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Painting a wood for a simple utility shelf

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Forum topic by PHXRob posted 11-06-2016 11:18 PM 874 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PHXRob

33 posts in 405 days


11-06-2016 11:18 PM

Hello All -

I just made a simple wooden shelf with recycled wood (used to be a table, I found it in the trash. I’ll post pictures when I’m done). Right now, I just want to put a coat of paint on it. Its going to be used as a wall shelf to hold a DVD player in my guest room. I’m using an alkyd semi-gloss white enamel, but its hard to work with. Any suggestions? I don’t have a sprayer, and brush/roller is what I’m restricted to.

-- "Clear alcohols are for rich women on diets" - Ron Swanson


21 replies so far

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1696 days


#1 posted 11-06-2016 11:26 PM

How about milk paint?

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

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PHXRob

33 posts in 405 days


#2 posted 11-06-2016 11:38 PM



How about milk paint?

- UncannyValleyWoods

Just googled it. Kinda cool. No idea it existed.

-- "Clear alcohols are for rich women on diets" - Ron Swanson

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Madmark2

370 posts in 421 days


#3 posted 11-07-2016 12:08 AM

Foam brush.

M

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JBrow

1269 posts in 753 days


#4 posted 11-07-2016 03:08 AM

PHXRob,

My approach would start by sanding the shelf parallel to the grain or with a random orbital sander until smooth, to at least 150 grit. Depending on how rough the wood is would dictate the initial sanding grit. If the wood is reasonably smooth, I would probably start with 100 grit or even 120 grit. Otherwise I would start at 80 grit. Running through the grits without skipping grits; 80grit, 100 grit, 120 grit, then 150 grit should leave a smooth surface with no deep scratches. After sanding, the surface would be vacuumed and rubbed down with a tack cloth until the tack cloth no longer pulls dust from the surface.

The first coat of paint would be a primer coat. If the primer is a water based primer compatible with an alkyd paint top coat, I would first raise the grain of the wood by wiping the wood with a heavily water dampened cloth. After the water has dried, the resulting rough surface would be sanded a second time at 150 grit until smooth. The surface is vacuumed and tacked free of dust. Then the water based primer would be applied. If an oil-based primer is used, then raising the grain and subsequent sanding is probably unnecessary.

After the primer has dried, the top coat would be applied. After the paint is applied to the surface, a single brush stroke over the full length of the shelf while the paint is still wet, pulling the brush parallel to grain of the wood, would leave a uniform appearance. I find that one coat of the top coat is generally insufficient for a good look. A second application is often enough, but there have been times when a third or even fourth coat is needed. Sanding between top coats could leave a nicer final finished surface, but since I have never done this I cannot say for sure.

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BurlyBob

5043 posts in 2098 days


#5 posted 11-07-2016 04:18 AM

Totally agree with Jbrow. Follow his instructions and you can’t go wrong, period.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2129 days


#6 posted 11-07-2016 01:31 PM

I would guess it’s hard to work with also because it needs to be thinned. Got paint thinner?

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HorizontalMike

7649 posts in 2746 days


#7 posted 11-07-2016 02:05 PM



How about milk paint?
- UncannyValleyWoods

Also recommend that you MAKE IT yourself. Easy to do with fat-Free of Skim-Milk and vinegar. After curdling and draining, add Lime(garden variety) to make the paint.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/53291

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Cooler

299 posts in 676 days


#8 posted 11-07-2016 02:55 PM

I have not used real milk paint; I have used GF “milk paint” which is an acrylic version that looks like milk paint.

I have also used flat finish latex paint. All the flat finishes I have used will show scuff marks readily. I’m not sure if real milk paint will too, but it is a flat finish.

Milk paint, from what I’ve read has excellent adhesion with raw wood, but requires a bonding agent if applied over other finishes.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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PHXRob

33 posts in 405 days


#9 posted 11-07-2016 03:21 PM



I would guess it s hard to work with also because it needs to be thinned. Got paint thinner?

- dhazelton

No, and I wouldn’t know where to start. Care to get me pointed in the right direction on mix ratio, etc?

-- "Clear alcohols are for rich women on diets" - Ron Swanson

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HorizontalMike

7649 posts in 2746 days


#10 posted 11-07-2016 03:33 PM

From my experience, one of the batches of my DIY milk paint was mixed with too much water(didn’t drain the kurds enough). I found it to NOT cover evenly and it required several more coats in order to approximate what you should be able to get from a single coat. Read too much work.

If you are wanting to end up with some of the wood grain showing through the paint then use less coloring agent and do NOT use any Titanium White in the mix. The Titanium White lightens the color, plus it lends more opacity to the paint. If you choose to use less coloring agent, the milk kurds will show more prominently in the finished product (a good thing if you are going for an accurate rustic appearance). BTW, milk paint is not a “spray” paint. The milk kurds would quickly clog your paint gun.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

14829 posts in 2451 days


#11 posted 11-07-2016 06:54 PM


I would guess it s hard to work with also because it needs to be thinned. Got paint thinner?

- dhazelton

No, and I wouldn t know where to start. Care to get me pointed in the right direction on mix ratio, etc?

- PHXRob

Gotta know if it’s Alkalyd or Latex white enamel paint you’re dealing with. If it’s alkalyd (oil-based) paint, your thinner is Mineral Spirits. If it’s latex, thinner is Water. Mix ratio is very scientific: add small amounts (small splashes at a time into the can of paint to be thinned) and mix will (stir) after each splash to get the viscosity you’re looking for. Needs to be spreadable, obviously.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Cooler

299 posts in 676 days


#12 posted 11-07-2016 07:50 PM

My experience is that oil based paints (mostly Rustoleum) is more abrasion resistant than other paints other than poly.

But with either poly or oil based paints you need to let it cure fully (about 200 hours or 7 days) before you put anything on them or they will either adhere to the paint or make divots in the finish.

Personally I would put down a flat latex and top with clear poly. I have good experience with that combination and it does not require lots of fresh air like Rustoleum does.

But do yourself a favor and allow adequate cure times.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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dhazelton

2607 posts in 2129 days


#13 posted 11-07-2016 09:46 PM

Alkyd is oil based and it usually needs to be thinned to make it flow out better. Assuming that you started with smooth wood (a prefinished table) that was stained and varnished somehow, sand your piece with fine paper like 220 and give it a coat of oil or shellac based primer like BIN or any Zinnser product, sand again to smooth that and apply two coats of your finish (sand AGAIN between, maybe 400 grit), probably thinned about 10-15% to make it flow out better (it won’t leave brush strokes as readily and won’t pile up in the corners). It will come out silky smooth.

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Cooler

299 posts in 676 days


#14 posted 11-07-2016 09:54 PM


Alkyd is oil based and it usually needs to be thinned to make it flow out better. Assuming that you started with smooth wood (a prefinished table) that was stained and varnished somehow, sand your piece with fine paper like 220 and give it a coat of oil or shellac based primer like BIN or any Zinnser product, sand again to smooth that and apply two coats of your finish (sand AGAIN between, maybe 400 grit), probably thinned about 10-15% to make it flow out better (it won t leave brush strokes as readily and won t pile up in the corners). It will come out silky smooth.

- dhazelton

When I Google “garage utility shelving” all the home built versions were left unfinished:

https://www.google.com/search?q=garage+shelving&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=662&site=webhp&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwip3eyP0JfQAhUM1CYKHffoDoEQ_AUIBygC#tbm=isch&q=garage+utility+shelving

Basement is the same but a higher percentage appear to be home built:

https://www.google.com/search?q=garage+shelving&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=662&site=webhp&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwip3eyP0JfQAhUM1CYKHffoDoEQ_AUIBygC#tbm=isch&q=garage+utility+shelving

For me, utility shelves are done sturdy but quick and cheap. The existing finish would work fine for me.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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MrUnix

5973 posts in 2031 days


#15 posted 11-07-2016 10:13 PM

Alkyd is oil based and it usually needs to be thinned to make it flow out better.
- dhazelton

I agree that an oil based enamel should be thinned to get it to flow better, but are all Alkyd enamels oil based? For example, Behr Alkyd Semi-Gloss Enamel found at the BORG does not appear to be oil based at all, and they give you no clue as to what to thin with – only that they do not recommend thinning, and on their data sheet, say specifically to not thin in capital letters. And it cleans up with soap and water? Guess the message here is read the label!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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