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Forum topic by OHFarm posted 11-17-2016 08:45 PM 783 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OHFarm

2 posts in 394 days


11-17-2016 08:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: white oak quartersawn old growth ray fleck timber oak traditional rustic

Hi All,

I’m new to the site and after some research came across this forum and figured this would be a good group to pose this question. My wife and I bought an old farm in northeast Ohio. The house was built in 1857 and is very structurally sound. Not much was done to the house since the 1920’s and so it’s out of our.l budget to be able to restore and add on. I tore out the plaster and lath on the first floor and low and behold, the house is a mortised timber frame made from quartersawn white oak. The floors are also the same, and are an inch thick with tongue and groove. The joists are all 2 3/4” x 7” x 12’ white oak and The studs are all 4”x4” many of which are quartersawn. The only nails in the place are in the floorboards. Much of the quartersawn materials shows prominent broad flecking/ curl.

So my question is- What is a reasonable price per board foot or per foot for this stuff if I were not to incorporate it into the new home we plan to build?

If anyone is interested in this wood, I live in northeast Ohio. Feel free to reply here or shoot me a PM if you’re interested. I’m happy to send photos if you’re interested.


4 replies so far

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2714 posts in 1318 days


#1 posted 11-21-2016 05:02 PM

Check sawmills in your area.

I’m getting ready to buy heavy flake 5/4 @ $4.60/5” wide & $5.50/7”

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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ClutteredShop

38 posts in 390 days


#2 posted 11-22-2016 10:11 PM

It’s not clear what you mean by “quarter sawn.” Typically, large timbers are made by sawing (or hewing) slabs off a round log. The resulting surfaces are, however, tangential, not radial. Similarly, only one surface of a 4×4 can be radial, unless it is taken from near the outside (bark) of a large tree, in which case, two sided may be approximately radial.
How was the lath held onto the framing, if not by nails? For anyone wanting to re-saw, nails are a significant issue. On the other hand, the best market for the wood may be for decorators who want to show off that the wood was previously used/

-- Cluttered Shop

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OHFarm

2 posts in 394 days


#3 posted 11-22-2016 11:28 PM



It s not clear what you mean by “quarter sawn.” Typically, large timbers are made by sawing (or hewing) slabs off a round log. The resulting surfaces are, however, tangential, not radial. Similarly, only one surface of a 4×4 can be radial, unless it is taken from near the outside (bark) of a large tree, in which case, two sided may be approximately radial.
How was the lath held onto the framing, if not by nails? For anyone wanting to re-saw, nails are a significant issue. On the other hand, the best market for the wood may be for decorators who want to show off that the wood was previously used/

- ClutteredShop

It’s my understanding that quartersawn is what they did back in the day as the trees were too large to cut completely through the tree, so they cut larger wedges out and then milled it into boards, studs etc. This process gives the wood grain heavy fleck/ flake in the grain. The lath is nailed in with small brads, most of which have come out with little effort. These are the only nails in the house, all of the joists are mortised into large beams. We might use the beams in the new construction and use some of the joists to build a large dining table.id still be interested in selling if some folks are interested in buying


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ClutteredShop

38 posts in 390 days


#4 posted 11-23-2016 03:07 AM

Quarter sawing just means making as many boards as possible parallel to or nearly parallel to the radius of the trunk, but to do it, they have to keep rotating the log in the carriage of the sawmill, which adds to time and cost. It is in distinction to “flat sawn,” in which they just mount the log on the carriage (usually after trimming off side slabs) and keep slicing off boards till there’s nothing left. Quarter sawn boards tend to be more stable (i.e., resistant to warping) and, in the case of oak, very beautiful because the plane of the cut runs parallel to the medullary rays, exposing them as mirror-like patches.

Good luck on your rebuild. If you decide to reuse some of that old oak in new construction, I think you’ll find that it is quite difficult to nail into (assuming you’re not going to use mortise-and-tenon joinery). You’ll probably find you have to pre-drill for nailing.

-- Cluttered Shop

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