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Dodging purchases: planer, band saw, jointer?

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Forum topic by huyz posted 11-14-2016 09:43 PM 600 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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huyz

58 posts in 700 days


11-14-2016 09:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer band saw jointer rough lumber

Hey guys and thank you for all your help you’ve given so far!

I’m trying to make hardwood strips for a project and keep running into the tool $ sinkhole.

I want to cut ~40 strips of wood about say… 1.75” x 0.40” x 20”. So started doing some research about this and was going to just buy something like 5/4 hardwood and cut it down.

But I realized I’m going to lose something like 60%+ of the wood to my table saw kerf making these cuts. And was also reading much of these hardwoods from the lumber shop, despite being S2S still need to be planed when brought home. I’ve dealt with mostly plywood so far, kiln dried white wood, and just chosen the flattest hardwoods I could at the shop and put up with how warped they may be.

Seems like for the long run, the way to go is buy rough lumber, run it through a planer, then cut strips through a band saw. Would I also need a jointer? Is there a better way to go about this? If so then it would be just a debate of using the machinery long enough to pay off the costs or not.

Thanks for your help everyone.


6 replies so far

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1566 posts in 3600 days


#1 posted 11-14-2016 10:56 PM

I work with a lot of rough sawn (Wood Mizer) boards. Generally I rough cut them to size and then get out the hand plane to remove any twist or cup. A used #5 Stanley hand plane with clean up TLC and sharpening would handle this job quickly.

You can then re-saw your flattened board to the proper thickness on a band saw and clean up the saw marks with the hand plane.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2652 days


#2 posted 11-14-2016 11:44 PM

You are absolutely right, the most cost effective method is to buy rough sawn lumber and finish mill it yourself.
You will need a jointer to work rough sawn boards. Some guys get a planer first, because you could at least buy S3S lumber and make it thinner. But ultimately it takes a jointer, planer, and tablesaw to mill S4S lumber.

I question the math about losing 60% of your lumber. If the strips are .4” wide, and a full kerf saw blade is .125, that would be more like 30% waste (more or less). Thin kerf blades are nice if you are concerned about getting the most you can out of your lumber.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Dabcan's profile

Dabcan

255 posts in 2510 days


#3 posted 11-15-2016 12:31 AM

I would do it with a planer jointer and bandsaw. You could use a table saw, and while you waste more wood because of the kerf, the bandsaw cut may need more planing to clean up. Something to remember is that cheap bandsaws aren’t worth buying. They aren’t adjustable enough to get a straight cut and will just frustrate you.

Depending on how much woodworking you are planning on doing, you might be best off finding a coop workshop where you can rent time on these machines instead of buying them

-- @craftcollectif , http://www.craftcollective.ca, https://www.etsy.com/shop/craftcollective?

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huyz

58 posts in 700 days


#4 posted 11-15-2016 12:56 AM



You are absolutely right, the most cost effective method is to buy rough sawn lumber and finish mill it yourself.
You will need a jointer to work rough sawn boards. Some guys get a planer first, because you could at least buy S3S lumber and make it thinner. But ultimately it takes a jointer, planer, and tablesaw to mill S4S lumber.

- pintodeluxe

Thanks for the reply! I don’t think I’ve seen S3S at my local mills but will look more closely next time.

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huyz

58 posts in 700 days


#5 posted 11-15-2016 12:58 AM


I would do it with a planer jointer and bandsaw. You could use a table saw, and while you waste more wood because of the kerf, the bandsaw cut may need more planing to clean up. Something to remember is that cheap bandsaws aren t worth buying. They aren t adjustable enough to get a straight cut and will just frustrate you.

Depending on how much woodworking you are planning on doing, you might be best off finding a coop workshop where you can rent time on these machines instead of buying them

- Dabcan

Thank you for the tips, I didn’t realize bandsaw cuts would need cleaning up O_O.

And nice idea on the coop! Totally forgot there’s one near me—I just gotta take their safety class before I can sign up for rentals.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9635 posts in 3487 days


#6 posted 11-15-2016 01:06 AM

I’d buy 8/4, saw on edge straight on the table
saw, clean up a little with a jack plane to
remove saw marks, then band saw the thickness
you want using a rip blade. Clean up with a
jack plane.

You’ll still need the band saw. You can make
a rip fence if you have to.

Strips .40” thick are kind of flexible but if you
need them perfectly flat and square you’ll want
to carefully straighten the edge of the board
you are ripping strips from often. With some
care this can be done with the jack plane.

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