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Forum topic by thehig posted 11-16-2016 05:31 PM 435 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thehig

1 post in 393 days


11-16-2016 05:31 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hello All,

I am new to woodworking but I have a problem and could use some advice. My front door has been gouged up by dogs. Replacement is expensive as the door is an odd size 34” wide. Is there a planer that would be able to resurface something that wide?

Appreciate any advice or suggestions.

Thanks!

Tom


7 replies so far

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OnhillWW

112 posts in 1068 days


#1 posted 11-16-2016 10:04 PM

W/o pictures and assuming that this is a flat wood door that you do not want to paint: dog scratching may be lessened by steaming the affected areas and raising the grain (lightly sand area prior to steaming to expose raw wood. Cover small areas with a moist towel and heat with a hot iron, 2 or more attempts may be needed to get maximum effect, let dry. Get a hold of a 6” Random orbital sander and level affected areas the best you can trying to blend into non-affected regions of the door so that you don’t replace scratches with divots. May not be perfect but could be much better. Can’t really say w/o seeing pictures.

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jerryminer

800 posts in 1277 days


#2 posted 11-17-2016 02:58 AM

We need to know more about the construction of the door. I have successfully cut off 1/8” from the face of a door rail (in a frame-and-panel door) with a router and let in a new piece.

So—- slab door, frame-and panel…?? Pics?

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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GR8HUNTER

2954 posts in 548 days


#3 posted 11-17-2016 04:44 PM

pictures or it DID NOT HAPPEN please

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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ArtMann

685 posts in 651 days


#4 posted 11-17-2016 04:54 PM

Not long ago, I helped a guy turn a section of bowling alley into a workbench top. We carried the slab to a millwork company that had a huge wide belt sander. They ran it through about 4 times and it was flat and without blemish. Maybe you can find a business like that or a cabinet shop to do the coarse surfacing for you and you can finish it up with a ROS.

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rwe2156

2711 posts in 1316 days


#5 posted 11-17-2016 06:28 PM

Without know how deep the dings are, its hard to advise.

One option would be remove the paint or finish, bondo all the dents, sand and paint.

Or you can buy a 36” wide door are a ReStor or Thrift store and trim it down. Or you may even find a 34” door.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Cooler

299 posts in 679 days


#6 posted 11-17-2016 06:42 PM



Without know how deep the dings are, its hard to advise.

One option would be remove the paint or finish, bondo all the dents, sand and paint.

Or you can buy a 36” wide door are a ReStor or Thrift store and trim it down. Or you may even find a 34” door.

- rwe2156

Another would be move the paint or finish, bondo all the dents, sand and re-skin. They sell wide veneers for doors (Lowes carries red oak and birch); some places sell “door skins” which is about 1/8” thick plywood with a veneer surface.

Exotic veneers are available: http://veneers.com/doors/

Constantines sells veneers with a self adhesive backing in exotic flavors (like genuine burl, and South American rosewood): http://www.constantines.com/peel-n-stick.aspx

I would check with ML Condon too: http://www.condonlumber.net/Plywood.html

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2780 days


#7 posted 11-17-2016 07:16 PM

When need arises, I’m a fan of aluminum, brass or metal like we see on doors that get kicked, pushed by carts and so on. Done right, they play well with wood. Of course, they always play fine with metal or glass.

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