-08-2016 08:42 AM

There is one other option if you are doing smaller projects that don’t need the strength of dominoes or mortise and tendons: dowel joints. You can use a traditional jig and drill, beadlock system which is closer to a domino, or a duo doweling machine. The top of line is a Mafell Dual doweller, but that is more expensive than a Domino. The alternative is the Triton dual doweller from Roclker; only about $200 and has most of functions of the Mafell. Both can drill for several dowel sizes, have indexing for multiple dowels and are about as fast as the Domino. I have a Domino 500 and the Triton dual doweller. Both work well, and dowels are cheaper when you don’t need the strength of tenons

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

3660 posts in 2148 days


#15 posted 07-20-2017 12:29 AM



We just hashed this out a week or so ago… ;^)

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/189258

- OggieOglethorpe

I missed that one, glad it came up again.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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