LumberJocks

I'm terrible at sharpening, service or sell?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by CharlesA posted 11-07-2016 04:45 PM 853 views 1 time favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3294 posts in 1638 days


11-07-2016 04:45 PM

I bought this at WIA, and I’ve confirmed what I already knew—I suck at sharpening. The sharpening service I use in Louisville doesn’t do hand saws. Should I send it to someone or sell it? I paid $50 for it.

Charles

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


18 replies so far

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3294 posts in 1638 days


#1 posted 11-07-2016 05:05 PM

Sharpening Shack has a pretty quick turnaround, but doesn’t seem as specialized as some of the other handsaw sharpening services I’ve seen. I’d love recomendaitons:

http://www.sharpeningshack.net/hand_saw_sharpening.html

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View JayT's profile

JayT

5455 posts in 2051 days


#2 posted 11-07-2016 05:10 PM

You aren’t going to want to hear this, but maybe have someone help you learn to sharpen. If you are going to use traditional hand saws, it’s a necessity. You can certainly send saws out, but unless you ship quite a few at a time, the shipping is going to cost a lot more than the sharpening.

Have you watched Brit's video? It’s long and has a lot of info, but take one step at a time and it’s helpful. Otherwise, Bob (summerfi) or chrisstef may be able to help. When I was starting with saws, stef sent me a message with some good advice that really helped me get off on the right foot. If you want, I can see if I still have that email and PM the content to you.

I also found it much easier to start with a coarser toothed rip saw and worked my way up to crosscuts and finer teeth. The one you’ve got pictured would be a huge challenge to do without having some practice first. I know that some people use the Veritas saw file holder and find it useful.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2600 posts in 2837 days


#3 posted 11-07-2016 05:25 PM

Im with jayT.
Learn to sharpen tools.
Its part of using them.
Take your time, if you dont do it right do it again, and again, and again. till you master it ,

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3294 posts in 1638 days


#4 posted 11-07-2016 05:30 PM

I’ve learned to sharpen chisels and plane blades, send out my TS blades, don’t sharpen router or drill bits or bandsaw blades. Handsaw sharpening just seems much more complicated and time-consuming. Am I wrong about that?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8336 posts in 1326 days


#5 posted 11-07-2016 05:35 PM

Sharpening a saw is like sharpening an iron. You need a setup that works for you and you need to learn the mechanics. Filing rip saws isn’t that hard after a shot or 2.

There are a few people on here alone that you could send it to. As well as some others not on this site.

I’d ask around here. Whether for info on filing or someone to do it for you.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/27984

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5455 posts in 2051 days


#6 posted 11-07-2016 05:49 PM

Handsaw sharpening just seems much more complicated and time-consuming. Am I wrong about that?

- CharlesA

It’s a little bit more time consuming, but not as much as most people would think. I can touch up a dull rip saw pretty quickly, while a crosscut takes a bit more time. If it requires reshaping or resetting the teeth, it’ll take longer, too. Just like planes and chisels, once you have it sharpened well, it doesn’t take a lot of time to touch it up.

Either way, it’s far faster than sending them out. In the time it would take to package a saw, drive to the post office and back home, I could resharpen a couple saws.

One thing I found with saws is that even if the sharpening is not perfect, it’ll still cut better than before. Not necessarily true with chisels and planes. Each time I do a saw, it’s better than the previous, but all the saws I’ve done have worked.

Now, for a restoration that needs re-toothed and sharpened, I would send it to Bob, if he’s taking on work. Having someone with a toothing machine punch those out instead of filing every one is totally worth it. After that, maintaining the saw is not that hard.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3294 posts in 1638 days


#7 posted 11-07-2016 06:01 PM


When I was starting with saws, stef sent me a message with some good advice that really helped me get off on the right foot. If you want, I can see if I still have that email and PM the content to you.

- JayT

That’s kind of you. I would appreciate it. Thanks.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1794 posts in 487 days


#8 posted 11-07-2016 06:10 PM

Charles – I agree with JayT … learn to sharpen … perhaps build a sharpening jig to use until you get comfortable! Once you do that backsaw will become your most treasured tool. Great lookin’ saw by the way!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1179 posts in 1638 days


#9 posted 11-07-2016 07:37 PM

I say send them it to a get a proper sharpening.Then if you use it enough to dull the cut then try your self.
You will have a good reference how that saw should cut.

I sharpen my dovetail saws but finding good files sucks.
My crosscut saws I send to Mike Wenzloff.
I can only dream about filing a saw as good.

Aj

-- Aj

View Handtooler's profile

Handtooler

1489 posts in 1972 days


#10 posted 11-07-2016 08:15 PM

Watch the videos of Paul Sellers on the subject then give it a go. I’v filed my saw, which my father abused terribly, as a progressive rip twice and each time the results gets better. I’m looking forward to a really excellent sharpening.
The progressive rip works nicely for both crosscut and rip, not finish smooth for crosscut but fine for my use.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@outlook.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1794 posts in 487 days


#11 posted 11-07-2016 08:23 PM

Russell – Great suggestion! I watched Paul Sellers’ video just twice before attacking a rather large rip saw. Paul makes it VERY easy … all the way down to the “poor man’s” saw vice! (but then again Pauls Sellers seems to take the mystery out of just about everything)

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3685 posts in 1801 days


#12 posted 11-07-2016 09:07 PM

I agree with JayT. Saw sharpening is more forgiving than edge tool sharpening. My saw sharpening still isn’t great, but I can make a dull saw cut much better. AJ’s solution isn’t bad to see how a well sharpened saw cuts to have a reference. But if the hour or a bit more of trying to learn sharpening and not being perfect sounds more painful to you than paying the shipping plus sharpening fees then don’t hesitate to send it out.

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17031 posts in 2846 days


#13 posted 11-07-2016 09:47 PM

Its just a repetitive motion, over and over again about 1000 times. Hinge at the elbow … its a lot like shooting pool or throwing darts. I actually find backsaws easier to do than coarse tooth rip saws because there’s less material to remove from each tooth. There’s some finicky little things to look for like the shape of the flat after jointing and the depth of your gullets but that’ll come with time.

Like mentioned above, Brit’s video is world class IMO. It taught me everything ive needed. Sit down with a note pad and take some notes. If youre filing rip just watch the section on rip saws, no need to confuse yourself with crosscut filing just yet. It took me 3 sessions of watching the video on my couch to really grasp it and another 5-6 saws with hands on to understand it even further. I can now blow through a backsaw in about an hour.

If youre at your wits end with it, send it to me and ill sharpen it for ya. Or I can reshape the teeth and get it to a state where it only needs a final sharpening that you can do. Ive got all my gear out at the moment. No charge, but when it becomes dull, its on you to freshen it up and I will follow up on it ;)

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View mike02130's profile

mike02130

167 posts in 513 days


#14 posted 11-07-2016 10:38 PM

Save it and buy a cheap one to practice on.

-- Google first, search forums second, ask questions later.

View Don W's profile

Don W

18526 posts in 2408 days


#15 posted 11-07-2016 11:24 PM

Watch Andy’s video. 2 or 3 times if needed, but I can’t see anybody who wants to learn who can’t learn with the video.

I really don’t like it, like Stef said, its over and over and over and over. I also found have a good visor and vise helps a lot.

The visor I use is listed here http://www.timetestedtools.net/2016/02/04/tools-i-use-for-saw-sharpening/

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com