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Forum topic by CordWood posted 11-21-2016 02:45 PM 1711 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CordWood

23 posts in 391 days


11-21-2016 02:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer planer mortiser combo combi combination scheppach german convertible buying

I am considering buying this German-made “Scheppach HM2- Kombi Machine”

https://nh.craigslist.org/tls/5854072583.html

I have a small shop, so having something that is a heavy-duty, powerful machine capable of jointing at just over 11” (the owner says it’ll handle up to 11-1/4”) is incredibly appealing to me. This machine also works off of 110v or 220v, which is not the case with most vintage wide bed jointers I have seen. I have no interest in trying to wire my basement shop with 3-phase 440v power!

So, presuming this is in good shape as the owner claims, is there any reason to avoid such a machine? Are combination machines generally inferior to single-purpose machines? Should I expect to get bad results or will I be frustrated by the conversion process?

Keep in mind I have a small shop so space saving is a big bonus for me.

I also prefer saving vintage tools rather than buying new. My favorite tool in my shop right now is a Craftsman radial arm saw I procured for $55. Not only is it more versatile than many of my other tools, it just looks so much cooler and reminds me of working on projects with my grandfather. It also reminds me that shop safety is not to be taken for granted!

Thanks for your answers in advance. Though I have read the LumberJocks forums for years, this is my first post. I apologize if I’m not following correct formatting, categorizing, or etiquette. Please let me know what corrections I can make so my posts are better in the future.

-- "What man has done, man can do."


13 replies so far

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#1 posted 11-21-2016 03:17 PM

I would go for it. I’ve owned similar machines
over the years and been pleased with them.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

901 posts in 1822 days


#2 posted 11-21-2016 04:00 PM

I’d go for it, but I’d consider rigging up some extensions for it, as the tables look extremely short for jointing.

-- Nick, “I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it.” – Vincent Van Gogh

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Julian

1239 posts in 2529 days


#3 posted 11-21-2016 05:35 PM

Buy it. Having a jointer 11” wide would be great.

-- Julian

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CordWood

23 posts in 391 days


#4 posted 11-21-2016 06:44 PM

Have any of you owned a Scheppach in specific?

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View CordWood's profile

CordWood

23 posts in 391 days


#5 posted 11-21-2016 07:20 PM



I would go for it. I ve owned similar machines
over the years and been pleased with them.

- Loren

Loren, did you own a Scheppach? Do you think these machines are all pretty similar? Anything to watch out for when doing the pre-purchase review before I fork over the cash?

-- "What man has done, man can do."

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Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#6 posted 11-21-2016 08:16 PM

I had an INCA, a Robland and a little Kity J/P
with a mortiser. The Robland also had a mortiser.

That general sort of machine, a combo jointer/planer
with the mortiser on the side is a common configuration
in Europe because space is at a premium there with
the old cramped buildings. They’ve only been
spottily sold in the USA for a range of reasons, particularly
Taiwan competition, but I’ve seen lots of similar
sorts of machines for sale on the secondhand market
over the years. Basically you get a wider than average
jointer table and a slot mortiser.

They aren’t that complicated but the wiring can be
since in some the mortiser has to reverse to work so
you’d probably want to see it running.

I think it’s a good bet because the paint is in good
shape and that indicates not-much wear.

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CordWood

23 posts in 391 days


#7 posted 11-21-2016 09:17 PM

Well, gentlemen, I think I’m going to go for it. It’s only a 90-minute drive to find out if I’m right or wrong on this.

-- "What man has done, man can do."

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CordWood

23 posts in 391 days


#8 posted 11-22-2016 11:34 PM

I got the jointer. The next step will be getting 220v outlet installed in my shop. I am running everything on 110v now.

If I’m bothering to get a 220v circuit installed, do you think I should convert my Ridgid table saw to 220v? Any advantages to doing this?

Does anyone have recommendations on products or methods for removing surface rust and then treating the cleaned metal surfaces?

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#9 posted 11-22-2016 11:53 PM

I use a wire brush and paste wax. I don’t recommend
sand paper as it actually cuts the metal. Some people
use a product called Evapo-rust but I’ve never used
in and have found wire brushing removes gritty surface
rust but leaves the iron patina intact.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

4533 posts in 2043 days


#10 posted 11-23-2016 12:17 AM

Its the sort of machine I would buy if available in Australia
The fact it has a horozontal boring capability is a plus, try buying a horiz Borer here too same story.

Rust removal …. well everybody has their preferences (and they are all here on LJs, and they all work ! so just search around read all the pros and cons then make a decision that suits you.

Being a 220 man and having worked at US bases with both voltages caused heaps of problems.

The same load on 220 V will mean a 50% (in theory) drop in the current.

-- Regards Robert

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#11 posted 11-23-2016 12:25 AM

There is a technical argument for converting a 110v
contractor saw to 220v if you have it available,
but in practical terms it’s not persuasive. You
won’t get any more oomph out of the saw
wiring it for 220. If it’s starting and running
fine at 110 I wouldn’t mess with it.

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CordWood

23 posts in 391 days


#12 posted 11-23-2016 09:18 AM

What do you think might of using “Blaster” and a wire brush on a drill to get out the rust?

To clean the cutting head should I remove entirely and set aside blades?

Should I worry about greasing the chain that adjusts the planing table height?

Is it worth in eating in Boeshield?

How do I even approach the motor or other bearings?

Thanks for the guiding wisdom guys!

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9633 posts in 3487 days


#13 posted 11-23-2016 06:00 PM

I have a bottle of outboard motor crankcase oil
I use for planer feedworks and chains. It’s
pretty viscous and doesn’t drip off too much…

I use a wire cup brush on an angle grinder with
no lubricant to clean oxidation off iron. I get
a look that I like with minimal fuss this way and
no liquid gunk to mess with. The iron retains
a patina. Some people like that, some don’t.

I wouldn’t bother doing any more than wire
brushing the cutter head and changing out the
knives if they were dull, personally.

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