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Standard House Wiring To 240?

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Forum topic by jonnybrophy posted 11-27-2016 01:06 AM 650 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jonnybrophy

160 posts in 445 days


11-27-2016 01:06 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tools noob 110 volts wiring

Hey guys, im just browsing craigslist and I found a decently good find
https://orlando.craigslist.org/for/5824982583.html
I really want it. Its a HUGE upgrade for me, but my question is
What do i have to do power wise? I am not much of an electrician, and I dont own my house(Im 18), so i dont think ill be able to do anything drastic.
Is 110 to 240 to much? or is it exspensive?
All help is appreciated

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"


15 replies so far

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BorkBob

127 posts in 2526 days


#1 posted 11-27-2016 01:27 AM

Hi Jonny,

Standard residential electrical service is two “legs” each providing 120 volts. In order for 120 to work, it needs a second wire (neutral). Usually the service comes to the house via 3 cables. Two 120 volt “hots” and one neutral.

If you want 240 volts, you use the two 120 volt lines, no neutral needed. A third wire in 240 volt circuits is called an equipment ground and the only time it carries current is if something is wrong. It carries the “wrong” current to the ground (earth) instead of thru your heart and brain.

There are now 4-wire 240 volt circuits. A neutral wire is added to accommodate 120 volt devices, such as a light inside the dryer.

Talk to the home’s owner about your house’s electric service. You may be able to work out a deal.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

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jonnybrophy

160 posts in 445 days


#2 posted 11-27-2016 01:41 AM

Thanks Borkbob!
Would you say this is a simple process?
im still a little lost, but i get the idea.

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"

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MrUnix

5979 posts in 2033 days


#3 posted 11-27-2016 01:48 AM

Your house is already wired for 240v, at the breaker box at least. And you should have at least a few 240V circuits, such as for the A/C, heater, range and other large electric loads. Got a clothes dryer outlet anywhere near where you would want to have the saw?

Cheers,
Brad

PS: That saw is way over priced IMO.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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HokieKen

4505 posts in 972 days


#4 posted 11-27-2016 02:23 AM

I agree with Brad. $850 is pretty steep for that saw.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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sawdustdad

334 posts in 719 days


#5 posted 11-27-2016 02:31 AM

Best to get a qualified electrician to help you with this.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Half of all boards cut to a specific length will be too short.

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BorkBob

127 posts in 2526 days


#6 posted 11-27-2016 09:12 PM

If you work with plumbing, you can get wet and/or stinky. If you work with electricity, you can get dead.

I admire your “can do” attitude, but you really do need professional guidance.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

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jonnybrophy

160 posts in 445 days


#7 posted 11-27-2016 09:15 PM

Thanks guys! just so happens, i work in my garage, a mere 10 or so feet from my washer and dryer. Is it as simple as just plugging into that oulet?

Thanks borkbob, but its all a beginner can do, am i right:)
P.S. I may not know what i am doing, but i know not to get myself killed:P dont worry, I wont touch anything until i have consulted a proffessional.

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"

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jonnybrophy

160 posts in 445 days


#8 posted 11-27-2016 09:16 PM

Also, what do you think i could get that saw for? 500 maybe? or should i just keep waiting for a better one to come along?

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3155 days


#9 posted 11-27-2016 09:48 PM

Ad as deleted.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#10 posted 11-27-2016 10:22 PM

If you are renting don’t touch the electric in the house without checking with the landlord. It may need a permit in your locality and if you do it illegally you may find yourself looking for another rental.

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jonnybrophy

160 posts in 445 days


#11 posted 11-27-2016 10:24 PM

Guys, i live with my parents, we own the house.
And unfortunatley i see that the ad is deleted.
Hopefully it will be reposted

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2557 posts in 1859 days


#12 posted 11-28-2016 01:03 AM

Keep your eye out. More saws will come along, and at least one (all you need) will be at a better price.

Yes, by all means use your dryer outlet for 240v. All you need is a matching plug on the saw’s cord. Of course, if you end up with something less than a cabinet saw, you will probably only need 120 volts. But the cabinet saw is really nice if you can get there. Second best would be a hybrid. Third would be a contractor’s saw (with motor hanging out the back). Last would be a jobsite saw, with its little screaming universal motor.

But here’s a question for those more knowledgeable than I am about electricity: can the neutral wire from a dryer be used for the ground? I know that Square D panels combine ground and neutral on the same bus, but I don’t know about others.

Do check out KnottScott’s blog about table saws.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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jonnybrophy

160 posts in 445 days


#13 posted 11-28-2016 02:31 AM

Thanks guys, I really appreciate the help. You really cleared some things up for me.

-- "If she dont find ya handsome, she better find ya handy"

View BorkBob's profile

BorkBob

127 posts in 2526 days


#14 posted 11-28-2016 02:40 AM

When I was a kid (and slave labor to my electrician step dad) most house wiring was two or three conductors. The 110 v circuits were a hot and a neutral and had no grounding conductor. The 220 v circuits were three conductors, two hots and a grounding wire. The neutral and grounding wires shared a buss in the panel.

Grounded 110 (later 120) v circuits came along in the early 60’s. 220 (later 240) remained 3 wire for a little longer. Because the neutral wire in 110 v circuits is current carrying when the circuit is in use, this meant the grounding wires sharing the same buss could be carrying current too. So, separate neutral busses and grounding busses were born and never the twain shall meet.

The third wire in the 220 v circuits used to be both a grounding conductor and a neutral for any 110 volt uses. Now it requires 4 wires.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross / www.theborkstore.com

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dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#15 posted 11-28-2016 02:58 PM

Not an electrical-related answer but – I’ll go against trend here. If I were 18 again (sigh) and had $850 to spend I would upgrade the fence system on the saw I already had, then buy a nice router. And a nice sander. And a nice…..etc. You get the point.

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