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Any ideas of type of wood

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Forum topic by hhair posted 10-25-2016 08:10 PM 622 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hhair

10 posts in 413 days


10-25-2016 08:10 PM

I am tearing down a very old house early 1900’s or earlier. We are going to use the wood for our flooring in our house. Any idea what type of wood this might be? I know some of it is old heart pine. But there is different wood species in the house. These pictures may not help. We have not done anything to them but pressure washer them. The house is from South Ga.
This first picture is the wood on the wall of the house. The second picture is the wood waiting to be pressure washed. The third is after pressure washing.


20 replies so far

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

295 posts in 619 days


#1 posted 10-25-2016 09:23 PM

I’ve seen everything from Rock Maple to Am. Chestnut for flooring…I’m not too familiar with the trees of the south though (I live in the upper midwest), but that looks like heart pine

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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WDHLT15

1695 posts in 2310 days


#2 posted 10-26-2016 02:02 AM

It is either pine or cypress. Looks more like pine. Look at a clean slice of the end grain cut clean with a razor knife. Use a magnifying glass. Pine will have distinct resin canals. Cypress will have none. Here is some info on what resins canals are so that you can know what to look for.

http://www.faculty.sfasu.edu/mcbroommatth/lectures/wood_science/lab_2_resin_canal_species.pdf

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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firefighterontheside

16905 posts in 1690 days


#3 posted 10-26-2016 02:10 AM

Looking at the grain on the wall and the color of it when wet, I would say definitely say heart pine. Most likely long leaf pine, but could also be loblolly.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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hhair

10 posts in 413 days


#4 posted 10-26-2016 02:12 AM

Thank y’all so much. It is a job but very rewarding especially after its cleaned up. I know some of it is heart pine. Its actually what we call fat lighter. It has a very distinctive smell to it. But these boards did not have the same smell of one cracked. So I have been unsure of its type.

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hhair

10 posts in 413 days


#5 posted 10-26-2016 02:17 AM

This is kinda off this particular subject but any ideas how we could lay it for flooring but keep the old patina and saw marks without changing color as well. Oh yeah and not having splinters. I know that’s a lot to ask but maybe y’all would know some secrets I don’t.

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firefighterontheside

16905 posts in 1690 days


#6 posted 10-26-2016 02:28 AM

I live in a log home I built. To clean the logs and get ready for the finish I used this brush on an angle grinder. It takes off the grim, but doesn’t remove wood unless you really push it. It will remove the splinters, but leave the saw marks. I used it to keep the draw knife marks on the logs. It will last forever. Mine is still good after 17 years. It will be a lot of work though. You should consider machining the bottom flat in a planer. Cut the pieces to uniform width and tongue and groove.
http://www.loghelp.com/products/osborn-buffing-brushes.asp

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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hhair

10 posts in 413 days


#7 posted 10-26-2016 02:37 AM

Firefighterontheside you don’t think it will be to abrasive for pine? Its a softer wood and I know it dents easily not sure about how it will do on the surface. This is my first attempt at anything like this.

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firefighterontheside

16905 posts in 1690 days


#8 posted 10-26-2016 03:11 AM

My house is red pine, which is no doubt softer than that old heart pine. The fiber brush is plastic bristles with some abrasives imbedded in them. If you set the speed very high then it can take off some wood, but at a lower speed you’re safe. That said, it does require an adjustable speed grinder.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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firefighterontheside

16905 posts in 1690 days


#9 posted 10-26-2016 03:15 AM

I just took this picture of my logs. You can see the facets where the draw knife marks are. The brush leaves these facets intact. You have to pay attention to what direction the thing is spinning and and line it up with the wood.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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hhair

10 posts in 413 days


#10 posted 10-26-2016 03:19 AM

Thank you i will have to try it on a spare piece and see what it’ll do. Yours looks great by the way.

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firefighterontheside

16905 posts in 1690 days


#11 posted 10-26-2016 03:25 AM

You might wait around and see if somebody else has another idea, but about anything lose is gonna take off a whole layer of wood. It’s not cheap, but it will last a long time. Good luck.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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hhair

10 posts in 413 days


#12 posted 10-26-2016 03:38 AM

I will wait and see if anyone else has some ideas. I don’t mind spending money on something that will get rid of the splinters but keep the old look I want. The old house was given to me and there is enough wood to do all my floors plus some so I feel pretty blessed and if I have to spend a little money its still way less than i would have spent ordering the flooring.

View Gaffneylumber's profile

Gaffneylumber

98 posts in 662 days


#13 posted 10-26-2016 03:52 AM

I like the idea of keeping the saw marks but wonder if it will be a magnet for dirt and grit making sweeping tougher. I would run them through a drum sander and get them mostly smooth to the point where there are still some shallow saw marks here and there. Just be prepared though that this stuff will gum up paper quick. I grew up in a house with heart pine floors and they are beautiful.

-- Grayson - South Carolina

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hhair

10 posts in 413 days


#14 posted 10-26-2016 11:26 AM

Gaffneylumber I am going to do a light sanding over it I do know that but I am trying to keep it as close to what it is now color and all. I am of course going to put something over it(poly, tongue oil) something along those lines just not sure what yet because I don’t want it to darken any. If I get a chance ill post some pictures of what I am really wanting it to look like and y’all can all chime in and tell me what you think will get me there. As far as a dirt magnet, I have oak floors now and they are all a dirt magnet around my house. Ha

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1499 posts in 1221 days


#15 posted 10-26-2016 12:52 PM

You might try planing or sanding smooth one side of a board to see what the grain looks like. It will help you ID the wood but if it is old growth anything from around 1900, the grain will probably be amazing and will seem like a waste to hide that under a rough weathered surface. This will also make it easier to put a nice hard finish on it since it will be a floor.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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