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Power feeder on a table saw

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 10-29-2016 05:19 PM 744 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

249 posts in 500 days


10-29-2016 05:19 PM

Can anyone tell me if it would be possible to use a power feeder on a table saw? I own a small 2 man cabinet shop, and I am considering purchasing a Grizzly 1/4HP or 1/2HP power feeder to use on my dedicated dado saw, which is an old cast iron Craftsman 113. I could use the power feeder for dado’ing stiles that would be used for face frames. I always dado my cabinet sides 1/4” into the face frames, but sometimes the feather board doesn’t do all that great at holding the stock down. Would this be a possible use for a power feeder?


19 replies so far

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TheFridge

8333 posts in 1326 days


#1 posted 10-29-2016 05:34 PM

Yep. anything is possible.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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SweetTea

249 posts in 500 days


#2 posted 10-29-2016 05:45 PM

Do you think that the Grizzly 1/8HP baby power feeder would be sufficient or should I step up to their 1/4HP unit?

Are these things all that difficult to setup or is it as simple as bolting down and pointing it where to go?

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TheFridge

8333 posts in 1326 days


#3 posted 10-29-2016 06:18 PM

Sorry, asking the wrong person bud. I only know it’s possible.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#4 posted 10-29-2016 06:51 PM

I would go with a more standard 3/4 or 1hp feeder, remember it isn’t just the power of a feeder the weight is a lot of what makes them a good solution.

An alternative is have a dado set bored to 1.25” (or 30mm if you have a Euro shaper and use that standard) and run the dados on your shaper so no added expense of a second feeder.

You may also consider a Co-Matic feeder (Grizzly is a rebadged Co-Matic). If you go with a full sized shaper their US distributor Shop Gear carries the 8 speed versions which are more flexible for a a few bucks more.

View jbay's profile

jbay

1861 posts in 739 days


#5 posted 10-29-2016 07:23 PM

Have you ever considered a Her-Saf Panel router?
I bought mine for 300.00
(Online picture, not of mine)

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#6 posted 10-29-2016 08:03 PM



Have you ever considered a Her-Saf Panel router?

- jbay

I think he is routing into the back of stiles, not panels. Not sure the panel router would be a good choice for the job, maybe I misunderstood what the OP wants to do.

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MT_Stringer

3116 posts in 3071 days


#7 posted 10-29-2016 08:12 PM

Call Grizzly and talk to them.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View jbay's profile

jbay

1861 posts in 739 days


#8 posted 10-29-2016 08:38 PM


Have you ever considered a Her-Saf Panel router?

- jbay

I think he is routing into the back of stiles, not panels. Not sure the panel router would be a good choice for the job, maybe I misunderstood what the OP wants to do.

- AHuxley

A panel router is perfect for routing into the back of frames.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

249 posts in 500 days


#9 posted 10-29-2016 08:42 PM



I would go with a more standard 3/4 or 1hp feeder, remember it isn t just the power of a feeder the weight is a lot of what makes them a good solution.

An alternative is have a dado set bored to 1.25” (or 30mm if you have a Euro shaper and use that standard) and run the dados on your shaper so no added expense of a second feeder.

You may also consider a Co-Matic feeder (Grizzly is a rebadged Co-Matic). If you go with a full sized shaper their US distributor Shop Gear carries the 8 speed versions which are more flexible for a a few bucks more.

- AHuxley

I am having trouble picturing how to do dado’s on a shaper? If there was a way then I might consider that. But for now, I am most interested in keeping my dedicated table saw for this purpose.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#10 posted 10-29-2016 08:44 PM


Have you ever considered a Her-Saf Panel router?

- jbay

I think he is routing into the back of stiles, not panels. Not sure the panel router would be a good choice for the job, maybe I misunderstood what the OP wants to do.

- AHuxley

A panel router is perfect for routing into the back of frames.

- jbay

Are you talking about individual stiles? I guess I could see building a jig to hold the stiles but it still seems like shaper work especially at production level when tooling cost is considered.

View jbay's profile

jbay

1861 posts in 739 days


#11 posted 10-29-2016 09:01 PM

Have you ever considered a Her-Saf Panel router?

- jbay

I think he is routing into the back of stiles, not panels. Not sure the panel router would be a good choice for the job, maybe I misunderstood what the OP wants to do.

- AHuxley

A panel router is perfect for routing into the back of frames.

- jbay

Are you talking about individual stiles? I guess I could see building a jig to hold the stiles but it still seems like shaper work especially at production level when tooling cost is considered.

- AHuxley

No, put the frame on the ledge and rout it.
Yes, it’s a different story if someone wants to dedicate a machine for one purpose.

I’m a one man shop and I love the versatility of having this machine.
You can lock the carriage and go side to side. Do rabbets, make bead board, seam laminate for perfect joints, turn circles, bevel fold, stopped dadoes are a piece of cake. The list goes on, and the best thing about it is the set up is very quick and easy.
In a small shop, space is important and to dedicate that much space for one purpose is a lot. If that’s all your doing though, maybe different. I do custom where everything is different so I don’t try to set up for production.

Have you ever used one? (Just curious)

It may not be for everybody, but I enjoy using mine and was just trying to share and introduce another tool that someone may not have seen or thought about.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Loren's profile

Loren

9639 posts in 3488 days


#12 posted 10-29-2016 09:37 PM

I would be concerned about feed rate in relation
to the HP on the table saw. You can do it but
the feeders do feed pretty fast, the one’s I’ve
had, so normally they are suited to higher HP
machinery.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#13 posted 10-29-2016 09:39 PM


Have you ever considered a Her-Saf Panel router?

- jbay

I think he is routing into the back of stiles, not panels. Not sure the panel router would be a good choice for the job, maybe I misunderstood what the OP wants to do.

- AHuxley

A panel router is perfect for routing into the back of frames.

- jbay

Are you talking about individual stiles? I guess I could see building a jig to hold the stiles but it still seems like shaper work especially at production level when tooling cost is considered.

- AHuxley

No, put the frame on the ledge and rout it.
Yes, it s a different story if someone wants to dedicate a machine for one purpose.

I m a one man shop and I love the versatility of having this machine.
You can lock the carriage and go side to side. Do rabbets, make bead board, seam laminate for perfect joints, turn circles, bevel fold, stopped dadoes are a piece of cake. The list goes on, and the best thing about it is the set up is very quick and easy.
In a small shop, space is important and to dedicate that much space for one purpose is a lot. If that s all your doing though, maybe different. I do custom where everything is different so I don t try to set up for production.

Have you ever used one? (Just curious)

It may not be for everybody, but I enjoy using mine and was just trying to share and introduce another tool that someone may not have seen or thought about.

- jbay

I didn’t make myself clear, my fault, it is not how to physically make the cut it is how to make it more efficient than using a shaper. If you were doing one or a couple the time difference might not matter but in a production run I don’t see how this option is going to be near as quick. Plus this requires the money/space for another machine using the shaper seems more cost effective upfront and tooling wise long term.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#14 posted 10-29-2016 10:05 PM



I would be concerned about feed rate in relation
to the HP on the table saw. You can do it but
the feeders do feed pretty fast, the one s I ve
had, so normally they are suited to higher HP
machinery.

- Loren

Thats why I mentioned the Co-matic feeders vs the Grizzly feeders. The 8 sp Co-matics will run 6.5 fpm vs the 13 fpm low speed on the Grizzly 3/4 and 1 hp feeders. The Grizzly 1/4hp has a 20 fpm low speed. The baby feeder runs on a variable speed 1/8hp motor and runs 6.5 fpm but the motor is running so slow at that speed it will have very little torque.

Depending on the dado depth and the species of the face frame higher seeds may be acceptable or not. The cast wing 113 was advertised as 3hp (max) so it is normally considered a “standard” rating of 1.5hp.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

249 posts in 500 days


#15 posted 10-29-2016 10:56 PM

Ok I see now what you meant by doing them on a shaper. It just confused me when you were talking about boring out my saw blades to 1.25” to run on a shaper. LoL. My biggest shaper is a 3HP Grizzly G1026. I might actually try this. Can anyone recommend a specific cutter for this? I use 1/2” ply for my cabinet sides and I have 3/4” spindles on all of my shapers.

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