LumberJocks

Painting new cabinets

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by bdresch posted 11-13-2016 07:43 PM 746 views 2 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View bdresch's profile

bdresch

133 posts in 1442 days


11-13-2016 07:43 PM

I am currently doing built in cabinets for my laundry room. I am building them from birch ply and poplar with the intent of painting white. I have only ever done cabinets in hardwood and stained, so I need some help choosing a finish. What is the best route to go to get a durable white finish? I have also never used a gun, so if there is a good finish compatible with a hvlp gun, this would be a good excuse for me a to buy one finally.


19 replies so far

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1009 posts in 2118 days


#1 posted 11-13-2016 10:07 PM

I just used SW ProClassic Semigloss Water Based Acrylic Alkyd for my kitchen cabinets. I have a budget HVLP (Wagner Control Spray Max) that has worked really well for me doing water based dye and poly. I was hesitant to use it for the cabinets, but I figured I would give it a try. It exceeded my expectations. I won’t call the finish factory quality, but I would be really surprised if anyone noticed on their own that they were sprayed by me.

The idea behind the acrylic alkyd paints is that they have many of the benefits of oil based alkyd paints, like hard finish, no blocking (stickiness on latex paint), yet they don’t yellow over time like the oil based ones.

The cabinets have been hung and cured (30 days to fully cure) for about a month, so I can’t yet speak on longterm durability, but I can confirm the finish is very hard and easy to clean.

I actually hung them right away and just prayed my kids wouldn’t destroy them as they cured. That was about 2 months ago. Got lucky on that one!

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1009 posts in 2118 days


#2 posted 11-13-2016 10:07 PM

Here is my project post of it: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/273882

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

2951 posts in 546 days


#3 posted 11-13-2016 10:53 PM

stain it every1 will be much happier LOL

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6420 posts in 3201 days


#4 posted 11-14-2016 06:09 AM

Not to be contrary, when I build something that I am going to paint, I use MDO plywood as it paints beautifully and it never has any surface imperfections.
Secondly for a humid environment I use RustOleum high gloss enamal.

But that’s just me and my way of doing it.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#5 posted 11-14-2016 12:19 PM

I’ve done one set of cabinets that were painted, and it’s a lot more work than staining and top coating. Any imperfections will telegraph through the paint…including wood grain. Using MDO would not be a bad idea. In my case the door panels were MDO, but the carcase was built with a high quality cabinet grade maple ply. Priming with Zinnser BIN smoothed the surface out. Joe is correct that the acrylic enamels will give you a very nice durable finish, and save you the headache of using oil based enamels. They are well worth considering. In my case I used oil based Olympic, but oil based paints are getting harder and harder to find.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1009 posts in 2118 days


#6 posted 11-14-2016 02:18 PM

MDO would be a good idea for panels. I used 1/4” MDF. It took the paint very well.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 677 days


#7 posted 11-14-2016 04:29 PM

The only issue with MDF is that the machined edges will “raise grain” if painted with a water-based paint.

I prime with Bin Zinnsser shellac based primer to eliminate that issue. You can just spot “prime” with either Bin or Sealcoat on just the machined edges. The undisturbed flat surfaces finish beautifully.

I just painted some kitchen cabinets with GF “Milk paint” an immitation milk paint. And then top-coated with clear poly. I think that clear poly is a tougher finish and will stay clean longer. The GF milk paint is remarkable for drying entirely free of brushstrokes. I compared it with S-W’s best flat finish and it definitely laid down a smoother and more blemish free finish. Indeed it looked like it had been sprayed on in a professional cabinet shop, and not brushed on with foam brushes in my basement. It will scuff easily so you do have to top coat, but a really nice finish.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1009 posts in 2118 days


#8 posted 11-14-2016 05:14 PM



The only issue with MDF is that the machined edges will “raise grain” if painted with a water-based paint.

I prime with Bin Zinnsser shellac based primer to eliminate that issue. You can just spot “prime” with either Bin or Sealcoat on just the machined edges. The undisturbed flat surfaces finish beautifully.

I just painted some kitchen cabinets with GF “Milk paint” an immitation milk paint. And then top-coated with clear poly. I think that clear poly is a tougher finish and will stay clean longer. The GF milk paint is remarkable for drying entirely free of brushstrokes. I compared it with S-W s best flat finish and it definitely laid down a smoother and more blemish free finish. Indeed it looked like it had been sprayed on in a professional cabinet shop, and not brushed on with foam brushes in my basement. It will scuff easily so you do have to top coat, but a really nice finish.

- Cooler

I bet you spent a lot less than I did on that paint too! I thought about that milk paint, but chickened out. I was worried that the grain would show through too much. Glad to hear it works well. I’ll try it in the future.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 677 days


#9 posted 11-14-2016 05:25 PM


The only issue with MDF is that the machined edges will “raise grain” if painted with a water-based paint.

I prime with Bin Zinnsser shellac based primer to eliminate that issue. You can just spot “prime” with either Bin or Sealcoat on just the machined edges. The undisturbed flat surfaces finish beautifully.

I just painted some kitchen cabinets with GF “Milk paint” an immitation milk paint. And then top-coated with clear poly. I think that clear poly is a tougher finish and will stay clean longer. The GF milk paint is remarkable for drying entirely free of brushstrokes. I compared it with S-W s best flat finish and it definitely laid down a smoother and more blemish free finish. Indeed it looked like it had been sprayed on in a professional cabinet shop, and not brushed on with foam brushes in my basement. It will scuff easily so you do have to top coat, but a really nice finish.

- Cooler

I bet you spent a lot less than I did on that paint too! I thought about that milk paint, but chickened out. I was worried that the grain would show through too much. Glad to hear it works well. I ll try it in the future.

- SuperCubber

Of all the brushed finishes I’ve ever used this left the most perfectly even and smooth result. No brush marks at all. But use a foam brush to “mop” up the accumulation in the corners of the stiles and rails.

I did some black cabinets and I wanted a matte finish, but the clear coats with dulling agents made the black finish look more muddy than matte. Completely unacceptable. So for dark colors the dullest I would use is semi-gloss. For white I think it would work with a flat finish.

I was tempted to just use the black without a top coat but the sample board showed scuffing very easily—not an acceptable result for a kitchen cabinet. The paint is listed as “interior/exterior” finish.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6420 posts in 3201 days


#10 posted 11-14-2016 06:34 PM

I still prefer MDO over MDF because MDO is lighter, stronger, the edges can be filled or covered much easier, and other than a tack rag the surface of MDO needs virtually no additional treatment, just apply paint.
MDO also doesn’t create as much airborne dust as does MDF.
Of course MDO costs more than MDF.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1009 posts in 2118 days


#11 posted 11-14-2016 06:59 PM



I still prefer MDO over MDF because MDO is lighter, stronger, the edges can be filled or covered much easier, and other than a tack rag the surface of MDO needs virtually no additional treatment, just apply paint.
MDO also doesn t create as much airborne dust as does MDF.
Of course MDO costs more than MDF.

- oldnovice

I don’t think there is any question as to which one is better. I think it comes down to cost and whether or not any edges will need to be finished. I would doubt there is a significant weight difference per individual cabinet door.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 677 days


#12 posted 11-14-2016 08:10 PM



I still prefer MDO over MDF because MDO is lighter, stronger, the edges can be filled or covered much easier, and other than a tack rag the surface of MDO needs virtually no additional treatment, just apply paint.
MDO also doesn t create as much airborne dust as does MDF.
Of course MDO costs more than MDF.

- oldnovice

None of the local yards seem to carry MDO, or even the light weight version of MDF. I would prefer either. For interior use, I simply rub on pore filler (meant for wood floors). I apply it lit shoe polish. It sands easily and then I coat only the machined edges with shellac or BIN Zinnser. Then paint. The surface of MDF paints better than almost any other. Just the right amount of absorption for good adhesion and it does not devour much paint.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6420 posts in 3201 days


#13 posted 11-15-2016 05:33 AM

Well, that sort of determines your options!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View bdresch's profile

bdresch

133 posts in 1442 days


#14 posted 11-24-2016 08:07 PM

How about tinted poly or tinted lacquer? I bought a HVLP sprayer so I’m kinda set on something sprayable. Does anyone have any experience good or bad with either of those?

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1009 posts in 2118 days


#15 posted 11-24-2016 08:46 PM



How about tinted poly or tinted lacquer? I bought a HVLP sprayer so I m kinda set on something sprayable. Does anyone have any experience good or bad with either of those?

- bdresch

You can spray the acrylic alkyd. You just thin it with water. That’s what I did.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com