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Imitation arch top raised panels -- best way?

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Forum topic by MyFathersSon posted 07-17-2010 07:37 PM 1176 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2780 days


07-17-2010 07:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

They have:
a 60’s vintage kitchen with typical plain/flat front semi-overlay cabinet doors.
3/4” thick doors—3/8” x 3/8” overlay.

They want:
They want the LOOK of archtop raised panels but don’t want to go the cost of new doors.

My thoughts:
The two ways I know to mimic that look is by either
Routing into the existing doors.
Trace the pattern of the panel with a couple of V or rounded grooves about an inch apart and then a mortise bit to flatten out the space between.
Overlay
Cut ‘rails’, ‘stiles’ and ‘panel’ out of 3/8” plywood or MDF – route the edges appropriately and glue/brad them onto the surface of the doors. – inset about 1/4” from the outer edge of the door to give decorative edge.

Questions
Is there a third option I’m overlooking?
Of these two – which would be preferred?
If I went with the overlay—should I get by with 1/4” instead of 3/8”?
or – conversely – should I go up to 1/2”
(Yes – I know that is largely subjective—but I value input.)
THANKS

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.


5 replies so far

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Gene Howe

8263 posts in 2896 days


#1 posted 07-17-2010 11:15 PM

Overlay of no more than 3/8. A 1/4” inset would require the arch to be inset also, wouldn’t it? Would that look OK if it were inset all around?
How about a profile all around the outer edge and match it on the inner edges?

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2780 days


#2 posted 07-17-2010 11:29 PM

The profile on the outer edges of the doors will be for lack or a better word a double roundover.
The outer edges of the doors already have a 1/8” roundover so I’m stuck with that.
Thought I would round the outer edges of the rail and stiles in the same way.

I’m torn regarding the edges of the ‘panel’ and the inner edges of the “rails and stiles”.
Thought about roundover to match the outer edge—
But I also thought about a concave edge to get a smoother transition.
I’ve noticed on many commercial cabinets the inner edging and outer edging does not match.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

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Gene Howe

8263 posts in 2896 days


#3 posted 07-18-2010 03:47 AM

Hey. I like the cove on the outside edge transitioning to the round over. Good idea!
It’s true that many don’t match. I was trying to keep the look simple as you are adding a good deal of extra shadow lines and design elements with the added stiles, rails and arches. How would a cove on the inside look? Maybe make sticks a little fat and cove both edges. Of course, you are limited to the width of the current sticks, right? Not sure how to handle the arch either. You’d have to cut one and rout it to see if looks right. I’m terrible at visualization. I gotta see it in the wood.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2780 days


#4 posted 07-18-2010 05:45 AM

Actually – that was my first thought.
But I decided it would be easier to get sharp corners by doing the outside in 4 pieces and mitering the corners—as opposed to having to go back and chisel the corners.

Having now done one that way—I am rethinking that.
Just finished one as a sample for the customer—if they decide they do want to go this way—that means 16 more—-I have a feeling the rest are probably going to be done—‘your’ way.

This is my first time at ‘overlaying’ anyting other than simple molding.
The last time I had a project where I had to do ‘fake’ panels – I did it by routing into the existing door.

No one has commented on that option—so I conclude the overlay method is preferred these days.

THANKS

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

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MyFathersSon

180 posts in 2780 days


#5 posted 07-18-2010 05:48 AM

Gene -
I went with cove for all of the profiles on the overlays—it does give a less—busy—look.
Wish there was a way to just attach a photo here.
I’m the same as you about needing to eyeball something.
Soon as I get it primed and painted I’ll post in the projects area.

-- Those who insist it can't be done - should politely refrain from interrupting those who are doing it.

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