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Forum topic by HorizontalMike posted 10-27-2016 07:00 PM 1372 views 1 time favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HorizontalMike

7665 posts in 2754 days


10-27-2016 07:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: blo japan drier drier japan cutting board finish

I have read through many threads on which “oil” to use on cutting boards (Walnut, Mineral, Olive, BLO. etc.)

My question is:
Can I use Japan Drier added to (*insert oil) to speed up drying oils, OR get non-drying oils to dry on cutting boards?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."


41 replies so far

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

551 posts in 1793 days


#1 posted 10-27-2016 07:20 PM

I’ve only built a few boards so Im still just a noob. Here’s my uneducated guess. I don’t think you want your oils to dry in a cutting board.. sort of defeats the purpose. I use the $2.00 bottle of mineral oil that you find near the pharmacy in Walmart. Besides, Im not sure Id trust that the chemicals in Japan Dryer wouldn’t leach into the wood after it dries.

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

View ErichK's profile

ErichK

79 posts in 504 days


#2 posted 10-27-2016 07:31 PM

Based on this: http://www.kleanstrip.com/uploads/documents/PJD40_SDS-1000.5.pdf

I likely wouldn’t. There are some things that don’t look like they’d evaporate with some pretty nasty effects.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9979 posts in 3892 days


#3 posted 10-27-2016 08:09 PM

I feel that Mineral Oil, as suggested before, is the best choice…

It functions well on knife handles, wooden spoons, etc. and Cutting boards for the initial finish as well as Maintaining the Finish… and as another function… it solves cases of constipation too! LOL

Some have also suggested that adding a little parafin wax to it when finishing a cutting board is a nice way to Finish a cutting board; I have never tried this…

I choose to KISS it… Keep It Simple Stupid…

Mineral Oil will NOT EVER HURT you… Period… and it works beautifully…

Why think about such a simple solution? :)

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1561 days


#4 posted 10-27-2016 08:23 PM

Mineral Oil will NOT EVER HURT you… Period…

I think if you had enough of something claiming to work as an “intestinal lubricant” you might be a little hurt or at least those in close proximity around you might be. I know what you’re trying to say, and I would have to agree, something that’s designed to go into your body and unlike some other oils, won’t go rancid is the way to go. The fact that it’s cheap and will last virtually forever is just a bonus.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7665 posts in 2754 days


#5 posted 10-27-2016 08:48 PM


I feel that Mineral Oil, as suggested before, is the best choice…

It functions well on knife handles, wooden spoons, etc. and Cutting boards for the initial finish as well as Maintaining the Finish… and as another function… ...it solves cases of constipation too! LOL
- Joe Lyddon

BINGO JOE! +10

.
.
.
Anyways, that MSDS on Japan Drier convinces me to nix that idea.

HOWEVER, what about diluting mineral oil with ETOH? I have and can get laboratory grade 100% ETOH, but can also get 70% if needed. All I can say is that I personally know just how ETOH affects the human body (I experiment with this nightly ;-) ).

That being said, do you all think that mineral oil diluted this way, will penetrate …more or …less? And bottom line, will it eventually dry & harden?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2913 posts in 2097 days


#6 posted 10-27-2016 09:15 PM

Hey, Mike, it is good to hear from you again. Oil and alcohol don’t mix, so I can’t recommend that combination for a cutting board. However, feel free to experiment with oil/alcohol this evening if you like. :D

If you are trying to get more oil into the board, warm the oil. Mineral oil doesn’t dry which is a good thing in this situation.

-- Art

View George Coles's profile

George Coles

181 posts in 2285 days


#7 posted 10-28-2016 12:24 AM

I have used Grape Seed oil for many years for this purpose and have had great results. put on three coats and on the last one, give it a buff and immediately you have a low sheen and dry board. Also non toxic.

-- George Coles, https://www.jarrahworks.com

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7665 posts in 2754 days


#8 posted 10-28-2016 05:52 PM

Hey Art, thanks! Been laying rather low for awhile.

As far a my choice for finishing the cutting board guys, I went with Olive Oil (because that was what was in the kitchen). Still have it soaking up the oil, but here is a quick and dirty view of it. I had a couple of pieces of White ash left over from my Blanket Chest project so I grabbed them and matched them up with an interesting piece of Claro Walnut that I picked up at Woodcraft (actually bought 7 of them at $8/lb.). They had an entire pallet of this stuff, so I spent over an hour going over each and every piece on the pallet, before selecting the best Claro. And yes, I ended up re-stacking that pallet 2-3 times by time I was done… but it was worth it… ;-)

FRONT

BACK

Olive Oil Finish Still Drying

BTW, I threw in a ULU knife that I turned a Rosewood handle too:

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1706 posts in 1063 days


#9 posted 10-28-2016 06:43 PM

True, the oil never dries, but that is OK.

After saturating the board with as much mineral oil as it will soak up, I give it a good wipe down with paper towels. The board is no longer ‘greasy’ and looks great.

There are other oils, but MO is petroleum based and will no go rancid after time.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4698 posts in 1561 days


#10 posted 10-29-2016 12:00 AM

Does anyone using olive oil with a shelf live of ~3 years or grape seed oil with a shelf life of ~3 months have any long term issues with the oil as it ages in the wood?

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7665 posts in 2754 days


#11 posted 10-29-2016 10:53 AM



Does anyone using olive oil with a shelf live of ~3 years or grape seed oil with a shelf life of ~3 months have any long term issues with the oil as it ages in the wood?
- bigblockyeti

Good question.

I’m not sure, but thinking about it it does not seem to me that there would be enough oil in any one place on the board to promote bacterial growth. The only oils I have seen go rancid have been larger amounts of standing liquid, as in still in the bottle. Added to that, one would be washing the cutting board after each use with soap & water, before re-applying any oil.

A possible example that comes to mind is the tanning of deer hides by Native Americans. They would smear the deer’s brains all over the stretched hide in order to soften the hide for later use. Once softened, I never heard of the hide going rancid, though if the entire brain were left intact and exposed to the elements it would spoil quickly. Just a thought…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View JoeNJ's profile

JoeNJ

36 posts in 1116 days


#12 posted 10-29-2016 11:38 AM

I have been using a homemade mix of organic beeswax and mineral oil on my end grain cutting boards. It been a while since I made a batch but I use a 3 part wax to 1 part oil ratio. You really can’t go wrong with the ratio…it just depends on your preference of consistency. Think paste wax (less oil) as opposed to something pourable (more oil). It works great and the organic beeswax acts like a natural anti-microbial which is great for wood. I think over time that olive oil will get sticky. Just my 2 cents.

View UncannyValleyWoods's profile

UncannyValleyWoods

542 posts in 1704 days


#13 posted 10-29-2016 12:12 PM

If you’re trying to rush something, you’re trying to wrong something… Just my 2 cents…

-- “If Jesus had been killed twenty years ago, Catholic school children would be wearing little electric chairs around their necks instead of crosses.” ― Lenny Bruce

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7665 posts in 2754 days


#14 posted 10-29-2016 12:29 PM



I have been using a homemade mix of organic beeswax and mineral oil on my end grain cutting boards. It been a while since I made a batch but I use a 3 part wax to 1 part oil ratio. You really can t go wrong with the ratio…it just depends on your preference of consistency. Think paste wax as opposed to something pourable. It works great and the organic beeswax acts like a natural anti-microbial which is great for wood. I think over time that olive oil will get sticky. Just my 2 cents.
- JoeNJ

I like the idea of using bees wax in the long term. I’ll look into that when I find it, maybe at the grocery today…

As far as olive oil becoming sticky over time, I don’t think that would happen to a board that is in use near daily because of the constant cycle of cleaning between uses and re-applying of the oil. Long term storage… maybe.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2188 posts in 1975 days


#15 posted 10-29-2016 01:02 PM

To answer your question, no would never use that product, for wood & food contact after looking at MSDS. There is a definite learning curve to using that stuff most professional painters & refinishes find it can be a blessing or curse!

http://go.rockler.com/msds/klean-strip-japan-drier-pjd40-msds.pdf

Why I don’t like oil oil but wife still uses it for cooking & salads!

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/most-of-us-are-blissfully-ignorant-about-how-much-rancid-olive-oil-we-use/

At least with mineral oil know what I am getting as a finish! Nothing wrong with using bees wax if can find it locally, from a bee farmer. Very expensive if have to order online. I would not use bees wax in finishing due to cost and folks not wanting to buy the stuff when time to reapply mineral oil.

-- Bill

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