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Resawing oak 4x4 question

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Forum topic by Clobby posted 10-31-2016 03:48 PM 650 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Clobby

16 posts in 411 days


10-31-2016 03:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resaw oak

I get basically an unlimited supply of oak 4×4, 2×4, etc. The 4×4 are the best pieces of lumber so I am using those to resaw down into usable pieces as the outsides are quite beat up.

I resawed my first piece in the orientation below, but wondering whats the best way to resaw this to avoid cupping, bowing, etc? I plan on making more table tops this way.

-- Wood working newbie, IT Pro for 15 years, ask away for computer help to help repay all the noob wood working questions.


8 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1559 days


#1 posted 10-31-2016 04:34 PM

The 4×4 in the picture is NOT oak, it is almost certainly treated southern yellow pine. It might be ok for exterior furniture but not a good option for indoor furniture. It will be less prone to twisting, cupping and warping the drier it is when cutting it, all bets are off if/when it gets wet again. Any lumber will be more dimensionally stable if quartersawn or rift sawn as apposed to being flat sawn.

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Clobby

16 posts in 411 days


#2 posted 10-31-2016 04:41 PM

Im sorry you are right, I have oak, but I am practicing on pine right now until I get all the kinks worked out.

-- Wood working newbie, IT Pro for 15 years, ask away for computer help to help repay all the noob wood working questions.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#3 posted 10-31-2016 08:03 PM

Uhhhh? How dry is the oak?

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Clobby

16 posts in 411 days


#4 posted 10-31-2016 08:11 PM

A lot of it has been sitting around for quite around indoors. I pick out the wood thats been indoors, preferably in temp controlled environment in the precise machining plant. bBt as far as moisture content, I don’t know, and I haven’t gotten around to getting a moisture meter.

At this point, I’m still figuring out what the hell I’m doing! So really, I’m making cuts, doing stupid projects in the unfinished garage (so my mistakes won’t matter), and just practicing and making mistakes early on before I get into expensive wood and projects.

-- Wood working newbie, IT Pro for 15 years, ask away for computer help to help repay all the noob wood working questions.

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Snipes

150 posts in 2083 days


#5 posted 10-31-2016 08:25 PM

Just like your doing on that pine 4×4 would be perfect.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View Drew's profile

Drew

329 posts in 2938 days


#6 posted 10-31-2016 09:11 PM

I would recommended running 2 faces through the jointer so they are flat and square to each other. That’s the only way you can truly get a straight resaw

-- TruCraftFurniture.com

View JayT's profile

JayT

5455 posts in 2049 days


#7 posted 10-31-2016 09:36 PM

The most stable wood is quartersawn. Easiest way to think of it is that you want the grain lines running perpendicular to the width of the piece. The piece you have cut off in the pic is that way.

Try to avoid getting flatsawn, which is what you would have by cutting off the face that is on the top in your pic, where the grain lines run across the width.

You might have to rotate the 4×4 to different orientations as you cut to keep generally quartersawn cutoffs. That might result in some narrower boards, but will give you better material to work with.

I’ve picked up oak dunnage in the past for dirt cheap and used resawn pieces to make several projects. If you are getting it for free, then that’s a great way to save some money on materials, even if you have to glue up several pieces to get wider boards.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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Clobby

16 posts in 411 days


#8 posted 10-31-2016 10:35 PM



I would recommended running 2 faces through the jointer so they are flat and square to each other. That s the only way you can truly get a straight resaw

- Drew

The jointer.. lol… I bought my first wood working tool (other than a drill and a few other small things) 6 months ago. Other than that I’ve been reading and watching video a lot. I’ve edge jointed with a table saw jointing jig I made, maybe I could do something similar with the bandsaw? I have a cheap table saw that I avoid using at the moment until I get a better one, but I could maybe do pine with that, in phases taking off 3/4-1” at a time.


The most stable wood is quartersawn. Easiest way to think of it is that you want the grain lines running perpendicular to the width of the piece. The piece you have cut off in the pic is that way.

-JayT

Awesome, that helps a lot. I don’t even know what I don’t know at this point, so even searching is a chore at this point.

-- Wood working newbie, IT Pro for 15 years, ask away for computer help to help repay all the noob wood working questions.

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