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How do I make this wood joint for a butchers block

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Forum topic by Rochesterwood posted 11-27-2016 02:05 PM 1848 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rochesterwood

5 posts in 380 days


11-27-2016 02:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joining butcher block wood

I have recently restored an old butchers block. I want to recreate it myself but I am unsure how to make the joints that are connecting the wood. How do you make these is there a tool or a machine I need to make them?


17 replies so far

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johnstoneb

2631 posts in 2006 days


#1 posted 11-27-2016 02:25 PM

Those are sliding dovetails. Router, dovetail bit and straight edge and lots of practice. There are also dovetail jigs available that will make short sliding dovetails and there are hand planes available to make dovetails also. Dovetails require a lot of practice to get right.

That is a beautiful old butcher block. It has definitely seen a lot of use. Those dovetails are probably one reason it has lasted as long as it has. Most butcher blocks I have seen just face glue the wood with no joints They will last a long time but not like the one you have.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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a1Jim

116554 posts in 3410 days


#2 posted 11-27-2016 05:05 PM

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Rochesterwood

5 posts in 380 days


#3 posted 11-28-2016 01:23 AM

Thank you a1jim and Bruce I really appreciate the input. I have been looking if there was a specific way to do it on the edge of boards but maybe I just have to experiment.

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a1Jim

116554 posts in 3410 days


#4 posted 11-28-2016 01:48 AM

BTW Welcome to Ljs Rochester

I would guess that there is more than just the ends that are dovetailed,It looks like the dovetails go all the way from top to bottom. Take a look at the bottom and if there are dovetails on the bottom too then they go all the way through.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Rochesterwood

5 posts in 380 days


#5 posted 11-28-2016 01:53 AM

Thank you I am new to the forum scene so this is all new.

And yes you are correct it does go all the way from top to bottom on each board.

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 735 days


#6 posted 11-28-2016 01:55 AM

I am curious, was a shaper was used to cut those dovetails?

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a1Jim

116554 posts in 3410 days


#7 posted 11-28-2016 02:01 AM

I would guess if these were factory made a shaper with a power feeder would be a good choice to make that much sliding dovetail area,but it could be done on a router table and even a table saw with the right set up.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Rochesterwood

5 posts in 380 days


#8 posted 11-28-2016 02:07 AM

Thank you I am in the middle of restoring an old craftsman table saw once that’s finished maybe I’ll play around with it! Thank you!

View IowaBeauty's profile

IowaBeauty

11 posts in 378 days


#9 posted 11-28-2016 02:11 AM



I would guess that there is more than just the ends that are dovetailed,It looks like the dovetails go all the way from top to bottom. Take a look at the bottom and if there are dovetails on the bottom too then they go all the way through

How could they not go all the way through?

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a1Jim

116554 posts in 3410 days


#10 posted 11-28-2016 02:17 AM

Here’s some information on using a table saw to make sliding dovetails.

https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/tipstechniques/sliding-dovetails

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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a1Jim

116554 posts in 3410 days


#11 posted 11-28-2016 02:43 AM

Welcome to Ljs Iowabeauty
I can think of some ways but why wouldn’t you have them go through all the other ways would be a big hassle to make.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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jbay

1851 posts in 732 days


#12 posted 11-28-2016 03:03 AM


I would guess if these were factory made a shaper with a power feeder would be a good choice to make that much sliding dovetail area,but it could be done on a router table and even a table saw with the right set up.

- a1Jim

My brain must not be working properly, I’m having trouble picturing how a shaper could cut a dovetail. Is that possible?
I could picture doing the tenon, 1 side at a time.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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a1Jim

116554 posts in 3410 days


#13 posted 11-28-2016 03:33 AM

Hi J
My father inlaw use to make them on his tilting head shaper with cutters he ground himself.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View JDCDDesign's profile

JDCDDesign

8 posts in 378 days


#14 posted 11-28-2016 06:12 AM

Alot of great information here! Iv also been wondering how to make these sliding dovetail joins.

-- James, Victoria, BC https://www.youtube.com/user/JamesDCD92

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jbay

1851 posts in 732 days


#15 posted 11-28-2016 05:07 PM


Hi J
My father inlaw use to make them on his tilting head shaper with cutters he ground himself.

- a1Jim

I still can’t picture it, but if you say so.
We are talking about the mortise, right?

May be possible to make one half of the mortise cut at a time, but the throat would end up being pretty wide.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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