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Forum topic by GMman posted 07-10-2010 10:27 PM 1163 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GMman

3902 posts in 3161 days


07-10-2010 10:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource

Since the Mendenhall Order of 1893,
the U.S. yard and pound and all units derived from them
have been defined in terms of the metric units of length and mass,
the meter (m) and the kilogram (kg);
since 1959 these values are 1 yd = 0.9144 m and 1 lb = 0.45359237 kg.

In the United States, the older definition of the yard as 3,600/3,937 m
is still used for surveying, the corresponding foot (1,200/3,937 m) being
known as the survey foot.


15 replies so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3963 posts in 2628 days


#1 posted 07-11-2010 12:41 AM

Interesting, I must have known that at some time, since I started out in physics, and units were everything. We did most of our stuff, just like in medicine, in the metric system. Some things, temperatures and babies weights, I never quite got used to in the metric system…...........

Jium

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3139 days


#2 posted 07-11-2010 01:54 AM

I don’t think that would sound right either, Jim :-)) Gman, what’s this got to do with board feet, they never were metric were they? :-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8251 posts in 2892 days


#3 posted 07-11-2010 02:56 AM

Sure Survivor. You never heard of a board meter??
1meterX 1meterX 0.0254000000001016 meter.
A lot of wood, no matter how ya cut it.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View jackass's profile

jackass

350 posts in 3176 days


#4 posted 07-11-2010 02:17 PM

Interesting GMman.
What blows my mind is our 45 gallon drum of licquid is 55 gallons in the U.S. I don’t know how many litres that is in either measure. My math isn’t up to it this early in the morning.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8251 posts in 2892 days


#5 posted 07-11-2010 03:06 PM

I used to help my dad, a Standard Oil bulk dealer, unload semi loads of 55 gal and 30 gal drums of grease and oil. This was well before the advent of multi-viscosity oils.
We didn’t have hand trucks. Had to tip and roll the barrels on the rims. I used to pick out the 10 W (10 weight oil) and the 20 W and leave the 30, 40 …90 weight for my dad. I thought the 10 and 20W were lighter!
He figured out what I was doing and just smiled. Sly devil. There were usually more of the lighter weights.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 3161 days


#6 posted 07-11-2010 03:16 PM

1 U.S. gallon = 0.84 imperial gallon =3.8 liters
1 imperial gallon = 1.2 U.S. gallons =4.5 liters

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GMman

3902 posts in 3161 days


#7 posted 07-11-2010 03:27 PM

Topamax now you can figure your board metres: Gene has it close it’s 0.00254.

1 inch = 2.54 centimeters
1 foot = 0.305 meter

1 centimeter (cm) = 1/100 meter

View GMman's profile

GMman

3902 posts in 3161 days


#8 posted 07-11-2010 03:38 PM

Topamax to figure you board meter:
1 metre=39.37in.=3.28ft.
1in.=2.54cm.=0.0024m

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 2403 days


#9 posted 07-11-2010 09:13 PM

We work in metric… never heard of a board meter,huh? Out here in South Africa, all timber is sold in cubic meters: 1m x 1m x 1m. Now that is a lot of wood!
Who uses board meters??

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View jackass's profile

jackass

350 posts in 3176 days


#10 posted 07-11-2010 09:37 PM

Thanks for converting for me, guess I’m just lazy, knowing full well someone else would do it. Interesting post GMman. All of the comparisons are fun to consider. I don’t think I’ll try a project though. Especially not in something too foreign.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2880 posts in 2990 days


#11 posted 07-12-2010 12:24 AM

I am reading the book Wood, by Harvey Green. When he discusses barrels and cooperage, he gives this great list of names for barrel sizes, in gallons:
  • Pipe: 108-116
  • Butt: 108 (Is this where the term “buttload” came from?)
  • Puncheon: 72
  • Hogshead: 54
  • Barrel: 36
  • Kilderkin: 18
  • Firkin: 9
  • Blood Tub: 7.5
  • Pin: 4.5

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3139 days


#12 posted 07-12-2010 04:05 AM

jackass, that sounds like a board meter. Gene & Gmman, those are just board foot conversions to meteric;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 2570 days


#13 posted 07-12-2010 04:54 AM

Hey Jack, you forgot one. An oil barrel of crude is 42 gallons. And GMman, you have way to much time on your hands, lol It’s time to be making saw dust. Rand

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2797 days


#14 posted 07-18-2010 11:24 AM

The metric system is a lot easier to use, but I had to do a lot of converting while working in the oil business. That together with all the different exchange rates could be maddening. Glad to be working only metric now, except that at times I describe in imperial for LJ’ers.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

17158 posts in 2569 days


#15 posted 07-20-2010 07:34 PM

I just remember that a Meter is 39.37 inches and a kilogram is 2.2 lb and do all my conversions from there. I think that is close to the way you have the measure described.
Now with my CenTech digital caliper ($10) from HF I can make a quick conversion from English to metric with the push of a button.
I don’t use the metric weight or volume much at all.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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