LumberJocks

Please Help! Old Plane Restoration.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by MoreWoodPlease posted 07-14-2010 07:14 PM 960 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MoreWoodPlease's profile

MoreWoodPlease

95 posts in 2636 days


07-14-2010 07:14 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bailey bailey plane plane help

I am trying to restore some of my fathers old planes. One in particular is giving me trouble. Its a Bailey #4. The sole is the problem. Some rust is deep, and there seems to be a valley down the middle of the sole, toe to tip. For days now, I’ve been using 80 grit belt-sander belts, stretched on a flat table, then running the plane on it as if planing. Honestly, the time I’ve spent trying to clean / flatten this sole, I could have bought three other planes. But…pause for effect…this is my fathers plane, who passed years ago, and I’m not going to retire this tool just yet.
So…am i using too light of a grit, should I be using a grinder, or some other method, or what?

Click Here for YouTube Photos.

Thanks for all your help LumberJocks!

Wes

-- Integrity is who we are when no one else is watching.


2 replies so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

2117 posts in 2435 days


#1 posted 07-14-2010 07:40 PM

80 should do it. First things first, are you sure the table you are using is flat or that the belt is truly flat? IF the belt is thicker at the edges then it may be the cause not the cure. Ue a straight edge to verify that the sole is shaped as you say. If the edges are getting abraded but not the middle, it is easy to look at the scratch pattern and conclude that there is a valley down the middle, but it is possible that belt is just rounding the edges and not touching the middle.

Ooop…I just saw the images. I’d call it almost done. The sole just in front of the blade and after the blade appear to be flat, and the tail edge of the plane appears flat. There is very little functional reason for the remaining part under the tote to be dead flat. Purists may disagree, but that plane ought to function just fine with the sole in the shape it is.
I’d start lapping it with finer grains to get it smooth and call that part done. That much pitting you are never going to remove without removing a significant thickness of the sole

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2838 days


#2 posted 07-14-2010 07:44 PM

Wes – I’m far from an expert, but I’m not seeing much on the bottom of that plane that would prevent it from performing well. The key areas look flat and on the same plane to me. I’d be inclined to tune it and try it out. You can always go back to more flattening if it’s not working right.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com