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What joinery would you use for this table?

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Forum topic by CharlesA posted 10-27-2016 07:16 PM 686 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1636 days


10-27-2016 07:16 PM

I’m looking at a table and trying to figure out how one would joint the legs to the base.

My thought. A carriage bolt entering the leg joint from the top in a recessed hole that would extend into a recessed hole in the base tightened with a nut. The recessed hole legs would be closed with a plug. Perhaps it would be stabilized with four dowels from the base into the bottom of each of the four legs, 2” off of center or so.

How would you do it?

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson


17 replies so far

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1789 posts in 486 days


#1 posted 10-27-2016 07:22 PM

Mortise and tendon all around … unless it needs to come apart!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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Loren

9633 posts in 3486 days


#2 posted 10-27-2016 07:30 PM

My thought is the bottom part of the top may
have bolts through it going into threaded
inserts in the “legs”. Then the lacquered wood
top is dropped on over that. Hanger bolts
in the legs could work too. That rounded
white portion looks hollow to me, with a
plywood bottom.

Perhaps the painted part is just a curved apron.
In any case, the joinery of the legs shouldn’t
be too challenging with so much room to
work.

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1636 days


#3 posted 10-27-2016 07:42 PM



Mortise and tendon all around … unless it needs to come apart!

- Ron Aylor

Tell me more. I would have thought that a mortise and tenon joint from the base to those legs would be prone to snapping given that the locations would be so close to the center with the table extending so far out.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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jbay

1857 posts in 738 days


#4 posted 10-27-2016 07:46 PM

Yeah,
I should have given it more thought before I answered.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1636 days


#5 posted 10-27-2016 07:49 PM



My thought is the bottom part of the top may
have bolts through it going into threaded
inserts in the “legs”.

- Loren

threaded inserts is a good variation on what I was thinking. I think I’d be a little wary of a hanger bolt—I’ve never had much luck with them.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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robscastle

4531 posts in 2043 days


#6 posted 10-27-2016 08:12 PM

Agree with the above comments,
however as an alternative suggestion

1. Make the frame and attaach the legs from the top with screws.
2. Then attach the top from the bottom again with screws.
3. Repeat the process for the base

That way if it needs dis assembly late you can do it.

-- Regards Robert

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bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1559 days


#7 posted 10-27-2016 08:38 PM

Do you have any other pictures showing the relationship of the legs running to and from the photographer and the legs running to the sides? It kind of looks like the base of the pair running to and from are slightly higher than the base of the pair running side to side. If that’s the case, I’d make each pair as one and cut a half lap joint at the bottom then run a carriage bolt through as you have described.

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Loren

9633 posts in 3486 days


#8 posted 10-27-2016 10:45 PM

I mention hanger bolts because there are hanger
bolt insertion machines used in making tables
in commercial settings. I think the machines
drill and then insert but I don’t recall exactly,
maybe they just put the hanger bolts in.

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1636 days


#9 posted 10-27-2016 10:47 PM

That’s interesting, Loren. I may just be reflecting finding them in particle board furniture.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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Ron Aylor

1789 posts in 486 days


#10 posted 10-27-2016 11:18 PM

Mortise and tenons all around … unless it needs to come apart!

- Ron Aylor

Tell me more. I would have thought that a mortise and tenon joint from the base to those legs would be prone to snapping given that the locations would be so close to the center with the table extending so far out.

- CharlesA


 
Charles – This is what I was thinking:


 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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JBrow

1274 posts in 759 days


#11 posted 10-28-2016 01:11 AM

CharlesA,

I cannot really add any meaningful comments regarding attaching the legs to the base beyond what has already been suggested. But I do favor using threaded inserts and bolts to attach the legs and the stabilizing outriggers to the base. I prefer threaded inserts since they seem to hold up better after repeated assembly and disassembly. The stabilizing outriggers that support the legs at the base could be glued to the legs. Loose tenons or dowels could be used to reinforce the stabilizing outriggers to the legs joint.

However, if a slight variation to the design is possible, the stabilizing outriggers could be eliminated, attaching the legs a made little easier, and additional space could be afforded for chairs to tuck under the table. If the legs are semi-elliptical rather than semi-circular, a flat spot could be cut into the elliptical legs where they meet the base without having to shave much off the legs where they meet the base. These elliptical legs could support a little larger top and thus provide a little more room for the chairs. The flat spot on the legs could be glued to the base where the legs run parallel to the grain of the base, either with a butt joint, or reinforced with dowels or loose tenons. Elongated holes in the base and screws could secure the flat spot of the legs to the base where the legs are perpendicular to the grain of the base. If disassembly of the legs from the base is required, threaded inserts installed in the flat spots on the elliptical legs and bolts through the base could be used.

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#12 posted 10-28-2016 02:04 AM

I didn’t read the other replies so I’m probably just repeating everyone but the legs appear to be metal or cast acrylic, so I’d tap the legs and run a bolt through the bottom; or maybe a lag screw.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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CharlesA

3294 posts in 1636 days


#13 posted 10-28-2016 01:50 PM



I didn t read the other replies so I m probably just repeating everyone but the legs appear to be metal or cast acrylic, so I d tap the legs and run a bolt through the bottom; or maybe a lag screw.

- Rick M.

I’d be shocked if those legs aren’t wood (even if hollow).

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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BinghamtonEd

2286 posts in 2208 days


#14 posted 10-28-2016 02:13 PM

I like Loren’s suggestion of hanger bolts. I’ve used them to connect solid oak railings to newel posts. Forget the particleboard stuff, in solid wood, those things are extremely solid.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#15 posted 10-28-2016 03:30 PM


I d be shocked if those legs aren t wood (even if hollow).

- CharlesA

Do you have information about it besides the picture? Because it doesn’t look like wood. Where did you get the pic? If they are wood they are probably laminations.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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