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Anyone have any knowledge about this Keen Kutter transition plane?

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Forum topic by bondogaposis posted 11-15-2016 02:46 PM 510 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2187 days


11-15-2016 02:46 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

I just picked this up at an antique store. I paid $25, it is in excellent shape so I though that was worth it. I flattened the sole and sharpened the cutter and it turned out to be a sweet little smoother. The iron is thicker than the standard Stanleys that I own and it seems to be better steel. Does anyone know the history of Keen Kutter and how old this plane might be?

-- Bondo Gaposis


9 replies so far

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Ron Aylor

1775 posts in 483 days


#1 posted 11-15-2016 03:58 PM

No authority of course, but I read somewhere that Keen Kutter Planes marked with a single letter and then the # size are actually early style Bedrock planes made under contract by Stanley. Sargent and later Ohio made the later versions with the Mahogany handles and 4 digit # or the no number varieties. (???)

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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Mosquito

9103 posts in 2128 days


#2 posted 11-15-2016 04:47 PM

I can get you more info once I get home from work, if no one else does Bondo.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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bandit571

18615 posts in 2519 days


#3 posted 11-15-2016 04:54 PM

You MIGHT look at the front end of the wood body, as the makers would stamp their name and the plane’s model number there…

Looks like an Ohio Tool Co. No. 022…..But might also be a Union made one. Would need to see the lever cap.

Stanley made one like this, called it a No. 22.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

14843 posts in 2454 days


#4 posted 11-15-2016 06:30 PM

History of Keen Kutter can be found here.

http://www.thckk.org/history/simmons-hdwe.pdf

“Who made it” might be established by comparing the lateral adjustment lever with the ones Don references on his TTT site.

https://timetestedtools.wordpress.com/2014/03/01/quickly-identify-your-hand-plane/

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Mosquito

9103 posts in 2128 days


#5 posted 11-15-2016 06:41 PM

The tricky part with the lateral adjusters is that even the Stanley made single K series (K3, K4, etc) had the twisted lateral adjustment lever, indicative of Ohio/Union. I’m fairly certain the plane in question here would have been made by Ohio tools, but I’ll look up what I can in my Keen Kutter book when I get home

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2187 days


#6 posted 11-15-2016 08:06 PM

Thank for the help so far. There are no markings on either end of the body. If you look at the photo there is burn mark in the side, like it got too close to a heat source, right there it is stamped Keen Kutter w/ a triangular logo. The lateral adjuster is twisted, you can see in the photo below. On the iron the Keen Kutter logo is stamped and it says; E C Simmons across the top, KEEN KUTTER in the middle and St. Louis USA on the bottom of the logo. Here are some photos of the lateral adjuster and iron. My camera is not working like it should and I can’t get good close ups, like I want.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Mosquito

9103 posts in 2128 days


#7 posted 11-15-2016 11:04 PM

Looks like it was most likely made by Ohio Tools.

Depending on the width of the iron it’s either a KK23 or KK24, which are 1-3/4 or 2” wide respectively. Both offered between 1906-1912. Interestingly the KK23 is listed as 9” long, and the KK24 at 8” long. For some reason I would have expected that the other way around. Originally KK23/24 and the logo would have been incised on the left side of the wood base. Since you indicated there was a logo on the side and it has a thicker iron, I’m rather confident this is your plane.

For those curious, there was also a K range of transitional planes, made from 1913-1941 by Stanley, but the logos/model was stamped on the front of the plane for those. Also non-tapered irons, per the usual for Stanley.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2187 days


#8 posted 11-15-2016 11:53 PM

Ok, it measures 8” long and the iron is 2” wide so KK24 it is. Thanks Mos. Thanks Smitty for the reference info, judging by the adjuster it was made by Ohio Tool. Thanks all, you guys know your stuff.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Mosquito

9103 posts in 2128 days


#9 posted 11-16-2016 12:09 AM

I had a book to confirm the sizes, # and date :-)

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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