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Delta Rockwell 34-395 12-14" "tilting arbor" table saw, Skyline, Lancaster, Wis

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Forum topic by docboy posted 10-25-2016 08:17 PM 3142 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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docboy

4 posts in 418 days


10-25-2016 08:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw table saw 34-395 delta rockwell tilting arbor cabinet saw 3 phase

Hi, guys. This is my first time posting here. Like most the first-timers, I’ve been lurking for a few years, now, and just finally got around to joining.

Apparently this is what’s referred to as a “gloat” around here: I recently acquired a table saw. It’s a Delta Rockwell 34-395 12-14” tilting arbor. It’s not the definition of “pristine,” but it doesn’t look like something recovered years later from the Titanic, either. I paid $275 (I think this is the “gloat” part).

I’ve got some questions, but first I want to tell my story.

The saw was originally used at Skyline Corp in Lancaster, Wisconsin. They make “manufactured homes.” The guy I bought the saw from sells manufactured homes here in Iowa. Skyline was switching to tools with automatic shutoffs and, so, had a big sale of their old tools. This guy wanted 1 saw for himself but had to buy 3 plus a bunch of other stuff (15 miter saws, for example) on 1 lot. Maybe it’s possible that a member of this site has worked at Skyline and has used this very saw. If so, please chime in.

I just picked the saw up yesterday, but I actually bought it about 6 months ago. Saw it on Craigslist about 40 miles away, knew I wouldn’t be able to make it there before the thing disappeared (the guy had 2 for sale and the other one did go right away), called the guy up, he agreed to hold it for me if I sent him a check (he was a legitimate local business owner, so I wasn’t too worried about getting screwed. Could still have happened, but my gut wasn’t bugging me), sent him a check (sight unseen not counting the Craigslist pic), it cleared, phone went to crap, lost the guy’s number, fortunately he had other stuff for sale on craigslist so I was able to find it again (plus, he owned a decent sized business in a town of under 1,000 people, so I probably could have found him).

Short story long, I just had a birthday and finally thought it would be a good time to face the music of buying “another tool” without consulting the LOML (didn’t I already have a table saw?). An all too common theme around these parts, it seems. Some tools are easy to sneak into the shop. This ain’t one of ‘em. Truth be told, it was less the size of the saw and more the fact that I would have to disappear long enough to pick it up (when you have 4 kids, you don’t just disappear for 2 hours for no reason). I will admit that married life forces me to be choosier about what I blow my money on and is probably a good thing.

I promise to post some pictures (of course I will, proud new papa that I am).

The saw is currently sitting in my rusty old trailer (one of those ones made out of an old pickup truck). The guy I bought it from loaded it with a skid loader. Unloading the saw in one piece may be a major feat of engineering, like the pyramids. Lacking several hundred thousand Israellites, I am contemplating taking the saw apart. This would be a good way to kill two birds with one stone as it would also give me a chance to get a good look at everything and clean up all the parts. However, sometimes we regret taking old things apart.

Any thoughts on this?

The cast iron top is in 3 pieces. Taking this apart could really make the heavy lifting easier, however, it also seems like the kind of thing I might want to leave alone. I’m worried about breaking screws, stripping threads, not being able to get it back together as tight or true as it was, stuff like that.

The raise/lower and tilting mechanisms aren’t real smooth, tight now. So, I’m really wanting to get those cleaned up. Any advice on what-to-use/what-not-to-use as far as cleaning and lubrication?

Thanks in advance for any help. Sorry I kind of went on and on.

I’m sure I’ll have lots of other questions as I go through the saw. Should I post future questions on this thread or start anew?


11 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1621 posts in 2646 days


#1 posted 10-25-2016 09:37 PM

don’t hesitate to disassemble the cast iron, etc.

The top alone is easily 180 lbs.

Does yours have the orig. fetlock fence ?

Is it currently set up 3-phase ?

as far as cleaning goes…i don’t know the condition. you can start with compressed air, wire brush , mineral spirits, etc

View docboy's profile

docboy

4 posts in 418 days


#2 posted 10-26-2016 02:50 AM

Thanks, Cabmaker.

If the top is in 3 sections, would you recommend taking it apart, as well?

Is a fetlock fence the one with a round metal tube on either side? Unfortunately, I don’t believe it has the original fence. Looks like it has an old Biesemeyer style fence. Will definitely have to post some pictures of this in order to get some advice on how to proceed.

It came with a blade. So, that’s a plus. No wrench. So, that’s a minus.

I believe it is currently set up for 3 phase. I do have 3 phase service to my shop (used to be a cabinet shop before we moved there). What’s the best way to proceed with not getting electrocuted? Hire it done? Anyone here have any info on the wiring for these?

I’ve been having a hard time finding a manual. A parts list is about all I can come up with.

Thanks again.

—John

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MrUnix

6002 posts in 2036 days


#3 posted 10-26-2016 03:24 AM

If the top is in 3 sections, would you recommend taking it apart, as well?

Table is held on with 4 bolts. Extension wings have 3 each. Trivial to remove. You will need to remove the fence first though (also trivial). Removing the table and extensions will not only reduce the weight significantly, making it easier to move, but also aid in getting access to the innards (see below).

Is a fetlock fence the one with a round metal tube on either side? Unfortunately, I don t believe it has the original fence. Looks like it has an old Biesemeyer style fence.

A Biesemeyer is considered a much better fence than the Jetlock (which does use the round tube rails). If it has a Biesemeyer, then it is an upgraded fence from what was on there originally.

It came with a blade. So, that s a plus. No wrench. So, that s a minus.

I’ve found that the blade that comes on most used machines are usually trashed/well used, so yours may or may not be a ‘plus’. Finding blades for it will be a bit more difficult due to the arbor size, but they are out there. Not having a wrench is also a non-issue… any suitable sized box end wrench can be used, and if you don’t have one, keep an eye out at garage sales, pawn shops, flea markets and other places – you should be able to pick one up for cheap.

I believe it is currently set up for 3 phase. I do have 3 phase service to my shop (used to be a cabinet shop before we moved there). What s the best way to proceed with not getting electrocuted? Hire it done? Anyone here have any info on the wiring for these?

You can hire someone to hook it up, but it’s only 3 wires + a ground. If it runs in reverse when wired up, just sawp any two of the three wires anywhere between the power source and motor.

However, sometimes we regret taking old things apart.

I have never regretted doing a full tear down, ever. Not only does it allow you to find problems/issues you might have not otherwise found (until it was too late), but it allows you to intimately get to know the machine, how it’s put together and how it works – which is an advantage for further maintenance and keeping it in good operational condition.

Not really specific to your question, but if it were mine, I’d tear it apart and do a restoration on it. You don’t absolutely need to do a full restore, but at a minimum, new bearings (arbor and motor) and belts. While you have it apart, do a good cleaning, wax and lube and address any worn, missing or broken bits. If you want to go one step further, since you will have it apart anyway, a good de-rusting and painting would bring it back to like new. Those saw are over-designed and built to last several lifetimes.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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docboy

4 posts in 418 days


#4 posted 10-26-2016 04:08 PM

Thanks, Brad.

What types of lube/wax do you recommend? Any particular places to use wax instead of oil? Any particular places to NOT use lube on? When I was a kid, I use to pretty much coat my bike in wd40. Apparently, that’s not such a good thing.

What do you recommend for de-rusting?

I’ll post some pictures of the fence this weekend, hopefully.

Thanks for the advice.

—John

View unbob's profile

unbob

800 posts in 1741 days


#5 posted 10-26-2016 09:24 PM

I have one that was made in 1968. as I remember the the saw weighs 950lbs. A nice feature is it has changeable stub arbors, so blades from 5/8” hole to 1 1/4” can be used.
The table comes off with removing a bolt at each corner—mark the locations of any spacer washers so as to return them to the proper place for the table to be true when the blade is tilted.
like a Unisaw, just bigger.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

9628 posts in 3485 days


#6 posted 10-26-2016 10:00 PM

Buy, borrow or rent an engine hoist.

950lbs isn’t too heavy as machines go, but remove
extraneous parts like table wings.

I have both an engine hoist and a pallet jack and
I’ve lifted a 1 ton table saw on that hoist… only just
off the ground admittedly to get 4×4s under it,
but the hoist did it, with the top on.

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

6002 posts in 2036 days


#7 posted 10-26-2016 10:00 PM

You generally don’t want to use any kind of oil on the machine as it attracts crap and gunks up the works. A good dry lube or paraffin wax works fine and won’t attract stuff. Give any machined surface (ie: trunnions) and gear wear points a good cleaning and lube. Use paste wax on the cast iron machined surfaces (ie: table top and extension wings).

De-rusting can be accomplished a zillion different ways from electrolysis to sandpaper. Evaporust and electrolysis are probably the least destructive methods, followed by the various acid concoctions (citric, phosphoric, etc…) and then you have the most destructive methods such as wire brushes in a drill or angle grinder, sand blasting, sand paper, etc…

I love evaporust, but you can’t use it on really large stuff..

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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unbob

800 posts in 1741 days


#8 posted 10-26-2016 10:28 PM

I moved mine into my basement!
I removed the top, handwheels and the really heavy motor. Two guys can get it in a pickup that way, without extra equipment.
I wax the top with paste wax, use a dry film waxy spray “chainlube” on the worms, racks and other parts.
Try spraying the top with something like WD40, and scrape the rust off with a razor blade, maybe a little scotch bright—then wax it and use the machine often—-the top will take on a nice patina “above”, and not look like an idiot with a sander went after it.

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docboy

4 posts in 418 days


#9 posted 10-26-2016 10:37 PM

Thanks, Unbob.

I was about to ask about using a sander. I’ve got the idiot part down pat.

View unbob's profile

unbob

800 posts in 1741 days


#10 posted 10-26-2016 10:51 PM

The saw is really versatile, I have used blades from 7 1/2” for slitting thin hardwood, to 14” rip blade cutting 5” thick local black walnut. with great results. A 12” Forret dado stack is awesome when spun up !

View unbob's profile

unbob

800 posts in 1741 days


#11 posted 10-27-2016 12:25 AM

I did not have to further take the saw apart, it was in good running shape. You should check out the OWWM site, there are many threads on rebuilding these saws. I linked a manual for you here-
http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1141/533.pdf

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