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OSHA had some reccomendations, I have some questions

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Forum topic by michael crawford posted 07-14-2010 06:25 PM 2013 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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michael crawford

19 posts in 2500 days


07-14-2010 06:25 PM

if i need to split this up into seperate posts, i will. but i didnt want to clutter the place up.

I am an instructor to SPMI adults in a vocational woodshop. up until Friday, i had always assumed that we were at the hobby shop level, and did not need to worry much about OSHA. Well, the OSHA inspector informed me that I was really, really wrong. he had a few reccomendations to me:
1. switch to all water based finishes, as we do not have the proper ventilation or equipment for oil based.
2. build a downdraft sanding table.
3. get a portable dust collector for the equipment.
4. new safety glasses.
5. a spindle guard for my drill press

these are the ones that made me think. the others that he told me about were pretty self explanitory, like my missing table saw guard, etc.

my questions are:
1. what info is out there for water based outdoor poly applications: we do a lot of outdoor oak furniture, and had been using spar varnish. i googled thius, and came up with too much information and too many sales pitches.
2. anyone have any plans for these? My current table is 4X8 and well built. i am planning on using my JET dust collector for the vacuum, with two 4 inch ports.
3. any recommendations? they suggested something industrial. and one that is ortable to wheel from machine to machine.
4. i use AOS glasses for myself, and am ready to purchase for most my students. some wear glasses, though. any special eyewear for glasses wearers?
5. what is this? i have never seen one, nor can i google it.

thanks for any help, suggestions, etc. im a little lost and baffled.


17 replies so far

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2448 days


#1 posted 07-14-2010 06:55 PM

OSHA Can be a pain sometimes, as well as can be a help.
I haven’t used water based products myself but would imagine they have exterior grade water base. I’ve heard people say they like it.
As for downdraft table plans check this one out.
http://www.woodworkersworkshop.com/plansshare/air_filter_downdraft_sanding_table.htm
I would think you could get a couple of dust collectors cheap through Harbor Freight Co.
For eye glass wears you could buy face shields that cover the whole face and don’t get in the way of glasses.
You may want to inquire about material data safety sheets for each product you use to provide information on the products you use. Not a bad thing to have on hand along with your manuals.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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michael crawford

19 posts in 2500 days


#2 posted 07-14-2010 09:10 PM

i will definately say that they opened my eyes on some issues. i hadnt ever really thought about some of the things, but they make perfect sense when i did.

MSDS sheets are presently being worked on. they didint mention them, but we thought about it.

hadnt thought about face shields. are they OSHA approved?

View FatScratch's profile

FatScratch

189 posts in 2767 days


#3 posted 07-14-2010 09:31 PM

For your outdoor varnish question – I have used General Finishes Exterior 450, which is a waterbased exterior varnish with UV inhibitors. I have only used it once, but it is holding up very well over the course of one year. It went on very easy, dried fast, and clean-up was quick since it is water-based.

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#4 posted 07-14-2010 09:45 PM

Just curious what level of ventillation is expected for the shop to handle oil coatings. Is this all oil based coatings, or just for a spray booth? I would find it hard to believe that the equipment requirements for ‘wipe on poly’ could be too stringent. Regulators as well as users like to interchangably use water based as being “safe” when the resins are no less hazardous than oil based. Water based IS zero VOC and there is no issue with fire, but I wouldn’t eat the stuff.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View Don Newton's profile

Don Newton

714 posts in 3083 days


#5 posted 07-14-2010 10:11 PM

OSHA “visited” a shop I used to work in and couldn’t find anything wrong. This annoyed the inspector to the point where he conducted an inspection of the restrooms and wrote us up for having the wrong toilet seat! It seems the regulations, at that time, state that the seat must be the split type, you know the ones that have the gap at the front. The plant Manager turned to the Inspector and asked what difference the split seat made? The Foreman, who at this point was pretty aggravated, offered that the split seat was there to protect the Inspector in case the seat fell while he was getting a drink!

The best way to get on the good side with OSHA is to request a pre inspection. They will look over your facility and give you a “practice” report. The look very favorably on you if you have violations in the future. Your insurance carrier and some local colleges also offer this service.

-- Don, Pittsburgh

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2448 days


#6 posted 07-14-2010 11:30 PM

Yes, as with Respirators that are OSHA approved so are face shields.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View michael crawford's profile

michael crawford

19 posts in 2500 days


#7 posted 07-15-2010 03:35 AM

thanks for the face shields info. any one more safe than any others? id automatically think that the harbor freight ones wouldnt be. any ideas? or how do you check for osha approval?

the general 450 is on that the inspector recomended to me. hes a woodworker as well. im glad to hear about it. may order a gallon and try it.

as far as the vent. requirements, i dont know. by that point i was so overwhelmed that i couldnt really think straight. it was a pretty big shock when thy shut my shop down due to safety concerns.

any ideas on a spindle guard?
thanks for all the help so far. i really appreciate it. i built the program from essentially nothing with donations and guesswork, as well as taught yself woodworking. i have no real support other than my father, who is a lifelong woodworker, and my wife, who believes in what i do.

View Max's profile

Max

55996 posts in 3737 days


#8 posted 07-15-2010 03:40 AM

Here is a link to spindle guards for a drill press that I am sure they are talking about.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/1FYX5

I am sure you can find different types. This was from a search I did on Google.

-- Max "Desperado", Salt Lake City, UT

View spclPatrolGroup's profile

spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2359 days


#9 posted 07-15-2010 05:25 PM

The problem now is, it is now documented you have a knowledge of safety defiance’s, and if anyone gets hurt or does something stupid before you can get the fixes in place, it would be an easy lawsuit, you may want to make sure you close your doors to outsiders until these are in place.

View sawblade1's profile

sawblade1

754 posts in 2491 days


#10 posted 07-15-2010 05:39 PM

Actually check out rei-tech they have affordable drill guards, Check rockler for a downdraft table plan, General finishes water based 450 is a good choice for outdoor furniture, and the onidea dust collectors are a great choice for you Excaliber makes a good table saw guard for an reasonable price and also includes dust collection
keep us posted :)

-- Proverbs Ch:3 vs 5,6,7 Trust in the lord with all thine heart and lean not unto your own understanding but in all your ways aknowledge him and he shall direct your path elmerthomas81@neo.rr.com

View Gregn's profile

Gregn

1642 posts in 2448 days


#11 posted 07-16-2010 04:42 PM

They should say that they are OSHA approved.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#12 posted 07-16-2010 06:54 PM

Interesting, In the public schools here, as well as when I have been at woodworking schools – I have never seen a spindle guard.
Also haven’t seen these on used equipment from commercial shops on IRSauction, though I have not been hunting.
Are the spindle guards a new requirement? I understand their purpose etc, but curious about the REQUIREMENTS. If someone does one on one training in their shop, do they need to do all this as well?

I am asking just because – from the original post it appears that Michael was the only employee in the area, and that OSHA was more regulating WORKER exposure, with their exposure limits based on working in a certain environment full time, so there are 8 hour Averages for particulates and such, but that there were different rules for schools than there are for factories. – - – Not saying it is Right or Wrong, but that the rulebooks were not the same.
thanks

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View blockhead's profile

blockhead

1475 posts in 2773 days


#13 posted 07-17-2010 06:28 PM

In case you aren’t aware, there are some types of face shields where you still have to wear safety glasses too. We have a full face shield here at work, which is OSHA approved, and the OSHA inspector told us, “You know you still have to wear safety glasses with those, right?” Uh, OK sure. Whatever you say.

-- Brad, Oregon- The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first.

View michael crawford's profile

michael crawford

19 posts in 2500 days


#14 posted 07-21-2010 08:28 PM

We got the saftey glasses and most of our guards nailed down. thanks for all the help.

i do have a problem, though. my table saw guard. i cant get it aligned properly to the blade. im running a JTS-10. i know my guard is bent, and ive straigtened it the best i can, but its still hanging up. I called Jet to get a new guard, but i cannot get one. i also do not have a large budget for the excalibur. any other ideas? i know id like to adapt a riving knife in somehow, but other than that, im lost.

michael

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blockhead

1475 posts in 2773 days


#15 posted 07-21-2010 08:39 PM

I’m assuming that’s the J(W)TS-10? If so, I have the same one. Mine too was out even though I bought it brand new. It took me an hour or two of bending and adjusting the plates before I finally got it right. The adjustments are horrible and a real pain. Just keep at it and you’ll eventually get there like I did.

Why exactly can’t Jet sell you a new one? Did they quit making them?

-- Brad, Oregon- The things that come to those who wait, may be the things left by those who got there first.

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