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Forum topic by Jack Lewis posted 11-05-2016 06:02 PM 970 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jack Lewis

208 posts in 913 days


11-05-2016 06:02 PM

It seems that some companies either ignore or take a price advantage on certain tools, accessories, etc. My lathe a Grizzly has 1 1/4” x 8 tpi spindle threads. When purchased they supply one (1) 6’ faceplate and have no plans to have or supply other sizes. The same goes for tool rests. When asked about purchasing another they claim backorder. Other big name

companies do have the units but charge an enormous price compared to competition. Is it because the tend to business and keep stock on hand? Or better management? Or to take advantage of the other companies that seem NOT to give a damn about their customers? I did find one manufacture, albeit, a small firm, that makes them and has stock any size, any thread, any special need as expressed. Sure they charge for the special stuff but that is to be expected for custom made items. I can buy 3” faceplates for $11 ea. which I think is a fair price.
I decided to manufacture a couple of 6” plates myself. Purchased two nuts for $11. and change. Had them welded to some 5lb plate 6.5 in. square for $30. so for $41 bucks I have two 6” faceplates. The weld shop said he would do them cheaper in bigger quantities but two new ones are sufficient for now. I had to drill mounting holes myself but WTH, I am doing this for the enjoyment anyway!

I don’t want to always do things on the cheap but also don’t like to be taken unfair advantage of.

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"


9 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5983 posts in 2033 days


#1 posted 11-05-2016 08:12 PM

I’m not exactly sure about what you are asking… but it seems like you are commenting on how OEM prices are extremely high compared to other sources? Certainly not a surprise, as it’s been like that for as long as I can remember. You pay a premium for having that OEM brand stuck on it… how else can you justify stuff like charging over $3 for a lock washer that can be had at the local hardware store for a few cents, or over $30 for a cheap Chinese bearing when you can get a much better quality one from places like Accurate for just a few bucks :)

They do it because they can get away with it. I’d be willing to bet that most people think that you HAVE to have a replacement part from the company who made the machine, and are completely unaware that the exact same thing can be found for a fraction of the cost from other sources minus the OEM brand slapped on it.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: I have a couple dozen faceplates for my lathe(s)... and all they cost me was a couple bucks for a thread tap!

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7721 posts in 1841 days


#2 posted 11-05-2016 08:20 PM

Good job on the face plates Jack. And at that price, it’s a great deal.

Only thing I might worry about is the sharp corners of those square steel pieces spinning near my hands. I think I’d be tempted to grind then into something just a bit more round.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5328 posts in 3497 days


#3 posted 11-05-2016 08:38 PM

I have noticed the scarcity of reasonably priced faceplates for bigger spindles.

My lathe (Nova DVR 2024) came with a 6” faceplate, and I have several 3” faceplates (Nova plates that I bought for about $16 each).

I have made a number of wooden faceplates, using a 1-1/4” x 8 tpi tap and the hardest wood I could find in the shop (usually hard maple).

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Jack Lewis's profile

Jack Lewis

208 posts in 913 days


#4 posted 11-05-2016 09:15 PM

Only thing I might worry about is the sharp corners of those square steel pieces spinning near my hands. I think I d be tempted to grind then into something just a bit more round.

- JoeinGa


I don’t plan on using them with smaller blanks. E.i.. 12” dia. or larger. And yes the corners will be eliminated as time permits.
Mr Unix: EXTREMELY being the key word!

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2186 posts in 1969 days


#5 posted 11-06-2016 02:14 PM

See no problems with Jack’s square faceplate on large turnings even if mounting surface not perfectly flat or has bit of run out at the weld. There are several ways to solve either or both problems. Well done Jack!

People have been making their own faceplates from aluminum, steel, and wood forever. Only problem I and others have seen or heard about is run-out due to bad welding or uneven mounting surface not sure about that. Aluminum & wood mounting surface might be easier and faster to square up than steel on the lathe. Not sure how to fix a bad weld.

I don’t see a faceplate listed in 2016 Grizzly catalog that would fit your lathe. When Grizzly orders lathes they buy by the container load. Spare parts & lathe accessories have to be ordered separately. You have to look at after market faceplates. Except for One Way most after market faceplates made of aluminum today. Could be wrong about that only looking at Packard Woodwork’s & Craft Supplies catalogs. Have not kept up with faceplates!

When started turning wisdom was buy extra faceplates and I did. Ordered couple smaller faceplates & 1” x 8 TPI threaded inserts from Grizzly. Still have the larger cast iron faceeplate that came with that Grizzly lathe. Second Delta lathe came with small aluminum faceplate. Had no problem with faceplate on Jet mini, Did order new threaded insets for those faceplates from Grizzly, when updated from Delta to Jet 1642 lathe. Have only used the Jet OEM faceplate once, and other than removing rust from smaller ones haven’t used them.

I used a lot of waste blocks and glue paper joints in those days, not so much these days. Only reason would use my 6” faceplate these days is for large bowls or hollow forms. Have an assortment of sheet metal screws if needed.

-- Bill

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5328 posts in 3497 days


#6 posted 11-06-2016 04:40 PM

If you do a Google search for wood lathe faceplates, you will turn up a slew of them. The only problem is that most are for mini/midi lathes, and they are (IMNTBHO) generally overpriced.

I do a good deal of segmented work, and very seldom attach a faceplate directly to the turning blank. Instead, I screw the faceplate to a waste block with #10 or #12 sheet metal screws, then glue the waste block to the blank. This does require flattening the bottom of the blank, which I do either between centers or with the drum sander. The advantages are three-fold: The project stays concentric when I take it off the lathe and remount it, the faceplate becomes part of the glue-up process for segmented bowls as I assemble the rings, and when I part it off I cut the waste block at the glue joint giving me a clean bottom with no screw holes to contend with.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Leo Van Der Loo's profile

Leo Van Der Loo

45 posts in 592 days


#7 posted 11-06-2016 07:03 PM

Most wood lathes have a unthreaded shoulder, the faceplate does need a recess machined so that it will fit right over and up agains the spindle face, or one needs to use a machined filler ring between the faceplate and the spindle’s face.

I’ve made a few smaller and some large faceplates, the small ones are 1’ X 8 tpi, the large ones have a #4 mt on them, as that is what I use on my large lathe.

The nut on small ones are not really deep enough to machine the recess in them, so I use a filler ring between them and the spindle shoulder, as you can see here the faceplate does not seat properly on the spindle.

-- Have fun and take care

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3372 posts in 2920 days


#8 posted 11-06-2016 10:07 PM

Grizzly used to offer faceplates that attached to special threaded inserts that they still sell. I took advantage
of this several years ago using the faceplates for woodturning and buying the adapters and making aluminum
faceplates to use as sanding discs. The lefthanded nuts were ideal for my 1950 era Delta lathe because I could
attach a sanding disc to the outboard end and touch up my chisels without stepping away from the lathe. The
RH insert 1-1/4”X8tpi is D1102 and sells for 6.95, the LH insert 1+1/4”X8tpi is D1112 and sells for $5.95. Do
not know is this will help, but that is all I could find.

-- As ever, Gus-the 78 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1821 posts in 2778 days


#9 posted 11-09-2016 07:19 AM

Every once in while, I fire up the Bosch jig saw and take on something like this. A good jig saw would handle converting these square plates to round ones just fine.


Good job on the face plates Jack. And at that price, it s a great deal.

Only thing I might worry about is the sharp corners of those square steel pieces spinning near my hands. I think I d be tempted to grind then into something just a bit more round.

- JoeinGa


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