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glue lines

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Forum topic by Ryan posted 07-15-2010 11:12 PM 806 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ryan

211 posts in 1653 days


07-15-2010 11:12 PM

Dear folks
I think some already knows what I’m going to talk about.
I often make tables by joing same type of wood like cherry, maple or walnut,
most of time use kiln-dried ones. Sometimes the table shows the glue lines 2-3
weeks after joining the wood. It doesn’t show up all the time but sometimes
it hurts my schedule. The worst timing is one week after finishing the
project, so have to refinsh the surface. I use Titebond II most of time.
Any idea why the glues lines show up?
And do you know how to prevent it?
Thank you.
- Ryan


2 replies so far

View pvwoodcrafts's profile

pvwoodcrafts

226 posts in 2645 days


#1 posted 07-15-2010 11:23 PM

Its glue creep. A nasty little problem. I also use titebond II. Far as I know nothin’ you can do to stop it. On my cutting boards and rolling pins I glue up at least a month in advance.Stopped it on those projects but on furniture its not hardly possible to leave all your work sit around for a month. Some claim the poly glue won’t creep.Sorry not much help.

-- mike & judy western md. www. pvwoodcrafts.com pvwccf1@verizon.net

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2542 posts in 2466 days


#2 posted 07-16-2010 12:03 AM

What I have found is that it doesn’t need a month for most tabletops (4/4 edge joints), but the PVA glue contains water, so your glue line will swell with the added moisture. If you clamp overnight, and come back and plane the surface smooth while the moisture is still high, you will find that once the moisture content or the wood along the joint returns to normal (equilibrium Moisture Content) it will have shrink so you have a glue line that is ‘below’ the surface of the table.
True that Poly and epoxies will not do that but that is not always a choice, and it is expensive. Like pv mentions, you need to let not just the glue cure, but the wood to dry out again. For me it is a week and I don’t see problems, but Kansas is dry, and I do most of my work on weekends so the timing doesn’t mess me up too much.
good luck

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

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