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Need help choosing my first re-saw blade

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Forum topic by DrTebi posted 11-02-2016 07:35 AM 1957 views 4 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DrTebi

264 posts in 3104 days


11-02-2016 07:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw blade

Hello,

I finally decided to bite the bullet and should very soon receive a Hammer N4400 bandsaw.

My current project is completely on hold because I need to resaw about 12 pieces of monkeypod 4/4 boards (I need 1/4” + wide boards).

The problem I find now is, that the N4400 does not come with a blade, which is contrary to every other saw I have ever bought… oh well.

I heard good things about the wood slicer, and Hammer recommended the Lennox carbide blades. The latter is a bit over my budget, and the wood slicer blades are on back order for at least two weeks.

This brings me to my question:
What bandsaw blades can you recommend for my scenario? It should be available in about 156 1/2” length, and I suppose a 1/2” wide blade would be good for resawing, but correct me if I am wrong… I am obviously new to resawing. I would also like it within a week or less… don’t want to have to wait longer to finish this project.

It appears that I could get a Starrett Woodpecker Pro, or a Supercut in 156 1/2”. If anyone has any experience with these, I would appreciate your opinion.

Thanks!


29 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile (online now)

Redoak49

2901 posts in 1826 days


#1 posted 11-02-2016 12:44 PM

I have been using the Wood Slicer on my 16” Jet and it works well but does dull quicker than a carbide blade.

The carbide toothed blades are too much based on how much I resaw. A member here has had good luck with the SuperCut carbide impregnated blades. I have one ordered to try it out and I should be getting it soo.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4478 posts in 2189 days


#2 posted 11-02-2016 12:49 PM

Timber Wolf makes some great blades.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View martyoc's profile

martyoc

40 posts in 754 days


#3 posted 11-02-2016 12:55 PM

I also use a Wood Slicer on my 14” Delta band saw and have had very good results. I recently resliced over 400 pieces of walnut to 1/8” thickness with excellent results. The blade has been left on the saw for most other cuts as well.

-- Marty O'C

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Jim Finn

2577 posts in 2759 days


#4 posted 11-02-2016 01:41 PM

I found woodslicer blades to dull quickly so I now use “SuperCut” carbide blades. A SuperCut 1/2” re-saw blade 105” long costs $25 and last at least ten times as long for me. I am re-sawing 6”-8” cedar, walnut and maple, mostly.

-- No PHD, but I have a GED and my DD 214

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7658 posts in 2751 days


#5 posted 11-02-2016 02:40 PM

I use a Timber Wolf 3/4” x 2/3 VPC (variable positive claw) blade. I used to use their 3/4” x 3tpi blade, HOWEVER once I switched to the 2/3 VPC (variable positive claw) blade I WAS AMAZED. The variable claw pattern cleans out the blade in use and allows for a much cleaner, straighter, and faster cut. No more clogging the blade with sawdust.

That’s my 2-cents worth. And yes I mostly resaw my lumber, up to 11in. thus far on my Rikon 14in. #10-325.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#6 posted 11-02-2016 02:56 PM

Just order the same bladestock as the Woodslicer from Spectrum Supply (Kerfmaster) for half the price.

That said while hardened spring steel blades (like the Woodslicer) are very sharp they dull quickly and unless you have need for their unique characteristics they are a poor value.

In the end bi-metal or carbide tipped blades will be far more cost effective than any of the carbon steel (or high silicon steel) blades. Be careful to not go overboard on width if you gate a bi-metal or carbide blade for the N4400 while it is a very nice saw it still is a realtive lighweight and a 3/4” bi-metal or carbide blade will pretty much max it out if proper 25,000-30,000 psi is used. Carbon, high silicon steel and sring steel blades only need about half that tension.

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mramseyISU

524 posts in 1383 days


#7 posted 11-02-2016 03:30 PM

I’d suggest the Simmonds Red Streak bands. We used them in our sawmill for years on the band mill for resawing white oak and you can get them for smaller saws too.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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DrTebi

264 posts in 3104 days


#8 posted 11-02-2016 06:36 PM

These are all nice suggestions… but what about delivery times and availability? As I mentioned, the Woodslicer for example is back-ordered for at least two weeks, so that won’t work for me…

I am afraid that this may be the case for many of the other blades as well, since I need a custom length (156 1/2).

Any opinions on:
Starrett Woodpecker Pro
“Diamond Sterling 3/8”x.032x3TPI X-tra Duty Carbon Blade
?

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#9 posted 11-02-2016 09:47 PM



These are all nice suggestions… but what about delivery times and availability? As I mentioned, the Woodslicer for example is back-ordered for at least two weeks, so that won t work for me…

I am afraid that this may be the case for many of the other blades as well, since I need a custom length (156 1/2).

Any opinions on:
Starrett Woodpecker Pro
“Diamond Sterling 3/8”x.032x3TPI X-tra Duty Carbon Blade
?

- DrTebi

First, if you are buying pre-cut bands then you are over paying, which is the case with the Woodslicer. If you want the Woodslicer I told you where you can get it for half as much from and industrial supply house that welds their own bands. Availability will be only dependant on if they have the band stock in stock. It is just important to understand the pros and cons of a hardened srping steel blade like this. I have a couple for my smaller saws but only use them when the narrow kerf is needed to save wood. The finish off the saw when sharp will rival the best carbide resaw blades.

You can’t really go wrong with Lenox bands, there enitre line are some of the best in the industry. woodcraftbands along with Spectrum Supply (and many others) carry them. The Diemaster II is a highly regarded bi-metal blade and their Woodmaster CT and Trimaster or two of the best carbide resaw blades you will find, though the Woodmaster CT doesn’t come in a size the N4400 can tension correctly since the smallest is a 1” x .035”.

I personally use a combination of the Laguna Resaw King and both the Lenox Trimaster and Woodmaster CT. The Trimaster and RK will give a better finish off the saw but I need to use the Woodmaster CT when power feeding since the chip load is too high for the RK or Trimaster.

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knotheadswoodshed

211 posts in 2010 days


#10 posted 11-02-2016 10:25 PM

I used to be a big fan of the woodslicer blades but as noted,they seemed to dull quickly.
I then tried the Spectrum blades but had weld issues.
I tried the new blades from Infinity tool and have not looked back, for me, they work extremely well on my Rikon 14”.
http://www.infinitytools.com/saw-blades-accessories/bandsaw-blades-machines-accessories/band-saw-blades/infinity-rip-bandsaw-blades

-- Randy - "I dont make mistakes, I make design change opportunities" www.knotheadswoodshed.com

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DrTebi

264 posts in 3104 days


#11 posted 11-03-2016 03:20 AM



First, if you are buying pre-cut bands then you are over paying, which is the case with the Woodslicer. If you want the Woodslicer I told you where you can get it for half as much from and industrial supply house that welds their own bands. Availability will be only dependant on if they have the band stock in stock. It is just important to understand the pros and cons of a hardened srping steel blade like this. I have a couple for my smaller saws but only use them when the narrow kerf is needed to save wood. The finish off the saw when sharp will rival the best carbide resaw blades.

You can t really go wrong with Lenox bands, there enitre line are some of the best in the industry. woodcraftbands along with Spectrum Supply (and many others) carry them. The Diemaster II is a highly regarded bi-metal blade and their Woodmaster CT and Trimaster or two of the best carbide resaw blades you will find, though the Woodmaster CT doesn t come in a size the N4400 can tension correctly since the smallest is a 1” x .035”.

I personally use a combination of the Laguna Resaw King and both the Lenox Trimaster and Woodmaster CT. The Trimaster and RK will give a better finish off the saw but I need to use the Woodmaster CT when power feeding since the chip load is too high for the RK or Trimaster.

- AHuxley


Thanks for clearing that up.

The Lenox options look interesting. The Trimaster is not specifically for wood though, so I wonder which blade width/thickness/tpi you would recommend for re-sawing?

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DrTebi

264 posts in 3104 days


#12 posted 11-03-2016 03:22 AM


I used to be a big fan of the woodslicer blades but as noted,they seemed to dull quickly.
I then tried the Spectrum blades but had weld issues.
I tried the new blades from Infinity tool and have not looked back, for me, they work extremely well on my Rikon 14”.
http://www.infinitytools.com/saw-blades-accessories/bandsaw-blades-machines-accessories/band-saw-blades/infinity-rip-bandsaw-blades

- knotheadswoodshed


Thanks for the suggestion, but these blades are not available in 156 3/4” ...

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#13 posted 11-03-2016 04:13 AM

First, if you are buying pre-cut bands then you are over paying, which is the case with the Woodslicer. If you want the Woodslicer I told you where you can get it for half as much from and industrial supply house that welds their own bands. Availability will be only dependant on if they have the band stock in stock. It is just important to understand the pros and cons of a hardened srping steel blade like this. I have a couple for my smaller saws but only use them when the narrow kerf is needed to save wood. The finish off the saw when sharp will rival the best carbide resaw blades.

You can t really go wrong with Lenox bands, there enitre line are some of the best in the industry. woodcraftbands along with Spectrum Supply (and many others) carry them. The Diemaster II is a highly regarded bi-metal blade and their Woodmaster CT and Trimaster or two of the best carbide resaw blades you will find, though the Woodmaster CT doesn t come in a size the N4400 can tension correctly since the smallest is a 1” x .035”.

I personally use a combination of the Laguna Resaw King and both the Lenox Trimaster and Woodmaster CT. The Trimaster and RK will give a better finish off the saw but I need to use the Woodmaster CT when power feeding since the chip load is too high for the RK or Trimaster.

- AHuxley

Thanks for clearing that up.

The Lenox options look interesting. The Trimaster is not specifically for wood though, so I wonder which blade width/thickness/tpi you would recommend for re-sawing?

- DrTebi

For the N4400 you want the 3/4” x .035” 3 tpi Of all the carbide resaw blades I have used it has the second best off the saw finish, the Resaw King is the best. But honestly if you hand feed any of the carbide blades are going to be very similar because your hesitation marks will be by far the worst part of the finish.

Honestly, long term the Laguna RK will be the most cost effective (assuming you actually use it a lot) since it is the easiest and cheapest to get resharpened. Very few places resharpen carbide bandsaw blades. Laguna sharpens their own.

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bearkatwood

1405 posts in 849 days


#14 posted 11-03-2016 07:45 AM

My first advise would be to stop … STOP! and think about what you nee to do. DO you need to buy a bandsaw(one that is a rip-off of a laguna and maybe worth the money) or do you need to complete a task. In 1856 they did not have a laguna or hammer for that means. I am not trying to dissuade you from your purchase, only to show maybe there is another way. Do you have a table saw? Ripping on the bottom and top of the boards might get you a good start to resawing the piece you need.
I know that I am not answering any of you questions, but there is a solution to completing your woodworking task that doesn’t involve buying a new bandsaw.
All the best on your journey as a woodworker. Laters.

-- Brian Noel

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DrTebi

264 posts in 3104 days


#15 posted 11-03-2016 09:07 AM



My first advise would be to stop … STOP! and think about what you nee to do. DO you need to buy a bandsaw(one that is a rip-off of a laguna and maybe worth the money) or do you need to complete a task. In 1856 they did not have a laguna or hammer for that means. I am not trying to dissuade you from your purchase, only to show maybe there is another way. Do you have a table saw? Ripping on the bottom and top of the boards might get you a good start to resawing the piece you need.
I know that I am not answering any of you questions, but there is a solution to completing your woodworking task that doesn t involve buying a new bandsaw.
All the best on your journey as a woodworker. Laters.

- bearkatwood


I appreciate your concern, and you do make a good point. I have actually held off on buying this particular saw since four years now… instead I just updated my old Shopsmith bandsaw a bit to get by for any simple curved cuts that I needed, or aluminum and brass.

But when I tried re-sawing 6” and 8” wide boards on it, well, they did not fit. Smaller ones do fit, but I just cannot get nice straight cuts. Even if it does go well for a bit, then it chokes when there is not enough power and I am stuck in the middle of the board.

I have ripped boards in half before on the table saw as you describe. It did work fairly well, but it won’t work for a wide board, and I also find it a bit unsafe.

Hence my decision to finally pull the trigger. I am really looking forward to re-sawing some logs, and some other big chunks of wood I had stored for years now. Nothing that would easily be cut on the table saw, nor the Shopsmith bandsaw…

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