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Gas Line question ..have a quandry

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Forum topic by CharlesNeil posted 11-18-2016 06:24 PM 786 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesNeil

2142 posts in 3704 days


11-18-2016 06:24 PM

WE are installing some propane gas radiant heaters in our shop, there are 2 30 ft sections and 1 20 ft section. These are the tube type and hang from the ceiling.
When the contractor came out and looked at everything he said the present copper lines needed to be replaced with
black iron, and stated that in his quote , now he is saying only the manifold needs to be black iron and the rest will be 1/2 ” copper… Its hard to find any info and was hoping some folks on here might have a little knowledge or experience with this.
Apologize for posting this here but wasnt sure where.


20 replies so far

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mrbob

182 posts in 402 days


#1 posted 11-18-2016 06:29 PM

Call your local building inspector.

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DocSavage45

8373 posts in 2676 days


#2 posted 11-18-2016 07:15 PM

Charles

There are two types of gas piping. Codes call for copper or the new insulated type. Copper has increased in price, but due to it’s inert qualities it is used outside of buildings and in buried applications. I did this installing a forced air furnace in my shop. (no galvanized pipe as it reacts to the gas)

You might be able to Google the codes for your area.

My city building inspector was always helpful and I double checked on line.

Hope this helps.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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CharlesNeil

2142 posts in 3704 days


#3 posted 11-18-2016 07:26 PM

we live in a map dot town, they didnt require a permit so getting an inspector isnt easy . I just have concerns , based on the contractors initial comments that all the copper had to be replaced with black iron, I have a newer building with this same type of heat, and its all run in Black iron. We have called and researched and it seems different localities have varying regulations, just thought some one on here might have some experience with this.
I will say that thus far the work done looks excellent, but then again, the contractors quote called for a turn key install, and then they hit me with ” electrical was not included”, Im just not feeling good about this, we have emailed our concerns and thus far nothing. We will see.
I dont mind paying for things to be right, I just want them, right. Oddly enough we had a building “EXPLODE” about 2 miles from us from an improper gas installation, ( not same contractor) , so I may be a bit paranoid .

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bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2900 days


#4 posted 11-18-2016 07:35 PM

I’d get a 2nd opinion.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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GregD

788 posts in 2969 days


#5 posted 11-18-2016 08:30 PM

I would start by asking the contractor to help me understand why they concluded that something has to be done a certain way. They should at least be able to give you a story that sounds sensible. Sometimes choices are driven by certain details specific to the job.

If you are uneasy about the story one option is contacting a company that does home inspections prior to a sale of a home for an independent assessment. They may charge you for their time, but there is a good chance that they have the appropriate expertise. It may be enough to repeat the contractor’s story over the phone to the inspector to get their impression.

-- Greg D.

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Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1048 days


#6 posted 11-18-2016 08:57 PM

My understanding from speaking to the good people at http://www.propaneproducts.com/parts-fittings-hoses-35-1.html and as a former general contractor. Copper underground to the building regulator; then black cast iron inside the building. This is the method that I would go with. Stay safe CN we need you……

-- Desert_Woodworker

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bold1

283 posts in 1680 days


#7 posted 11-19-2016 12:01 AM

You say there is no local government code or inspection, if that’s the case, then it should be installed to the gas suppliers specs. What do they tell you?

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Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1048 days


#8 posted 11-19-2016 01:55 AM



You say there is no local government code or inspection, if that s the case, then it should be installed to the gas suppliers specs. What do they tell you?

- bold1


This is the best approach
Also, Stumpy Nubbs did a video on installing a gas space heater and Mustashe Mike converted a garge into a shop- reach out to them, just an idea. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GMz9t22d0M

-- Desert_Woodworker

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mrbob

182 posts in 402 days


#9 posted 11-19-2016 02:05 AM


You say there is no local government code or inspection, if that s the case, then it should be installed to the gas suppliers specs. What do they tell you?

- bold1

This is the best approach
Also, Stumpy Nubbs did a video on installing a gas space heater and Mustashe Mike converted a garge into a shop- reach out to them, just an idea. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GMz9t22d0M

- Desert_Woodworker

To bad he used white Teflon tape, it deteriorates from the skunk oil in N G and Propane, turns to dust and can then plug your gas jets, Use the yellow tape, and no down tube for sediment either.

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mrbob

182 posts in 402 days


#10 posted 11-19-2016 02:28 AM

Not to mention the flexible hose is not code in many areas.

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Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1048 days


#11 posted 11-19-2016 02:33 AM

To bad he used white Teflon tape, it deteriorates from the skunk oil in N G and Propane, turns to dust and can then plug your gas jets, Use the yellow tape, and no down tube for sediment either.

- mrbob

Thanks for the info- Also, I would follow the building code or the manfacturer spects- Stumpy was just an “aside”

-- Desert_Woodworker

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StumpyNubs

7478 posts in 2634 days


#12 posted 11-19-2016 03:06 AM

To bad he used white Teflon tape, it deteriorates from the skunk oil in N G and Propane, turns to dust and can then plug your gas jets, Use the yellow tape, and no down tube for sediment either.

- mrbob

Wow, that was an old video. I was so young and good looking back then. I also used the white tape, which isn’t technically designed for gas lines. Some inspectors will write it up, others won’t. Frankly, the white tape is merely a lubricant, not a seal. The threads themselves seal the joint if they are tightly meshed, no matter what tape you use. The white tape merely helps you you reach that end. However, they do make tapes that serve as a second line of defense, acting as a seal should your thread leak. It makes good sense to use it. So, if I were to make this video nowadays, I would use yellow, not white.

For a good discussion among actual inspectors showing the wide range of opinions that exist about the tape, even among them, see this link-

-- Subscribe to "Stumpy Nubs Woodworking Journal"- One of the crafts' most unique publications: http://www.stumpynubs.com/

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mrbob

182 posts in 402 days


#13 posted 11-19-2016 03:19 AM

Stumby, thanks for the link, very interesting read and I learned a bit too.

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ajshobby

87 posts in 2141 days


#14 posted 11-19-2016 04:28 AM

Charles, All states and municipalities have different required codes as far as running gas piping goes. As long as you do not have any High Pressure Piping (over 15psi) and your regulators are properly sized and vented (if required) Soft copper or the newer corrugated piping (Gas Tite is one example) is fine to run into and through out a building. I would personally insist on the manifold supplying everything to be schedule 40 black iron pipe and then soft copper supplying the appliances. if you have specific questions on anything your contractor is doing i’m happy to give advice but my knowledge and licencing is from Minnesota and ASME codes and regulations.

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CharlesNeil

2142 posts in 3704 days


#15 posted 11-19-2016 01:46 PM

Thanks so much guys, this answers alot of my questions, while we do have building inspectors, this job didnt require a permit.
But I think we have it figured out and I agree copper outside, black iron inside and no white tape .. Got it, thanks so much again .

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