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General question about securing shaper cutters on spindle

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Forum topic by sh2005 posted 11-23-2016 08:11 PM 802 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sh2005

97 posts in 3073 days


11-23-2016 08:11 PM

I don’t own a shaper and have no hands-on experience using one, so my question may be very trivial. I have been wondering about the mechanics of holding the cutter head secured on the shaper spindle so that it doesn’t spin on the spindle when in contact with wood. From what I have seen in pictures and online videos, cutter heads are held in place on the shaper spindle using a nut – there’s no key, set screws or other means of securing the cutter head. It obviously is, but the nut pressing “down” on the cutter (compression force?) is all it takes to transfer the power from the motor to the cutter head or am I missing something simple? I suppose the same theory applies, although to a lesser extent, to table saw blade mounted on the arbor with a just a nut. When spinning, is there a dynamic force exerted on the cutter head and/or the nut that keeps everything secured? Can’t be the friction, can it be?


6 replies so far

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1262 posts in 1510 days


#1 posted 11-23-2016 11:27 PM

Just the nut. It’s reverse thread to the rotation of the spindle, so self tightening. I learned in the scary old days of lose knives held in slip collars, just by a tightened nut. Tooling has come a long way.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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Andre

1493 posts in 1642 days


#2 posted 11-23-2016 11:35 PM

Same principal as a router on mine, with reverse option you want to make sure she is snugged up tight!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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runswithscissors

2562 posts in 1862 days


#3 posted 11-24-2016 06:08 AM

If you need to run the cutter in reverse (capability of a shaper that a router table doesn’t have), I’d suggest double-nutting on the spindle. If possible. Acts like a lock nut. And I’d want to have it really torqued.

I haven’t actually needed to do this. But thanks for raising the issue.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Texcaster

1262 posts in 1510 days


#4 posted 11-24-2016 07:43 AM



If you need to run the cutter in reverse (capability of a shaper that a router table doesn t have), I d suggest double-nutting on the spindle. If possible. Acts like a lock nut. And I d want to have it really torqued.

I haven t actually needed to do this. But thanks for raising the issue.

- runswithscissors

I’ve only had to cut in reverse once, can’t even remember the job. No reverse on mine, the wiring had to be shifted. Even though I have safety heads I didn’t like doing it.

Scratched into the isolation switch.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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sh2005

97 posts in 3073 days


#5 posted 11-26-2016 04:45 PM

Thank you all for the responses.
I am considering using a a shaper cutter on a custom made spindle, so thats why i was asking. So far, there is no plan to reverse the direction of the cutter.

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sh2005

97 posts in 3073 days


#6 posted 11-26-2016 04:47 PM

I should also mention that the custom spindle will not be used in a shaper, but a different type of machine.

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