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Forum topic by Devok posted 12-01-2016 02:36 AM 1010 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Devok

5 posts in 380 days


12-01-2016 02:36 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe craftsman question rebuild

Hello out there in internet land!

This is my first post on Lumberjocks but I’ve been enjoying reading what others have had to offer for a while. I am the proud new owner of this beautiful old lathe. I’m starting to disassemble with a rebuild in mind and thought I would post some photos in an effort to glean any info I can on this lathe.

What I know…

The lathe appears to be a 9” x 30” and, judging by the old catalogues I’ve been searching through, it may have been sold under the Craftsman name in 1935.

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=2768

This would give it a model number of 99PM454. If that is true, there sure doesn’t seem to be much info out there. Unfortunately, there don’t appear to be any markings, emblems, or stamps on the lathe that might give a clue to the maker, let alone the model.

Certain things that may distinguish this lathe from other newer lathes are:
-headstock is open, belt and pulleys visible
-headstock has one bearing and 2 Oilite bushings
-bushings each served by a covered oil cup
-bed ways are flat on far side, not flat (beveled?) on the closer side. The not-flat way is angled upward and a groove in the tailstock rides on this angled lip.

So, can anyone out there give me any info on this? The tool rest appears to be from a later Craftsman lathe and some items like the stopper for the tailstock quill were improvised, so it doesn’t look exactly like the old drawings in the Craftsman catalog.

My goal is not to do an original vintage restoration, but rather turn this into a usable and working tool for my workshop. And hopefully for as little money as possible. I’ve got the tailstock in good working order now and just pulled the bushings from headstock. They look hammered, as does the spindle. It looks like bushings should be easy to find. Not so sure about finding a replacement spindle though.


10 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

6000 posts in 2036 days


#1 posted 12-01-2016 04:12 AM

There was a thread not too long ago about a 1935 craftsman 9×30 here: New Guy With Old Lathe

Headstock looks different as do a couple other things – like the bed ways. I’d try to find one that is similar by browsing through the photo index over at the Vintagemachinery site..

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You might also want to ask over at OWWM... someone will probably recognize it.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Rick_M

10623 posts in 2217 days


#2 posted 12-01-2016 08:28 AM

I don’t know what you have but I don’t think it’s a Craftsman. To me the design looks old, 1910ish, but ball bearings didn’t become semi-common until the early 30’s (Power King and Delta, Craftsman didn’t use bearings until the 40’s AFAIK). There were a lot of essentially no name lathes back then and tapers and threads had not become standardized. How is the spur drive attached? Brad is right, OWWM is probably your best shot.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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mike02130

167 posts in 509 days


#3 posted 12-01-2016 02:24 PM

Brad is always right.

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

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Rick_M

10623 posts in 2217 days


#4 posted 12-01-2016 04:20 PM

Where do I sign up for the Brad in FL fanclub and do I get Mickey ears?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Wildwood

2186 posts in 1971 days


#5 posted 12-01-2016 08:23 PM

Don’t think will have any trouble finding the right brass/bronze plain sleeve bearings/bushings if measure carefully. Would try to salvage MT #1 headstock spindle if possible; if measure carefully may find that too!

Good luck with it!

-- Bill

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Devok

5 posts in 380 days


#6 posted 12-03-2016 05:05 PM

Thanks for the replies. I had a computer meltdown so I’ve been trying to salvage that instead of the lathe. Not as fun…

Brad, I do agree it looks different. For one, the belt can drop straight down through the headstock instead of out the side as pictured in the 1935 catalog. Much looks the same but I think you’re right that it is probably something else, maybe another brand’s knock-off.

Rick, I’m not sure I follow your question about spur attachment…it is a tapered spur, though I’m not sure of the taper. It just slides in and hangs on.

Bil, the spindle is pretty beat. It has exterior wear from grinding away in the bushings. The inside of the taper is also haggard. In fact, it would appear that someone put little gobs of brazing on the spur to get it to stay put (not spin) in the spindle. I figured I could probably clean up the inside of the taper with a taper reamer but I’m not sure about getting it to roll smooth again. Perhaps find someone to turn the outside of the spindle down slightly and replace bushings and bearing with slightly smaller inside diameter?

I’ll post on OWWM and see if what I come up with. I feel like I’ve clicked through every lathe photo on VintageMachinery. Thanks again.

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Rick_M

10623 posts in 2217 days


#7 posted 12-03-2016 07:58 PM


Rick, I m not sure I follow your question about spur attachment…it is a tapered spur, though I m not sure of the taper. It just slides in and hangs on.
- Devok

Taper answers my question. I wasn’t assuming there was a taper since the spindle looks so small and tapers weren’t always standard. Spur drives were also attached with set screws or threaded. Are you restoring as a labor of love of old machines or to make an inexpensive daily driver?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Devok

5 posts in 380 days


#8 posted 12-03-2016 08:59 PM

Copy that. For reference, the spindle OD is about 3/4” without using the calipers. Arrow indicated especially nasty spot where its been riding on bearing.

Restoring the lathe to use for occasional pieces on projects (legs, handles, etc.) and perhaps some bowl turning. I’m not particularly concerned with keeping things original/vintage but do appreciate it for being the heavy piece of old iron that it is. The lathe belonged to a late family member which adds to the sentimental value. Plus the fixing and tinkering is appealing. I’ve certainly considered looking for a good used lathe (with a wider swing) and passing this along to someone who might be more interested in doing a vintage restore. I think that might come down to whether I can clean up the spindle or not (or replace).

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MrUnix

6000 posts in 2036 days


#9 posted 12-03-2016 09:21 PM

Check the bronze bushings to see if they have been damaged. The spindle doesn’t look too bad actually (looks pretty good in fact), but does go to show what can happen if you let them things go dry. If left in that condition for much longer, they would get chewed up fairly quickly. Properly oiled, bronze bushings will last significantly longer than ball bearings, and have a significantly lower coefficient of friction.

Many people think that a metal on metal bearing surface would not last as long, but that isn’t what is happening. The oil creates a liquid layer between the shaft and bushing, causing it to effectively ride on the oil, not the metal. As long as that thin oil layer is present, there is basically no wear at all since they never really come into contact except at start-up (where the oil hasn’t had time to spread out yet).

But judging from your photo, you are probably good to go. Clean the spindle and bearings good and keep ‘em oiled. A good 20W non-detergent oil will be fine, or I prefer to use an AW-32 hydraulic oil in both my wood and metal lathes with sleeve bearings. You might also want to take a look at the thrust bearing to see if it needs replacing, or you might be able to clean it out and re-pack with grease if it has a rubber seal or has an open cage.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Check the spindle thread… if your spindle is 3/4”, then you probably have either a 3/4”-10tpi or 3/4”-16tpi spindle nose, which you will need to know if you want to get any thread-on accessories (faceplates, chucks) or want to make your own faceplates out of scrap wood using a thread tap.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Devok

5 posts in 380 days


#10 posted 12-03-2016 09:53 PM

One of the bushings is crumbling on its end so it probably needs to be replaced. So I’ll do both of them. Bearing does have an open cage. I cleaned it and it looks intact. I thought I might replace that while I was at it since there seems to be some play there. Though when the spindle is tightened up, maybe the bearing guts settle out where they need to be.

And thanks for the recommendations on oil.

It would appear to be 3/4”-16tpi. Thanks.

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