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Forum topic by Bovine posted 07-23-2010 05:38 PM 1306 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bovine

114 posts in 2789 days


07-23-2010 05:38 PM

I’m having a problem with “lines” or gouge marks when I plane pine. I know this is really soft wood and it likely wouldn’t happen on hardwood. I’m wondering if anyone has any ideas why this is happening.

I’m using a Lee Valley Low Angle Smoother a 38-degree bevel and it is freshly sharpened. As I said before, the wood is pine and I’ve made sure that there is no foreign material between the sole of the plane and the wood.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"


13 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3038 days


#1 posted 07-23-2010 05:49 PM

I wonder about how deep your plane blade is set and if it is installed flat . Is it possible the bottom of the plane is not flat?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2503 days


#2 posted 07-23-2010 05:59 PM

The only thing I can think of is there is still a lot of moisture in the wood causing a depression. Is it happening on the ends or just the face? Do they look like gouges or more like a depression. Beyond that you may need an experts advice I have never planed pine. If it is more like a depression than you may be able to get those out with a wet cloth and a Iron.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View Bovine's profile

Bovine

114 posts in 2789 days


#3 posted 07-23-2010 06:00 PM

I’m less than the thickness of a sheet of paper off on each pass. I thought the back of the blade was flat, but you may be onto something. Might not hurt for me to lap it a bit.

The lines are about 1/16” – 1/8” wide so my original thought was debris. Didn’t think the back of the blade would cause that wide of streaking.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

View spclPatrolGroup's profile

spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2356 days


#4 posted 07-23-2010 06:04 PM

If you sharpen your iron perfecly straight across the corners can dig in, there should be a very slight chamfer on the sides, generally you press a little harder on each side when sharpening, you should only be able to tell that it is not straight across when you hold it to a straight edge.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2576 days


#5 posted 07-23-2010 06:24 PM

cuold be the edges of the plane front or back there needed to be slightly rounded with a file
my gess is , it in the front you have the problem
does your plane have adjustble mouth if so then look at the plate and how it´s maschined
on the body

just my 2 cent of gess

Dennis

View Bovine's profile

Bovine

114 posts in 2789 days


#6 posted 07-23-2010 09:50 PM

This isn’t coming from the blade edges…looks like coming from somewhere in the center of the plane as it goes accross the wood. wseand could be right in that it’s compression instead of gouges. They seem fairly wide.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2503 days


#7 posted 07-23-2010 10:05 PM

If you look at the knot on Pic one, the Gouge seems to be curved kind of out and away from the knot. That is only why I thought about it. Anything caused by the Plane, I would think would go straight through the knot.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View BertFlores58's profile

BertFlores58

1684 posts in 2383 days


#8 posted 07-24-2010 04:44 AM

Just a suggestion. Every pass you make, check that the mouth is clean and clear for the shavings to pass. Pine is very soft that a little splint of shavings jammed in the mouth will surely make a mark.

-- Bert

View fussy's profile

fussy

980 posts in 2512 days


#9 posted 07-28-2010 04:57 AM

Dave in Fargo has it right. You need a slight chamfer on the blade so the corners don’t dig in. All the woodworking magazines publish articles on how to do this. I was skeptical until I tried it and it worked. I was so happy I threw away the danged plane. Don’t have to sharpen sand paper.

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

891 posts in 2413 days


#10 posted 07-28-2010 06:37 PM

Good idea posting the pictures. This looks to me like your cap iron is either too far forward or not set right and you are getting some shavings jammed in it and causing a build up of shavings at the mouth of the plane. I see that your plane uses a cap iron on a bevel-up blade configuration and if it is set forward of that bevel, it will catch shavings there. Give that a try. Good Luck.

-- Mike

View markplusone's profile

markplusone

81 posts in 2416 days


#11 posted 07-31-2010 06:21 PM

Something you may want to do is check your planing form. Proper form is neccessary to cut smoothly. SStanding with your legs shoulder width apart and close to your work with it at a highth thats about waist level or a little higher is what you want. When you start your cut, all your pressure should be on the front of the plane. As you pass into the wood and more of the sole comes to bear on the surface you should transfer pressure to the back evenly. At the end of the cut, do it in reverse. Let up on the front of the plane so that by the time the blade “breaks” the edge, there is no pressure on the front at all. When you pull back for your next pass normally you would tilt the plane on edge and bring it back but on softwoods, better to just pick it up and not pull it back across the wood. And also make sure there is no shavings that are caught on the bottom because if they are stuck there, they will also create grooves in your work with the next pass. If you can bend your shavings in half and the “snap”, your too deep.

-- Dont carry that which you dont hold with.

View markplusone's profile

markplusone

81 posts in 2416 days


#12 posted 07-31-2010 06:23 PM

One more thought, a 38 deg. angle for the bevel seems awefully steep for a low angle plane. On my planes all are between 25-30 deg. 25 for smoothing planes and low angle planes and 30 for my scrub planes that need a heavier edge for their harder work.

-- Dont carry that which you dont hold with.

View Bovine's profile

Bovine

114 posts in 2789 days


#13 posted 07-31-2010 07:36 PM

Thanks for all of the advice! It’s definitely not the edges. After some more tries and paying close attention, the lines come from the middle of the blade. Not a chamfering issue.

I tend to think it’s a buildup of materials. I’m getting a lot more material alongside of the shavings and I think that’s just because Pine is such a soft wood. I don’t have that problem with hardwoods.

Mark, I truly appreciate the advice on form. I’m still pretty new to hand planing and have never been formally taught…not even a dad to watch. The 38 degrees include the frog. It’s a 25 degree blade with a 12 degree frog and a 1 degree micro bevel. I should have been more clear.

Anyway, thank you everyone for all of the advice. That’s one of the things I love about this place…all of the people willing to share their experience and ideas.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

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