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Forum topic by Garret D., Rock Run posted 11-17-2016 06:35 PM 946 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Garret D., Rock Run

72 posts in 1635 days


11-17-2016 06:35 PM

So now that I have the wood shop I need to start on the project list, the first item that I’m going to start with it’s going to be a new set of saw horses. Saw horses always seem like a great starting point when your at a woodworking plateau.

When I’m making a new set of saw horses I like to compare them to the saw horses of the past and see the changes in ideas, techniques and skill level. For me the sawhorse represents the baseline of my woodworking.

The brilliant thing about sawhorse as as there’s really as many different sawhorse designs as there are Woodworkers. So come on guys what do your saw horses look like?


18 replies so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14857 posts in 2457 days


#1 posted 11-17-2016 06:38 PM

I’d call this C. Schwarz’ 1st Generation sawbench.

It’s the same height height as my toolchest, but is a separate thing entirely from the (many) pairs of sawhorses that are scattered around the shop.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Garret D., Rock Run

72 posts in 1635 days


#2 posted 11-17-2016 07:00 PM



I d call this C. Schwarz 1st …

Brilliant. Do you have a pic of the tool chest?

View Douglas's profile

Douglas

422 posts in 2399 days


#3 posted 11-17-2016 07:20 PM

I made a C Schwarz style saw bench, and I hate it. It looks cool, and is great as a bench, but I hate the splayed legs. Those legs seem to interfere with sawing all the time. I’m going to replace it with a bench that has straight vertical legs, and maybe a split top.

-- Douglas in Chicago - https://dcwwoodworks.com

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bondogaposis

4480 posts in 2190 days


#4 posted 11-17-2016 08:40 PM

I like these I built them a few years ago and they have held up really well. You can make the pair from 5 2×4’s about $10 just about anywhere. Cheap and sturdy, what is not to like?

-- Bondo Gaposis

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MrRon

4496 posts in 3082 days


#5 posted 11-17-2016 09:27 PM

here is the sawhorse I use. It has a wide top for more stability. They are lightweight, but very strong. https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/ogt29kg.jpg!

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DMC1903

282 posts in 2166 days


#6 posted 11-17-2016 09:38 PM

I opted to purchase a couple of Dewalt collapsible sawhorse’s, they are lightweight and store easily and a nice height.

View mike02130's profile

mike02130

167 posts in 511 days


#7 posted 11-17-2016 09:40 PM

Mine are buried and not photo available. I have a few pairs of carpenter type horses. I made one longer and wider than the other so they can stack together.

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

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Garret D., Rock Run

72 posts in 1635 days


#8 posted 11-17-2016 09:46 PM


I d call this C. Schwarz 1st …

Brilliant. Do you have a pic of the tool chest?

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

19802 posts in 2944 days


#9 posted 11-17-2016 10:14 PM

hi Garret,
Mine are buried too, but they have steel brackets that I made that you bolt 4 2×4 legs to and then one 30” 2×4 on edge across the top. They are fixed and don’t fold but they stack on top of each other pretty good and that is where they are now- stacked in the outback shed!!

Cheers,.......................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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Garret D., Rock Run

72 posts in 1635 days


#10 posted 11-18-2016 12:23 AM



hi Garret,
Mine are buried too, but they have steel brackets that I made that you bolt 4 2×4 legs to and then one 30” ...

- Jim Jakosh

Mathias Wandel did a deconstruction video of something like that model of sawhorse. I seem to remember him being favorably impressed.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

14857 posts in 2457 days


#11 posted 11-18-2016 12:58 AM

Garret, you’ll find a couple hundred pics of the chest in it’s various forms in the project post and blog series here on LJs…

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

239 posts in 2629 days


#12 posted 11-18-2016 01:20 AM

So, these aren’t pretty anymore, but I like this design a lot. I made these about 30 years ago. The main beam is an I beam construction, and I like how the legs tuck in under the top of the beam so they are in pure compression. As a result, the connection between the legs and the main beam isn’t really in shear stress. They are as strong as heck and easy to make. The little vertical pieces to hold logs on top were added later.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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Garret D., Rock Run

72 posts in 1635 days


#13 posted 11-18-2016 01:55 AM



So, these aren t pretty anymore, but I like this design a lot. I made these about 30 years ago. ...
- BobAnderton

Oh nice. So you are using the Alaskan Mill up on that. That is a pretty sweet setup.

View Garret D., Rock Run's profile

Garret D., Rock Run

72 posts in 1635 days


#14 posted 11-18-2016 01:57 AM



Garret, you ll find a couple hundred pics of the chest in it s various forms in the project post and blog series here on LJs…

- Smitty_Cabinetshop

That’s one great piece of shop infrastructure there. Pretty awesome.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1789 posts in 486 days


#15 posted 11-19-2016 12:22 AM

I use a not-so-fancy split top saw bench. This is great for ripping! Made mine 19-1/4” high …
 

 
... to line up with the wooden casket stands salvaged from the funeral home!
 

 
Sorry it’s so dark back there …

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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