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Forum topic by mahdee posted 11-11-2016 04:28 PM 756 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


11-11-2016 04:28 PM

After giving up on Powermatic saw due to availability I decided on G1023RL – 10” 3 HP 240V Cabinet. I need to run a wire for this. What is the best I can do?
Thank you.

-- earthartandfoods.com


30 replies so far

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

987 posts in 2901 days


#1 posted 11-11-2016 04:33 PM

The manual recommends a 15 amp circuit, which would require a 14 gauge 14/2 wire. That seems like it is cutting it close for a motor that is rated for 14 amps. I would pull a 12 gauge 12/2 wire for this, and you can try a 15 amp breaker on it if you want, and easily swap it for a 20amp if you trip it. I would just put a 20 amp breaker on it. If you pull a 14 gauge wire, you can’t put a 20 amp breaker on it.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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HorizontalMike

7656 posts in 2750 days


#2 posted 11-11-2016 04:52 PM

I ran 12/3 in my metal garage/shop. When I added additional wiring I added armored 10/3 since it would have been to hard to squeeze into existing 1/2” conduit PLUS I put 10/3 feed to all of my 240v outlets.

IMO, if hard-wiring a new box from the panel, use 10/3. And THEN the cord from the saw should be 14/3. This allows for the saw’s cord to melt/fail without burning down the hard-wired outlets/shop. That is actually why you will see saws and other equipment come with 14-gauge cords as a precaution.

Why 14/3 and not 14/2? You want your saw to be hard-wired grounded, and not have the saw use YOU as the grounding path… ;-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


#3 posted 11-11-2016 04:53 PM

Thanks Paul. Good advice.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


#4 posted 11-11-2016 04:57 PM

Thank you Mike. You are talking a little over my head so, I am going to do some reading on your advice to wrap my head around it. I do have some heavy wire for my welder is that what you are talking about? Its about 1/2 round.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 738 days


#5 posted 11-11-2016 05:13 PM

how far is your run?

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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


#6 posted 11-11-2016 05:18 PM

About 16’.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7656 posts in 2750 days


#7 posted 11-11-2016 05:31 PM


Thank you Mike. You are talking a little over my head so, I am going to do some reading on your advice to wrap my head around it. I do have some heavy wire for my welder is that what you are talking about? Its about 1/2 round.

- mahdee

No, that’s not it. That sounds like size 2 ought (00) or larger.

Go to your local big box store and have an associate show the difference between electrical wiring sizes. Best to see it in person.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


#8 posted 11-11-2016 06:08 PM

Thank you Mike… That clears it up for me. I have the 12AWG already running into a small 220 heater in my welding shop. I was going to junction on second floor into this one for the saw. I am sure I can’t run both at the same time. 0 is the one going to the welder.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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DirtyMike

637 posts in 738 days


#9 posted 11-11-2016 06:11 PM

You should be fine with 12, But when i ran my 240 outlets, just like mike I went with 10-3 all around. There is a pretty decent price difference between 12 and 10. but running 10 lets me sleep easy at night when my small children are out in the shop running the saws.

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mahdee

3828 posts in 1603 days


#10 posted 11-11-2016 06:14 PM

Great.. Thanks a bunch. I already have these wires leftover and since I the incident with my shop, I turn off the breaker in the shop when I am not there..

-- earthartandfoods.com

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

910 posts in 1397 days


#11 posted 11-11-2016 10:04 PM



I ran 12/3 in my metal garage/shop. When I added additional wiring I added armored 10/3 since it would have been to hard to squeeze into existing 1/2” conduit PLUS I put 10/3 feed to all of my 240v outlets.

IMO, if hard-wiring a new box from the panel, use 10/3. And THEN the cord from the saw should be 14/3. This allows for the saw s cord to melt/fail without burning down the hard-wired outlets/shop. That is actually why you will see saws and other equipment come with 14-gauge cords as a precaution.

Why 14/3 and not 14/2? You want your saw to be hard-wired grounded, and not have the saw use YOU as the grounding path… ;-)

- HorizontalMike


I assume you are talking about building wire and not cordage. Building wire such as Romex and Armored cable labeled as XX-2 is two conductors plus a ground and XX-3 is three conductors plus a ground. XX-2 is all you need to use for most common circuits. Cordage is labeled differently with the ground being counted, so two conductor plus ground cord is XX-3. In most cases general purpose outlet circuits are not to be over 20A, so using #10 wire is a waste unless distance and voltage drop is an issue. Are you serious about why cords are smaller on equipment than the circuit wire? With all due respect you should not be giving electrical advice.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

686 posts in 652 days


#12 posted 11-12-2016 01:19 AM

Breakers are sized to open up before the wire gets hot enough to melt the insulation regardless of what caused the overcurrent condition. Power tool cords are sized to carry the nominal current for the motor. Over sized cable will not improve safety but may provide the versatility to replace the breaker with a larger one if needed. My shop has one 30A 240VAC socket and 4 20A 240VAC sockets. The first run uses 10/2 with ground and the others use 12/2 with Ground.


I ran 12/3 in my metal garage/shop. When I added additional wiring I added armored 10/3 since it would have been to hard to squeeze into existing 1/2” conduit PLUS I put 10/3 feed to all of my 240v outlets.

IMO, if hard-wiring a new box from the panel, use 10/3. And THEN the cord from the saw should be 14/3. This allows for the saw s cord to melt/fail without burning down the hard-wired outlets/shop. That is actually why you will see saws and other equipment come with 14-gauge cords as a precaution.

Why 14/3 and not 14/2? You want your saw to be hard-wired grounded, and not have the saw use YOU as the grounding path… ;-)

- HorizontalMike


View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2780 days


#13 posted 11-12-2016 01:25 AM

I had to open this up on my other computer, because I needed 14 gauge to be bigger (bigger monitor and more effective when I hold down Ctrl and spin the mouse wheel), so I could quit running ten for my big toys.

Thank you Mike. You are talking a little over my head so, I am going to do some reading on your advice to wrap my head around it. I do have some heavy wire for my welder is that what you are talking about? Its about 1/2 round.

- mahdee

No, that s not it. That sounds like size 2 ought (00) or larger.

Go to your local big box store and have an associate show the difference between electrical wiring sizes. Best to see it in person.

- HorizontalMike


View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2562 posts in 1861 days


#14 posted 11-12-2016 01:30 AM

As ArtMann points out, that should really be 14-2 or 12-2, with both having a bare (usually), or green ground wire. The only time to use 14-3 or 12-3, etc. is when the appliance will also have components running 120v. besides the 240 elements. Stoves and clothes dryers are examples. Don’t know why that is, as 240 will run small motors like fans just as easily as 120. That’s all they do in Europe and Australia, for example.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2780 days


#15 posted 11-12-2016 01:31 AM

Except for five specialty outlets running ten gauge, every outlet in my shop is twelve gauge. If you run fourteen, you limit what you can run on it, and how far you can run it. In short, plan for the future [you don’t know about] as best you can.

Regardless what wire you run for your 120VAC circuits, buy good outlets. Not the poke-in garbage, unless it’s the type you push the wire into, then clamp it down with a screw. They’re much easier to use than the type you have to hook, but even those aren’t really much hassle when you consider you aren’t playing with them but once.

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