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G0715 wired for 15AMP

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Forum topic by HassanMirza posted 11-07-2016 04:28 PM 723 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HassanMirza

57 posts in 675 days


11-07-2016 04:28 PM

Hello,

I have an opportunity to purchase a Grizzly G0715P table saw which many of you know can be wired for 110V. Grizzly claims that it draws 16AMPS, I wanted to know if someone has it wired for 15AMP usage? And if it will be a problem if I did that? I don’t have room on the panel for anymore breakers.

Thanks in Advance,

Hassan

-- Hassan Mirza


17 replies so far

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1684 posts in 2693 days


#1 posted 11-07-2016 04:36 PM

Replace the existing outlet circuit with receptacle and wire rated for 20 amps. Replace existing 15 amp breaker using 20 amp breaker. That way your electrical will be safe if you have followed all the rules and done a good job.

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Loren's profile

Loren

9606 posts in 3482 days


#2 posted 11-07-2016 04:38 PM

You should be fine. Replace your 15 amp breaker
with a 20 amp breaker if you like. The wiring should
be okay… you can check the wire gauges if you
like.

Sometimes with extremely old wiring you can
expect starting problems with some motors pushing
the edge. I’ve run 19 amp motors off 20 amp
breakers at 110v.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2710 posts in 1314 days


#3 posted 11-07-2016 04:49 PM

You can always plug it in a give it a try. Needs to be on dedicated circuit. If popping breaker (and I suspect it will) then go to a 20A breaker/#12 wire.

But, if possible to use split breakers to open slots, I would go with a 20A double pole breaker and switch the motor to 220V. Don’t ask me why OK? :-)

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View HassanMirza's profile

HassanMirza

57 posts in 675 days


#4 posted 11-07-2016 04:54 PM

First of all thanks to all for answering….....Its already prewired 220 and I guess its worth a shot to buy a Ten dollar part and try it at 110, and if all fails I will just have to switch a line to 220 it can always be switched back . I was not sure if someone had done that before, I saw someone on here by the name of ZiggyZ posted that they used a standard 15Amp set up and it worked out fine. But I wanted to know about the long term usage.

-- Hassan Mirza

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

909 posts in 1395 days


#5 posted 11-08-2016 01:36 AM

To change the breaker to 20A without sizing the wire for 20A is just terrible advice.

View TarHeelz's profile

TarHeelz

58 posts in 1915 days


#6 posted 11-08-2016 01:57 AM

If you’ve already got 12 gauge wire in the wall, why bother buying a 20A 110 breaker and receptacle when your saw is just as happy (happier?) with a 220 receptacle?

-- Tar Heelz, Durham, NC USA

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

956 posts in 425 days


#7 posted 11-08-2016 04:58 AM



You should be fine. Replace your 15 amp breaker
with a 20 amp breaker if you like. The wiring should
be okay…

- Loren


This post must be higlighted and pinned as a warning not to let wannabe electricians anywhere near wires.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2889 posts in 1822 days


#8 posted 11-08-2016 11:49 AM

Carlos is absolutely correct.

If you are not familiar with what you are doing, get an electrician.

You need to check the wiring size and use the right size. If it is not large enough, you need to fix it properly.

NEVER change a breaker without checking the wire…

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

956 posts in 425 days


#9 posted 11-08-2016 02:50 PM

OP I had G0715P on one 15a corcuit and HF 2hp dust collector on another. The dust collector would pop up the breaker 5 times out of 10 starts due to the heavy impeller. The saw did pop up the breaker once in a while but most of the time was ok. If you plan to use a heavy dado set it will pop up more often but again not too bad.
Still I would not recommend it. Check if you can double some reakers in the panel and run 20A or 220v or even a subpanel

View HassanMirza's profile

HassanMirza

57 posts in 675 days


#10 posted 11-08-2016 03:05 PM

Thank you all for the advice I am having an electrician coming out to the house to look at it. I don’t want to patch something together just to run the saw and cause a house fire. I am planning on either going to 20 AMP breaker and receptacle. Or if that is not an option (panel is pretty full) I will go to a subpanel. I am currently running a DeWalt 745 (small jobsite saw) and a big shop vac on it same receptacle that I want to use for the G0715P, its all hooked up with one of those plug in that starts the vac when you start the saw. I have ran it with my Dewalt planer and shop vac and also my 6 inch jointer and vac. I have not had issues.

-- Hassan Mirza

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2901 days


#11 posted 11-08-2016 03:54 PM

NEVER just replace the breaker/recepticle/plug from 15 to 20 amps. Most likely if its got 15A breaker/outlets, they used 14awg wiring. You could burn your house down. You need to match plug/wire/brearker/outlet to match.

If you want 20A you need 12awg wire and appropriately rated plugs. Good choice to have an electrician do it if you are not comfortable doing it yourself.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

678 posts in 650 days


#12 posted 11-08-2016 05:37 PM

If you can ascertain that the wiring is 12 AWG, which is typical with well built houses, then all you have to do to convert to a 20A circuit is swap the 15A breaker for a 20A one and replace the receptacle with a 20A outlet. This second step is usually not necessary but I would do it anyway. The configuration of the 20A receptacle looks a little different but will accommodate both 15 and 20 amp plugs.

I can say with no reservations that a 120VAC (110 is not nominal!) 20A circuit will power the saw without difficulty. I know because that is the way my G0715 is configured. I would have left it at 240VAC (220 isn’t nominal either!) but I bought the saw used and the previous owner converted it to 240VAC. I plan to change it back when I get the time for line balancing purposes.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2901 days


#13 posted 11-08-2016 06:18 PM



If you can ascertain that the wiring is 12 AWG, which is typical with well built houses, then all you have to do to convert to a 20A circuit is swap the 15A breaker for a 20A one and replace the receptacle with a 20A outlet. This second step is usually not necessary but I would do it anyway. The configuration of the 20A receptacle looks a little different but will accommodate both 15 and 20 amp plugs.

I can say with no reservations that a 120VAC (110 is not nominal!) 20A circuit will power the saw without difficulty. I know because that is the way my G0715 is configured. I would have left it at 240VAC (220 isn t nominal either!) but I bought the saw used and the previous owner converted it to 240VAC. I plan to change it back when I get the time for line balancing purposes.

- ArtMann

I don’t know a ton of builders that put 12 awg in for a 15a circuit? But is nice if they do.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4693 posts in 1554 days


#14 posted 11-09-2016 01:19 AM



NEVER just replace the breaker/recepticle/plug from 15 to 20 amps. Most likely if its got 15A breaker/outlets, they used 14awg wiring. You could burn your house down. You need to match plug/wire/brearker/outlet to match.

If you want 20A you need 12awg wire and appropriately rated plugs. Good choice to have an electrician do it if you are not comfortable doing it yourself.

- bonesbr549


The receptacle, once mentioned before but it too should be changed to match the breaker. Another thing not yet mentioned is if you do burn your house down as a result of electrical work done by someone unqualified to do so, you will likely have voided your homeowner’s insurance.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

956 posts in 425 days


#15 posted 11-09-2016 12:58 PM


Another thing not yet mentioned is if you do burn your house down as a result of electrical work done by someone unqualified to do so, you will likely have voided your homeowner s insurance.
- bigblockyeti

Not necessarily, the insurance could be voided even if the incorrect wiring is not to blame. In case of an insurance claim the company will send a guy whose the only task is to find a reason not to pay or to pay as little as possible.

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