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Stanley plane soles out of square

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Forum topic by Marn64 posted 11-16-2016 01:21 AM 881 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marn64

295 posts in 621 days


11-16-2016 01:21 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane sole

Hey everybody,
So I was tending to my planes today and I noticed that my two favorite jointing planes, my 1874 Stanley no 6 and no 7, have soles out of square with the sides. This skew is worse on the no 6 than the 7. I was thinking that I could carbide scrape the soles down, but I am concerned that that would make the sole too thin and fragile. Any thoughts on this?

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee


12 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

5453 posts in 2046 days


#1 posted 11-16-2016 02:40 AM

Why do you need a sole square to the sides on a jointer plane? As long as the sole is flat enough to make a flat surface (coplanar at the toe, heel and front of mouth) then its a usable plane. I wouldn’t worry about it.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1175 posts in 1633 days


#2 posted 11-16-2016 03:03 AM

I can’t believe it how could that happen.
You should box them up and send it back to the factory.
I can give the address if you need it.:)

Aj

-- Aj

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4510 posts in 974 days


#3 posted 11-16-2016 03:28 AM

Definitely don’t scrape the soles. It will open the mouths up and thinning the sole may lead to cracks or breaks.


Why do you need a sole square to the sides on a jointer plane? As long as the sole is flat enough to make a flat surface (coplanar at the toe, heel and front of mouth) then its a usable plane. I wouldn t worry about it.

- JayT

Yeah, that^. I doubt if any of my planes are square but I don’t know. Why don’t I know? ‘Cause I’ve never had occassion to care ;-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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unbob

800 posts in 1739 days


#4 posted 11-16-2016 06:48 AM

Have you taken an accurate square and tested the sides? What I see is the unfinished top not level with the bottom.
Anyway I am totally for scraping the planes sole flat, not the roll over the edges sanding that is called lapping in the woodworking world.
Anyway, scraping a plane sole is very worthwhile in my opinion, I have hand scraped more then a dozen, as so.

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HokieKen

4510 posts in 974 days


#5 posted 11-16-2016 10:37 AM

Now that’s some dedication unbob;-p. Although, it should be pointed out to the poster that printing and scraping to remove high spots as unbob shows is much easier than re-establishing an entire surface in a new plane. If you were going to the trouble, I’d mill it first then scrape.

All that said, I still stand by my first post.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2329 days


#6 posted 11-16-2016 11:41 AM

Ditto most of the above. It only matters if you use a shooting board, so pick a different plane for that. If you insist on having that squared up, I’d find someone with a machine shop to do it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

14843 posts in 2454 days


#7 posted 11-16-2016 01:09 PM

My guess is someone felt they had to lap them flat, and what you have is the result of those efforts.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18614 posts in 2519 days


#8 posted 11-16-2016 02:06 PM

Or…..just a 100+ years of wear. About the only reason to have the sides of a jointer plane square to the sole is IF you have a jointer fence in use…..even then, you can square the fence to the sole with the adjustments provide on the fence.

Does the two planes do their jobs? If yes….leave them alone. The wood you use these planes on will never know IF someone has “printed” the soles and sides to be perfect.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

295 posts in 621 days


#9 posted 11-17-2016 01:07 AM

UPDATE
So I took my try square and checked the sole with the sides…unbob was right, its the top of the casting that is skewed, not the sole or the sides. I actually can’t say I am too surprised, the Stanley foundry in New Britain had only been making planes for 6 years when my plane was cast, and there’s no way they operated with a 1mm tolerance back then.

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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unbob

800 posts in 1739 days


#10 posted 11-17-2016 05:54 AM



Now that s some dedication unbob;-p. Although, it should be pointed out to the poster that printing and scraping to remove high spots as unbob shows is much easier than re-establishing an entire surface in a new plane. If you were going to the trouble, I d mill it first then scrape.

All that said, I still stand by my first post.

- HokieKen

Most of my handplanes, I had to mill “flycutter”, then scrape the last few thou flat, it goes pretty fast. Worth the effort if you cant afford a set of LN planes. However, I am glad I have that behind me. I am positive when the planes were new, they were flat. The thinness, and odd shape of the sole goes out of true over time from stresses within the casting. Over the years, the cast iron changes from thin harder casting to thicker softer castings. Pretty much they all warp out of true, I do have a few exceptions that needed very little work.

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HokieKen

4510 posts in 974 days


#11 posted 11-17-2016 02:10 PM


Most of my handplanes, I had to mill “flycutter”, then scrape the last few thou flat, it goes pretty fast. Worth the effort if you cant afford a set of LN planes. However, I am glad I have that behind me. I am positive when the planes were new, they were flat. The thinness, and odd shape of the sole goes out of true over time from stresses within the casting. Over the years, the cast iron changes from thin harder casting to thicker softer castings. Pretty much they all warp out of true, I do have a few exceptions that needed very little work.

- unbob

Man I love machinists :-) (not being a smart-ass, I was a machinist for about a decade until I got my degree).

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View simmo's profile

simmo

60 posts in 3307 days


#12 posted 11-20-2016 07:29 PM

Even if the sides were precisely square to the sole it would have have a very precisely ground and honed blade to have any real effect on its use, these were mass produced items and the processes of the time and the workers production targets coupled with low quality control was probably the main reason for the asymmetry, if the plane had been ground or warped significantly the mouth of the plane would bear witness to this, just my opinion,
Chris

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