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Forum topic by tnfishdaddy posted 11-25-2016 05:07 PM 771 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 400 days


11-25-2016 05:07 PM

Can anybody tell me what I have and if it is all there? I am wanting to learn to to turn and recently picked this up from my dad. I don’t remember ever seeing him use it. He couldn’t remember much about it either. Is it all there? Can anybody tell me what the loose parts are? Can this be used for pen turning?

https://m.imgur.com/a/fVR4c


20 replies so far

View moke's profile

moke

1036 posts in 2616 days


#1 posted 11-25-2016 06:20 PM

It certainly could, but you will need to figure out what the head and tailstock input size is…..MT2 or MT1 or maybe even the Shopsmith (whatever that is) then order the appropriate mandrel and get to it!!!!
Pray that it is MT2 but I bet it is MT1.

If it is something wierd you could get an adaptor to go on the threads around the outside of the headstock output. Lets hope that is 8 tpi x 1”. You can get an adapter to go on there and screw a mandrel into it. As for what the other parts are, you need to hit youtube. Three are tool rests…they fit into the “banjo” that is the thing inbetween the head stock and tailstock…..the round things are face plates…they screw on the headstock where I was hoping it was 8×1”....there appears to be some turning chisels without handles by the tool rests and the thing that looks like a castiing with a slot appears to be a spare banjo casting.

You need to spend time cleaning this thing…like a lot…then attach it to a table and rig the motor.

Good luck!
Mike

-- Mike

View Don W's profile

Don W

18526 posts in 2408 days


#2 posted 11-25-2016 06:22 PM

there is probably enough there to get you started, but you will need some cutters. And “all there” is a relative term with turning. You can very easily spend more on the cutters, chucks, and other accessories that the original lathe.

I’m sure others can tell you who made the lathe, I can’t help there.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View tnfishdaddy's profile

tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 400 days


#3 posted 11-25-2016 06:28 PM



It certainly could, but you will need to figure out what the head and tailstock input size is…..MT2 or MT1 or maybe even the Shopsmith (whatever that is) then order the appropriate mandrel and get to it!!!!
Pray that it is MT2 but I bet it is MT1.

If it is something wierd you could get an adaptor to go on the threads around the outside of the headstock output. Lets hope that is 8 tpi x 1”. You can get an adapter to go on there and screw a mandrel into it. As for what the other parts are, you need to hit youtube. Three are tool rests…they fit into the “banjo” that is the thing inbetween the head stock and tailstock…..the round things are face plates…they screw on the headstock where I was hoping it was 8×1”....there appears to be some turning chisels without handles by the tool rests and the thing that looks like a castiing with a slot appears to be a spare banjo casting.

You need to spend time cleaning this thing…like a lot…then attach it to a table and rig the motor.

Good luck!
Mike

- moke

How do I tell what size it is (mt1 or 2)?

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4808 posts in 3800 days


#4 posted 11-25-2016 06:29 PM

Throw away that belt. Long gone for use. Lube the spindle well. That’s what those cups are—lube points.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10645 posts in 2220 days


#5 posted 11-25-2016 09:18 PM


How do I tell what size it is (mt1 or 2)?
- tnfishdaddy

It’s actually pretty easy to tell them apart. Almost all old Craftsman lathes are MT1. Looking at yours I’m pretty sure it’s a #1. Spindle is probably 3/4” – 16 tpi.

http://littlemachineshop.com/reference/tapers.php

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View tnfishdaddy's profile

tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 400 days


#6 posted 11-25-2016 11:03 PM

Okay. I brought it up to my shop. I’ve blown the dust off of it. Took a little wd40 to most of it. Everything seems to move and work. My problem is trying to take the head apart to get the belt off. Looking at the head, the only thing that looks like it might unscrew is a silver nut between the head and the pointy part that would attach to the wood. Not sure what to grab so that I can try and unscrew it. What am I doing wrong? Also, the two little cups on top. What kind of oil shod I add?

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tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 400 days


#7 posted 11-25-2016 11:16 PM

Also found these two nuts(?) that screw on to the main shaft. Are they used for anything?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#8 posted 11-25-2016 11:41 PM

Looks like a mid-30’s model… strangely enough, previous years used ball bearings instead of bronze sleeve bearings. Here is the listing from a 1935 catalog:

Try putting a strap wrench on the pulley and using an impact method to remove the nut, either with an impact wrench or banging on a fixed wrench with a soft blow hammer. As for the oil to use, I’d go with a light machine oil or something like 20W non-detergent. For my lathes that use bronze (or cast iron) bearings, I actually prefer AW-32 hydraulic oil, which you can get at the BORG for under $15 a gallon. Those bronze bearings will last forever if kept properly oiled – much longer than ball bearings, but not as easy to replace. Let them go dry, and you will trash them quick.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View tnfishdaddy's profile

tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 400 days


#9 posted 11-25-2016 11:45 PM

By golly, I believe that is it. My dad was born in 33 and he said that he and his dad went in together to buy it used. I will keep working at loosening it up. I would love to get it up and running again. Thank you.

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tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 400 days


#10 posted 11-25-2016 11:48 PM

Would the threads be opposite by any chance? I may be turning the wrong way lol.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2612 posts in 2137 days


#11 posted 11-26-2016 12:39 AM

Go to the publication tab on vintagemachinery.org and look for a manual. It most certainly is there.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10645 posts in 2220 days


#12 posted 11-26-2016 03:42 AM

3N1 is light machine oil.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2612 posts in 2137 days


#13 posted 11-26-2016 01:07 PM

3in1 is too light. But the same company makes an oil for bearings and oil cups in electric motors and I use that on the couple of old tools I have with bushings.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10645 posts in 2220 days


#14 posted 11-26-2016 04:19 PM



3in1 is too light.
- dhazelton

You are wrong. 3n1 is 17W light machine oil. If the manual calls for light machine oil, which most of those old lathes want, then it’s a fine choice.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1509 posts in 1227 days


#15 posted 11-26-2016 07:11 PM

I’d didn’t see a motor in any of the pictures. That will probably be the biggest expense in getting this up and running. If your goal is to enjoy the process of restoring an antique family heirloom to working condition so you can use it, this will be a very gratifying project but if goal is simply to get a lathe you can turn pens on, your money may be better spent buying a more modern new or used mini or midi lathe that is ready to go.

EDIT: I also didn’t see the secondary pulliey set shown the the old catalog entry above. That might make it a little more difficult to set up and use.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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