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need advice on hand sharpened Disston saw on ebay

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Forum topic by tonyfranciozi posted 07-27-2010 10:51 PM 1885 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tonyfranciozi

4 posts in 2322 days


07-27-2010 10:51 PM

I’m thinking about bidding on this saw:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=250670448957&ssPag...

Any idea what it’s worth or how much time goes into sharpening a saw
like this one?

Just how difficult is it to do a decent sharpening job?

Thanks in advance


16 replies so far

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spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2357 days


#1 posted 07-27-2010 11:29 PM

Sharpening is easy, jsut file the teeth so they all have a uniform flat spot on top, this makes sure they are the same size, then use a triangle file to file the tooth until the flat spot dissapears. The tricky part is setting the teeth you need a special saw set tool to do that, if you have that tool, and you know the pattern to set the teeth at and by how much, you can resharpen it forever, and looks like he gives that information. I think you can get a setting tool from Lee Vally or Lie Neilson.

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spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2357 days


#2 posted 07-27-2010 11:30 PM

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tonyfranciozi

4 posts in 2322 days


#3 posted 07-28-2010 12:17 AM

Ok but how do you file them all to precise, consistent angles?

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tonyfranciozi

4 posts in 2322 days


#4 posted 07-28-2010 12:32 AM

I mean, look at the closeup photo of the individual teeth, how could anyone file them with such uniformity?

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Daren Nelson

767 posts in 3368 days


#5 posted 07-28-2010 12:43 AM

The listing (your listing ?) gives one source for reading on the subject “The Art of Saw Filing”...it may be an art…but it ain’t rocket science…

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3023 days


#6 posted 07-28-2010 02:00 AM

Take it to a pro and have them do it. Cost probably around $12.00 if my memory is correct.

-- Joe

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tonyfranciozi

4 posts in 2322 days


#7 posted 07-28-2010 03:42 AM

Will a pro hand sharpen it for $12 or is it done on a machine? Is there a difference?

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3023 days


#8 posted 07-28-2010 03:51 AM

My “pro” uses a machine. I’d say finding someone who can beat the consistency and accuracy of a machine would be very difficult in this day and age. If you want to learn the art yourself, don’t plan on using the saw for a long time and run the risk of screwing it up so bad it may never cut again, I’m just sayin.

(He does mail order stuff from all over the country. If you are intereste I’ll send you his contact info. He sharpens everything from lawn mower blades to carbide saw blades. Most of his tools are automatic, but I think his hand saw machine is manual, because only 2 of his people can use it.

-- Joe

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TopamaxSurvivor

17664 posts in 3138 days


#9 posted 07-28-2010 05:23 AM

Those hand saws were bringing a pretty penny a couple years ago. Interesting to see what it brings now??

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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swirt

2117 posts in 2434 days


#10 posted 07-28-2010 05:47 AM

This is a great tutorial on hand sharpening done by Bob Smalser
http://www.cianperez.com/Wood/WoodDocs/Wood_How_To/INDEX_How_To_pages/Smalser_on_SharpeningHandsaws.htm

It is an interesting read, then you can decide whether it is something you want to do.

The question of worth always comes down to What’s it worth to you? How bad do you want this saw. It looks like it is in good shape.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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TopamaxSurvivor

17664 posts in 3138 days


#11 posted 07-28-2010 05:54 AM

Wow!! What a link swirt!! I could spend the rest of the year on there ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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swirt

2117 posts in 2434 days


#12 posted 07-28-2010 04:43 PM

I refer back to it every so often.

I just converted an old backsaw from crosscut to rip and it took me a few times to get it right. It now works quite well for dovetails. The reason it took a few tries was I had missed a crucial detail in Bob Smalser’s article … once I had all the steps right, it wasn’t so bad.

I’m glad I took the time to learn to do it. But I am not sure if I will continue to do it. This little backsaw took an hour and a half …. it would only take me 20 minutes now that I know the routine and can do it without making mistakes. However, the thought of doing a longer saw, makes me think I might just take it to somebody that does it professionally. The movements aren’t so bad, but it is tough on the eyes and the noise is annoying. You’ve got to pick your battles ;)

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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JimF

143 posts in 2755 days


#13 posted 07-28-2010 06:21 PM

Ther’s another saw sharpener on ebay who sharpens old Disstons and other good quality old saws by hand. He typically gets $75-$150 (depending on the specific saw). I wanted to get one, but felt the price always ended up too high. There is a hand sharpener referenced in a Christopher Schwarz blog that I looked up. His services run from $85-$145 depending on how much work the saw needs. You supply your own saw.

I wouldn’t do this to a fellow LJ, but if I had found it on my own, I’d bid on this saw and try to get it for a low price.

-- Insert clever tag line here

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Sawkerf

1730 posts in 2531 days


#14 posted 07-28-2010 07:09 PM

Hand sharpening is a skill that takes time and effort to really master. Done correctly, it’s great, but can really wreck a saw if it’s done badly. It’s pretty much a lost art these days since machine sharpening is faster and probably better – or at least as good.

My grandfather was a carpenter in the 40’s and 50’s and kept his saws sharpened and set to near perfection. I remember watching him work on them and telling me that they weren’t toys to be played with by a kid. – lol I also remember watching him saw thru lumber like it was soft butter.

The saw on eBay doesn’t look like anything really special and I doubt if it’s a “collectable”. It’s probably worth the few dollars being bid, but I wouldn’t spend any money on it just because it’s been “hand sharpened”.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

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swirt

2117 posts in 2434 days


#15 posted 07-28-2010 08:17 PM

Forgot to include this above. Here is info on the D-23
http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/d23page.html

Judging by the handle, this was a later model. Not a cherished saw, but probably still better than you could by for under $30 today.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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