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Forum topic by tnfishdaddy posted 11-13-2016 06:11 PM 560 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 393 days


11-13-2016 06:11 PM

I recently picked up a few hand tools from my father. Planes, saws, old drills, etc. I am wanting to clean them up and use a few if them. I want to start with the planes. I was just wondering how everyone cleans theirs up so nicely? Wire brush, solvent? I don’t want to screw them up. Also, best way to sharpen them? I can barely sharpen a knife. Any help would be appreciated.


12 replies so far

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

915 posts in 2785 days


#1 posted 11-13-2016 07:05 PM

tnfishdaddy -

You are looking at undertaking two separate tasks: restoring a plane and sharpening.

Restoring planes are pretty straight forward. You have three planes all from different eras and they have their own unique challenges while restoring. There are several guys here more knowledgeable than I who could provide “how to” help for you. A blog forum like this is simply too small to cover all three of your planes. My suggestion is to read a book or search the internet (youtube is very helpful) on plane restoration to get the most bang for your buck.

Sharpening plane blades are very different from knife blades. And they require a method/system to get them done correctly. There are several out there – water stones, oil stones, sandpaper, and dedicated machines such as Tormek or Work Sharp 3000. There is a lot to consider when determining which to use – money, time, level of end result, etc, etc. Lots will want to tell you to do what they do, but I won’t because I don’t have enough info and quite frankly, what method you use is a personal choice. What I suggest is the same as with plane restoration. Read a book (or two) and look at the internet. There are many, many videos and “how to” pages out there. You should have no issues learning how to sharpen and what method you want to go with. Know this: if the plane’s blade cannot shave hair, it is not sharp enough. A dull plane blade renders it useless.

Good luck!

-- Mike

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Marn64

295 posts in 619 days


#2 posted 11-13-2016 07:13 PM

Hey there tnfishdaddy,
When restoring planes, remember to take the value of your tools into account. When I restore my antique hand planes I make sure that the plane I am restoring isn’t super valuable before I do anything drastic. Good luck and welcome to the world of hand tools, these planes might be your first restoration, but they certainly won’t be your last!
Have fun,
Benjamin

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 393 days


#3 posted 11-13-2016 07:57 PM

I just assumed that none of these were that valuable. Guess I have to figure out what I have first.

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

295 posts in 619 days


#4 posted 11-13-2016 08:01 PM



I just assumed that none of these were that valuable. Guess I have to figure out what I have first.

- tnfishdaddy


It’s a good habit to get into. I don’t see anything particularly valuable in the pictures (again, this is just my assessment based on a picture) but its better to be safe than sorry.

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

18605 posts in 2517 days


#5 posted 11-13-2016 08:06 PM

First on the left…Liberty Bell No. 122….
Second one is a Coffin Smoother….depends on what name is stamped on the iron AND on the nose of the body
Third…I can’t tell whether it is a #4 or a #5….stanley type 20
Block plane? Unsure, without see the rest of it….might be the diamond in the rough of the bunch.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Don W's profile

Don W

18520 posts in 2401 days


#6 posted 11-13-2016 09:32 PM

What Bandit said! none are to valuable to restore and use.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 393 days


#7 posted 11-13-2016 09:41 PM

I took a couple of more shots.

View tnfishdaddy's profile

tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 393 days


#8 posted 11-13-2016 09:44 PM

View Don W's profile

Don W

18520 posts in 2401 days


#9 posted 11-13-2016 11:04 PM

http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/26/bench-plane-restoration-guide-part-1/

Try some of this.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

295 posts in 619 days


#10 posted 11-13-2016 11:26 PM

Well said Don, however, what about a No 39 13/16th dado plane? Or perhaps a No 44 millers patent? Or a 340 furring plane? just teasing!

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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tnfishdaddy

16 posts in 393 days


#11 posted 11-13-2016 11:54 PM


http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/01/26/bench-plane-restoration-guide-part-1/

Try some of this.

- Don W

Thank you Don. Great site. I will be spending quite a bit of time over there as well as here. Guess the first thing I need to do is slow down and take my time. I will start another thread and share what all I am trying to do. I just started with the planes because they fascinate me the most.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4505 posts in 972 days


#12 posted 11-14-2016 04:59 PM

I just started a blog series where I’m documenting the process on a jointer plane I’m working on now. Feel free to follow along, it may prove to be useful. Hopefully I have something to offer that will help you out!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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