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Forum topic by PeteK posted 10-31-2016 04:30 AM 757 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PeteK

27 posts in 480 days


10-31-2016 04:30 AM

Ok, I have a wife who is addicted to Pinterest. She talked me into building a frame to go around our bathroom mirror. But the mirror fills the wall from the top of the counter to the ceiling, so the frame will have to be mounted directly to the mirror. The frame is just 4 pieces of 1×4, so not particularly heavy. I don’t see any way to mount to the wall. Should I just glue it to the glass? What kind of glue? Liquid Nails? Any tips would be appreciated.

Thanks


16 replies so far

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daddywoofdawg

1022 posts in 1414 days


#1 posted 10-31-2016 04:34 AM

I don’t know about Liquid Nails as the answer,maybe have to read the label.Might call a glass shop and ask what they would use. I would think maybe silicone.

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Ripper70

618 posts in 748 days


#2 posted 10-31-2016 04:56 AM

I think most any construction adhesive would do the trick. However, whatever you use, consider that you will be able to see the reflection of the back of the frame and what ever it is you use to attach the frame to the mirror. The reflective surface of the mirror is behind the glass so, for example, if the glass is 1/4” thick you should be able to see the back of the frame along the edge of the mirror. What ever you use, keep it near the outer edge.

Also, make sure you take care to finish the back of the frame for the same reason. Here’s an example of what I mean:

Guess how I know this. ;-)

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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PeteK

27 posts in 480 days


#3 posted 10-31-2016 04:58 AM

Well crap! I didn’t think of that! I didn’t stain the back of it….

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BinghamtonEd

2286 posts in 2209 days


#4 posted 10-31-2016 12:58 PM

What about taking the mirror down and cutting it?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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bonesbr549

1445 posts in 2906 days


#5 posted 10-31-2016 01:27 PM

If it were me, I’d use silicone to attach. However, if that molding twists and generally there is steam in a bathroom, it will fail.

Since you are (looks like) painting the frame. I’d drill and counter bore 4 corners and put in togle bolts to the wall. Attach with silicone around the frame and lock the corners down and fill with wood filler and repaint the frame. Done and forget it.

Good luck.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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Runner

42 posts in 612 days


#6 posted 10-31-2016 01:27 PM

Thanks for the tip Ripper. I’ve been thinking about doing the same.

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Cooler

299 posts in 682 days


#7 posted 10-31-2016 02:02 PM

A word about mirrors. Use a very wide rabbet for the mirror. If you stand on the side you will see the cut of the mirror otherwise.

“Mirror mastic” is the preferred adhesive. It is somewhat flexible and will not damage the reflective backing.

My preference is to back up the mirror with a board and screw the board to the rear of the frame. It makes replacing the mirror much easier.

And on larger mirrors specify “double strength glass”. Or it may be wavy when hung.

https://www.amazon.com/CRL-Gunther-Ultra-Mirror-Mastic/dp/B001C7PBDG

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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Snipes

150 posts in 2084 days


#8 posted 10-31-2016 02:08 PM

like Ed said have the mirror cut.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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jbay

1860 posts in 738 days


#9 posted 10-31-2016 02:21 PM

It doesn’t take much to hold a frame to the mirror. Panel adhesive, silicone, either will work great.

Here is a company that makes frames to go over mirrors, (I’ve installed them before),
they use double sided tape, as you can see on the installation video.

Just finish the back side and keep your adhesive or double sided tape back far enough from the edge so you don’t see it in the reflection as Ripper said.

More than likely you will break the mirror trying to get it off. No need to do that.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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GR8HUNTER

2966 posts in 552 days


#10 posted 10-31-2016 02:41 PM



It doesn t take much to hold a frame to the mirror. Panel adhesive, silicone, either will work great.

Here is a company that makes frames to go over mirrors, (I ve installed them before),
they use double sided tape, as you can see on the installation video.

Just finish the back side and keep your adhesive or double sided tape back far enough from the edge so you don t see it in the reflection as Ripper said.

More than likely you will break the mirror trying to get it off. No need to do that.

- jbay

DITTO ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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BurlyBob

5066 posts in 2105 days


#11 posted 10-31-2016 02:58 PM

Another vote for silicon chalk, clear.

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splatman

586 posts in 1238 days


#12 posted 11-01-2016 04:15 AM

Paint the back of the molding black.
Glue it on with silicone.

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bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1560 days


#13 posted 11-01-2016 04:23 AM

Similar to construction adhesive, you can get a tube of mirror adhesive that supposedly (??) works better sticking to glass and dealing with high humidity environments than basic construction adhesive. It can be found at most of the big box stores.

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JoeinGa

7727 posts in 1846 days


#14 posted 11-01-2016 01:00 PM

I did this in a house we lived in years ago, and I used clear silicone. Soon as it was dry and I removed the masking tape holding the frame up, I found out about the gap that shows like in Ripper’s picture. GRRRRR! What to do? What to do?

Since I had painted the frame white to match our bathroom trim, I finally figured out to just buy a tube of white kitchen caulk and fill the gap. Make sure you get caulk that dries white….. Problem went away and the wife was happy.

Oh, we lived in that house for 11 years and the frame ( made from pine) never warped.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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Cooler

299 posts in 682 days


#15 posted 11-01-2016 01:45 PM

When I made mirrors in my picture framing business, I first cut the frame and then cut the glass to size. I then put a sheet of mat board behind the mirror and used framers’ points (glass points) to hold the mat in place. I glued a dust cover to the rear to make a tidy package and added the mirror hangers and wire.

It is fast and reversible. You can easily take out the mirror and replace it with another.

http://www.dickblick.com/products/fletcher-fleximaster-framing-tool/

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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