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How to joint hardwood with grain that goes both directions?

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Forum topic by trevor7428 posted 11-04-2016 03:46 AM 1313 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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trevor7428

236 posts in 799 days


11-04-2016 03:46 AM

As you can see in this piece of Cherry. The grain starts to go downhill on one end, then the other it goes uphill.

Not relizing the grain issue. I started to joint the board, once i got to the end. A big piece tor out because the grain switches direcrions at the end of the board.

Is it impossible to get a straight edge with this grain issue using a jointer? The board is already cut to length (not width)

I know i could use a staight edge cutting jig on the table saw, but i dont have one of those. Just curious if you can use a jointer with grain like that (this board is cherry)

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion


7 replies so far

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

981 posts in 430 days


#1 posted 11-04-2016 04:17 AM

You do not need any jigs. Just joint roughly one edge ignoring tearouts. Then once you have one straight edge rip the opposite on the table saw. After than rip the first edge to with.

View mrbob's profile

mrbob

182 posts in 408 days


#2 posted 11-04-2016 04:55 AM

1st why did you cut to length b4 jointing a straight edge, the ends may not be square to it now. Do you know to 4 S a board?
The last thing you do is cut to length.
One way to handle your grain problem, I would have taken that board and jointed it in about 1+inch on the side that chipped out, then turned it 180* and jointed the edge and you would have been fine.
Just like routing all 4 sides of a board, you do the end grain first, if you get any tear out if you dont use a backing piece, usually when doing the long grain will clean it up.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

811 posts in 1280 days


#3 posted 11-04-2016 09:15 AM

Good advice above

Boards with changing grain direction are common, and can lead to chip-out.

But from the picture, I don’t see changing grain in your board. Are you sure you are reading the grain correctly?

If I were jointing that board, the top right corner in the pic would be the leading edge as I passed it over the jointer.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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trevor7428

236 posts in 799 days


#4 posted 11-04-2016 10:01 AM



Good advice above

Boards with changing grain direction are common, and can lead to chip-out.

But from the picture, I don t see changing grain in your board. Are you sure you are reading the grain correctly?

If I were jointing that board, the top right corner in the pic would be the leading edge as I passed it over the jointer.

- jerryminer

Thats the way i ended up doing it (flipping it 180) but if you look at the other end of the board. The grain is slanted 1 way then at the other end, slants the other.

And i dont know why i said cut to length, all my boards i cut are 1/2 in over sized to square up later lol.

My whole point of the post was, is it even possible to joint a board with grain switching direction. If you absolutely had too. (With this piece of cherry, a piece tor off. When i tried)

-- Thank You Trevor OBrion

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

69 posts in 413 days


#5 posted 11-04-2016 11:02 AM

I’m going to go out on my own limb here, and suggest if you have sharp knives, or inserts on your jointer then grain direction isn’t as big a problem as depth of cut. Any time I get any kind of tearout I decrease my depth of cut immediately, and so far in over 50 years I have seen the immediate result of no more tearout. I use a lot of woods like Curlies, which have alternating grain bands, and burls which have swirled grain, and I can joint off nice smooth edges by taking light passes, works the same on a planer too. Try it, I think it will work for anyone with sharp cutters.

-- Think safe, be safe

View 1deadeye's profile

1deadeye

5 posts in 767 days


#6 posted 11-07-2016 11:31 PM

Ditto. Sharp knives + shallow cut = smooth results. Skewing the fence will sometimes help as well.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2652 days


#7 posted 11-07-2016 11:53 PM

With straight knives, all you can do is take shallow cuts and hope for the best. Helical heads like Shelix really solve the problem.

Previous comments are correct that if you have enough stock to work with, you can trim later at the tablesaw. Then you’ll only have burning and warping, not tearout. Ohh cherry! How fickle you are.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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