LumberJocks

Wagon vise vs. tail vise

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by Ben posted 11-15-2016 10:39 PM 2098 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Ben's profile

Ben

356 posts in 2697 days


11-15-2016 10:39 PM

Hoping some of you can weigh in on the pros/cons of each and what you personally use and why.

I prefer the looks of the traditional tail vise, and I like the open jaw it creates.

But I’m wondering – can the throat of a wagon vise function like a moxon vise for dovetails? For clamping a board with the end grain facing up?

Thanks


26 replies so far

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1794 posts in 487 days


#1 posted 11-15-2016 11:05 PM


Hoping some of you can weigh in on the pros/cons of each and what you personally use and why.

I prefer the looks of the traditional tail vise, and I like the open jaw it creates.

But I m wondering – can the throat of a wagon vise function like a moxon vise for dovetails? For clamping a board with the end grain facing up?

Thanks

- Ben

Mine cannot …
 

 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9115 posts in 2132 days


#2 posted 11-15-2016 11:21 PM

Ben it can hold boards for dovetailing/endgrain up, if you build it large enough. Mine can, though I used it that way to try it out before, I’ve got a bench-top-moxon I prefer instead (gets them up a little higher)

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4483 posts in 2191 days


#3 posted 11-16-2016 12:06 AM

I have a wagon vise like Mos. I can put narrow drawer sides in the opening for dovetails. I can also put them in my leg vise which is what I usually do. I recently built a Moxon vise and here’s why. My bench top is 32” high and that is the perfect height for me for planing. But for cutting dovetails I prefer to raise the work up a few inches and that is what my Moxon vise does is bring the work up to 36” from the floor a more comfortable height for cutting dovetails.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Ben's profile

Ben

356 posts in 2697 days


#4 posted 11-16-2016 12:55 AM

Thanks, and nice benches fellas.
Mos, are you happy with yours, and glad you went with round dogs? What kind of hardware/screw do you have on yours?

I think I’m leaning towards the wagon vise, not so much for dovetailing, but to avoid sagging in tail vise, and a more usable corner of the bench top.

I’m not crazy about the aesthetics of the BC handwheels (for my traditionally-styled bench). Would love to find a way to put a custom forged iron handle on modern hardware with steel screw. Any of you guys do this?

Thanks

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9115 posts in 2132 days


#5 posted 11-16-2016 01:57 AM

I made a wooden screw using a wood threading kit http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/12T17/woodthreading-kit-112-x-6-tpi.aspx

I am still happy with my wagon vise, and the round dogs are a lot easier to install (just drill some holes once the bench is done). It also means I can take a dog out and use that hole with my hold fasts if I need to, but that doesn’t happen very frequently.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1263 posts in 1514 days


#6 posted 11-16-2016 09:26 AM

The tail vise is very versatile, my face vise very seldom even gets a look in.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4521 posts in 979 days


#7 posted 11-16-2016 10:28 AM

Why not combine the two? That would eliminate sagging in the tail vise and add some functionality to the wagon.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Ben's profile

Ben

356 posts in 2697 days


#8 posted 11-16-2016 12:03 PM

Texcaster – that’s pretty sweet, and what a cool looking shop!
Where did you get that cool iron hardware for the tail vise?

And Hokie, what do you mean exactly by combining the two?

Thanks.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4521 posts in 979 days


#9 posted 11-16-2016 02:16 PM



And Hokie, what do you mean exactly by combining the two?

Thanks.

- Ben

I’m thinking like a traditional tail vise like Texcaster’s but instead of having it go all the way to the front of the bench, have the “L” section captured in the benchtop like a wagon vise. Then you can use guides on both sides of the “L” which would go a long way to preventing sagging and you’d still have the front corner of the bench present.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View WillliamMSP's profile

WillliamMSP

1084 posts in 1444 days


#10 posted 11-16-2016 02:33 PM



The tail vise is very versatile, my face vise very seldom even gets a look in.


- Texcaster

Can we talk about the raven, instead?! Corvids are so damn cool – I’m envious of anyone with a raven friend.

-- Practice makes less sucky. (Bill, Minneapolis, MN)

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2717 posts in 1321 days


#11 posted 11-16-2016 02:35 PM

Texcaster illustrates a major advantage of traditional tailvise.

IME nothing beats this vise + a bench slave for tuning up drawers.

Whats a bench slave? Here ya go:

Sagging is definitely the big issue. To be expected. How many tail vises will you ever build in your lifetime? Because of this, I would recommend either the tail vise or sliding tail vise hardware kits from Lee Valley.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1263 posts in 1514 days


#12 posted 11-16-2016 09:56 PM

Texcaster – that’s pretty sweet, and what a cool looking shop!
Where did you get that cool iron hardware for the tail vise?

And Hokie, what do you mean exactly by combining the two?

Thanks.

Cheers Ben, the screw is vintage and came from a blacksmith stump/leg vise.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1263 posts in 1514 days


#13 posted 11-16-2016 10:12 PM

I m thinking like a traditional tail vise like Texcaster s but instead of having it go all the way to the front of the bench, have the “L” section captured in the benchtop like a wagon vise. Then you can use guides on both sides of the “L” which would go a long way to preventing sagging and you d still have the front corner of the bench present.

- HokieKen

Ken, I built a bench like the one you suggest and was happy with it for years. It was only meant to be temporary. Funnily enough, an image of it turned up on a search for “sagging tail vises”. The link discusses improvements.

http://lumberjocks.com/Texcaster/blog/41409

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1263 posts in 1514 days


#14 posted 11-16-2016 10:25 PM

Can we talk about the raven, instead?! Corvids are so damn cool – I m envious of anyone with a raven friend.

- WillliamMSP

William, the Austarlian Magpies and Butcher Birds are genus Cracticus. Both are very friendly and always around with a bit of encouragment. My blogs are brimming with both.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_magpie

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1263 posts in 1514 days


#15 posted 11-16-2016 10:41 PM

I’m having trouble getting this maggie into the above post. I’ll try again later.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com