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Forum topic by kse324 posted 10-28-2016 01:19 PM 869 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kse324

2 posts in 662 days


10-28-2016 01:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: built in cabinet door wood bathroom

I have designed a large built in cabinet to add to my bathroom. It is finished except for the doors. It is around 5ft tall and a bit under 2ft wide. I am having trouble deciding on how to build and attach the door. Any advice on the best way to handle to cabinet door would be amazing. Picture attached, lemme know if you need more info. I think I added the picture right?


7 replies so far

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Woodknack

12227 posts in 2462 days


#1 posted 10-28-2016 09:41 PM

You’re question is vague but I would build it with two panels, top and bottom.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3034 posts in 1563 days


#2 posted 10-28-2016 09:49 PM

I would not try to make it one piece.

Simple butt hinges will work.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

303 posts in 2499 days


#3 posted 10-29-2016 05:57 AM

If someone is standing in front of it, will there be room for a 2’ door swing or do you need to have two one foot wide doors (4 doors if you prefer splitting top and lower which, I think, is the thing to do)?

-- I dream of a world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

View Tabletop's profile

Tabletop

138 posts in 829 days


#4 posted 10-29-2016 07:42 AM

If you like the look of long doors I would go with two narrow doors, each with three Blum 3/4” overhang hinges. If you want the wide door look I would split it in half and depending on the door go with two or three Blum hinges for each. If you must stay with one door it will probably have to something like a shaker style with the panel being 1/4 ply. That might be light enough but then you run into the problem of warping. Have fun and be safe

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1366 posts in 1002 days


#5 posted 10-30-2016 02:12 AM

kse324,

When I build a project, I like to develop a comprehensive design plan so that I am not left wondering how to bring the project home. In the case of a cabinet, I like comprehensive plans that describe the cabinet box as well as how the door(s) will be built and relate to the box. During development of the design, I like to specify the hardware such as hinges (type and number) before cutting the first piece of wood. I find that such a comprehensive design not only gets buy in by the client, in my case the wife, but also avoids problems such as the one you now confront. While this suggestion may be helpful on your next project, it does little to help with your current situation.

Since there is no center dividing rail in the face frame, it appears to me that you contemplate a door (or pair of doors) that are 5’ high. My concern is that some irritating wobble could occur in the door(s) when opened and closed if the stiles and rails of the door are from ¾”thick material. If the stiles and rails are 1”thick the wobble effect would probably be reduced by the added stiffness of 1” thick door frame. The alternative is as others have suggested; upper and lower doors.

My personal preference is cabinet doors that over lay the face frame. Overlay doors add some texture to the face of the cabinet and are easier to build and install. Inset doors are nice if you want the face of the cabinet to be in one plane but take more time to get that just right fit, especially in the humidly environment of a bathroom. Whatever the choice will dictate the hinges used. A half inch door overlay seems to be a standard if this is the direction you want to go.

I personally prefer concealed European style soft closing concealed hinges and would be fairly easy to incorporate into your cabinet doors. Manufacturers usually provide a load rating for their hinges. As a result, depending on the hinge, more than two hinges may be required to hang the door, especially if the door is heavy or long. Here is a link to Blum soft close compact hinges I like. Click on Product Specifications and Installation Instructions for more info on the hinges.

http://www.directcabinethardware.com/blum-compact-with-blumotion-hinge-38n-38n355b.htm

View kse324's profile

kse324

2 posts in 662 days


#6 posted 10-31-2016 04:56 PM

Thank you all for the excellent suggestions, and sorry for the vague description. This would be my second project like this and I do not have a good start-finish flow for designing a project. If I do another one I will attempt to plan it better.

I initially designed this project to function and look like the trim throughout my house. This gives a rounded edge at the top and bottom of the cabinet, which can been sen in the picture. In my head the cabinet door would look and function like my bathroom door, only smaller. The original doors in my house are 2 panel doors, so I was thinking something like that. I could split it into 2 doors, 1 per panel. That might work. I think two doors, split vertically, would look a bit odd.

I think a thin-ish overlay door would probably be the easiest way to go. It would still be inset into the trim on top and bottom, just overlay the sides.

Any other thoughts?

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 673 days


#7 posted 11-02-2016 11:15 PM

You are making the same mistake that none of us should do but everyone does because we are all lazy. finish the design completely and only then start cutting wood. You probably went farther than most of us as you even finished a part of the cabinet before even thinking how the rest of it should look like.

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