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Forum topic by Howie posted 07-10-2010 02:40 PM 1030 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Howie

2656 posts in 2384 days


07-10-2010 02:40 PM

Does any have first hand experience with these items. I know about websites etc. but I’m interested in hands on commments.

-- Life is good.


7 replies so far

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2592 days


#1 posted 07-10-2010 02:55 PM

You need to be a bit more specific in what kind of information your looking for? Specific machines? Applications?

I have quite a bit of router experience, as programming and running big ones is my day job, and I’ve built my own small one.

Don’t really know much about lasers, though.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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Howie

2656 posts in 2384 days


#2 posted 07-10-2010 03:17 PM

Thanks for the response Ger
What I’m interested in is smaller versions being used in the home workshop envoirment.
Specifically reliability,maintenance issues

-- Life is good.

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2592 days


#3 posted 07-10-2010 03:51 PM

If you’re talking about buying a machine, there is a huge quality range out there. Depending on size, prices range from about $1000-$6000 or more, with software usually extra.

With a good machine, there shouldn’t be much maintenance needed. One issue might be if the machines uses a standard router. Standard routers are not designed for the constant use a CNC machine needs, so bearing replacement can be a common occurance. This is not necessarily a bad thing, as alternatives can cost well over $1000.

Reliablility is a function of quality. There are some machines of dubious quality that I would avoid.

Do you have any specific machines in mind?

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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Howie

2656 posts in 2384 days


#4 posted 07-10-2010 06:05 PM

Ger21: right now I’m in the “homework” stage. Researching the equipment and looking around the area to see how much of a market there is. I’m particularly interested in the Laser equipment. Of course most of the literature you read, this stuff will make you a fortune. Of which I am dubious to start with. I do welcome any and all of your input.

-- Life is good.

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1310 posts in 2447 days


#5 posted 07-10-2010 06:54 PM

I would be happy to offer all the information I can.

I use CNC in my job. Part of my job is to teach people how to use CNC. I switch between professional-end machines and a consumer-level machine. They’re both great, and can be used to perform an amazing array of tasks.

Before I delve too much into this it would be helpful to know what you want out of it. What materials do you want to work with? How about size of material? What sort of stuff do you want to make? How comfortable are you with computers? How much control do you want to have over the programming? How much work do you want to put into the programming?

Most machines will require separate software to generate the G-Code, but not all. You can easily spend equal amounts of money on software and machine. A general idea of a budget would be helpful too.

You CAN generate a lot of money with CNC, but the learning curve is extremely steep and it’d just like any other business. Also the parts that I make that generate money are very boring. (think brackets for industrial machines) things you COULD make “by hand” if you wanted to, it’s far faster and efficient to let the machine do it.

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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Ger21

1047 posts in 2592 days


#6 posted 07-10-2010 07:10 PM

I can tell you that if you buy a machine just because you think having a CNC will make you money, it probably won’t. Getting the work is the hardest thing to do. If you already have a product that sells well, and a CNC can greatly increase your production, then that’s a good reason to buy one. But I see a lot of people think that if they have a CNC, it’ll automatically make money. And I see a lot of those same people asking what they can make or where do they find work for their CNC.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

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Howie

2656 posts in 2384 days


#7 posted 07-10-2010 08:11 PM

tyskkvinna: Thanks for the reply, this is the kind of info I’m looking for. I’ve been into computers starting with DOS 3 so I feel I’m fairly adept there as far as a learning curves go.
What I was looking into was do stuff like tops for creamatory urns, miscellaneous designs for wooden boxes, maybe pictures,things along this line. I would not expect to become wealthy off this item,I can see that. I was just thinking about defraying the expense some. I’m retired so I’m thru with being in the mainstream and having to generate an income. This is why I was looking at the laser more so than a CNC.

-- Life is good.

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