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How to store a wet paintbrush up to 3 days for reuse

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Forum topic by Planeman40 posted 11-06-2016 04:16 AM 1812 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Planeman40

1035 posts in 2599 days


11-06-2016 04:16 AM

Topic tags/keywords: paint paint brush trick

Its a pain to have to clean a paintbrush after use when you are going to use it the next day for the next coat. Here is a quick cure for that. Wrap the wet paint brush tightly in aluminum foil to keep the air out. I have found a wrapped paint brush can go three days and still be wet and pliable for putting on the next coat. After three days it begins to slowly stiffen up, but it is still usable. Three days is my maximum though. Works like a charm and saves a lot of time! Try it!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!


16 replies so far

View mandatory66's profile

mandatory66

202 posts in 1968 days


#1 posted 11-06-2016 04:39 AM

I found that plastic food wrap or Saran wrap works well also.Easy to make it air tight.

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 834 days


#2 posted 11-06-2016 04:43 AM

Zip-loc bags.

-- Clin

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5594 posts in 3032 days


#3 posted 11-06-2016 04:58 AM

I wrap my wet brushes in a bread wrapper. Stick it in, put on a twist tie, and it’s ready when you are…!!

-- My grandpa used to say: "Y'all come back when you can....come after dinner, and leave before supper.."

View Ajs73's profile

Ajs73

154 posts in 1356 days


#4 posted 11-06-2016 08:52 AM

After wrapping up, stick it in the refrigerator. (if spouse allows) will last even longer

-- Andy, NE Ohio

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4758 posts in 2331 days


#5 posted 11-06-2016 11:33 AM


After wrapping up, stick it in the refrigerator. (if spouse allows) will last even longer

- Ajs73

^^^^^^ works for me. I just use a sandwich bag (keep a box of them in the shop just for this and other things) squeeze the air out, and put it in the fridge. (oil based finishes only)

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2902 posts in 1826 days


#6 posted 11-06-2016 11:46 AM

I use something called Press N Seal which is like glad wrap but slightly sticky. I have a roll in my shop and use it for paint brunches and also like a wide tape. It does not leave any stickiness on things.

This is one of the non-shop items that I keep in my shop.

View RandyinFlorida's profile

RandyinFlorida

223 posts in 1905 days


#7 posted 11-06-2016 12:46 PM

Water based finishes; latex paint specifically can be put in the freezer. I would think any water based finished would be the same.

Let thaw to room temperature. Don’t do what I did. Microwaved it. Ruined the brush.

-- Randy in Crestview Florida, Wood Rocks!

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

239 posts in 2628 days


#8 posted 11-06-2016 02:12 PM

For water based poly I just triple rinse with soap and water in the sink. The same brush can be used dozens of times with this procedure. Learned from Matthias Wandel.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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rbm328

13 posts in 719 days


#9 posted 11-06-2016 02:23 PM

my wife stores rollers and brushes in a ziplock and stores them in the refridgerator. i’ve seen her use a roller a couple months after she first sealed it up.

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runswithscissors

2564 posts in 1863 days


#10 posted 11-10-2016 02:43 AM

For oil based paints only, rest the brush vertically in a can or jar of water, enough to cover the bristles. To use, shake the water off the brush, and wipe with a shop cloth (I like the paper kind). Never seems to interfere with the drying or application qualities of the paint. Of course, eventually the ferrule will rust.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 407 days


#11 posted 11-10-2016 03:21 AM

wow, you just learned this??? Amazing, it has been going on for decades!!!!

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Planeman40

1035 posts in 2599 days


#12 posted 11-10-2016 03:43 AM

Yeah, its been going on for decades. I’m 76 years old and learned about aluminum foil and paintbrushes from reading Popular Mechanics magazine in the early 1950s when I was in my early teens. That was more than 60 years ago. But you would be surprised at the number of people who haven’t heard of it, a lot of them on this website. I no longer read any of the woodworking magazines as I have seen and read all of it many times before. There is little new in woodworking. There are new people trying to learn it though.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

4495 posts in 3081 days


#13 posted 11-10-2016 08:21 PM

I’ve heard all of these before and agree, but; can you store a brush that has been used with shellac or other quick drying coatings in the same way? How about brushes using contact cement?

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2611 posts in 2134 days


#14 posted 11-11-2016 01:01 AM

We used to wrap our paintbrushes in a couple layers of newspaper folded so they held the shape of the bristles and then placed them in a bucket of water.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4758 posts in 2331 days


#15 posted 11-11-2016 11:59 AM



I ve heard all of these before and agree, but; can you store a brush that has been used with shellac or other quick drying coatings in the same way? How about brushes using contact cement?

- MrRon


Just a tip about the shellac, Ron. Those brushes (if dedicated to shellac use) don’t have to be cleaned or anything else….just let the shellac harden on the brush. The before you use it the next time, suspend the brush bristles in a jar of DNA, or the shellac you intend to apply. They soften up after about 15 minutes and are ready to go. No solution for contact cement….I think I would use the cheap disposable chip brushes and pitch it after you’re done.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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