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CBN wheels/sharpening in general

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Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 10-25-2016 02:11 AM 2085 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gixxerjoe04

850 posts in 1417 days


10-25-2016 02:11 AM

Since I’m finally going getting into traditional turning, going to have to buy sharpening stuff, which really sucks when you look at the prices haha. Seeing how CBN wheels is the way to go, thought about getting at least one of them but possibly two. Hoping the rikon grinder is will be on sale sooner, figure it would be around black friday, will probably end up getting it. Thought about just getting the 350 grit cbn wheel and using the 120 grit wheel that comes with the grinder. Was curious, with having a 350 grit cbn wheel, how often would i even need to use the lower grit stone wheel? Unless I needed to reshape something, of course being new into traditional tools, reshaping stuff probably won’t be happening I wouldn’t think for awhile. Also, getting tools that come already sharp and I assume ready to go(Thompson tools), didn’t know how badly I’d need a lower grit wheel. So basically my rambling, should I splurge and get two cbn wheels, 180-350, or save some money and just get the 350 and use the stone 120 grit when I need to? Thoughts or suggestions? Was also wondering if there was a better bang for your buck jig over the wolverine, or is that the way to go?


22 replies so far

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TheDane

5334 posts in 3503 days


#1 posted 10-25-2016 02:20 AM

I have 2 CBN wheels … 80-grit for shaping a tool, and 180-grit for sharpening.

I’m sure there are others who will take issue with me on this, but I have never understood the need for anything finer than 180-grit.

I wrote this review ( http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3742 ) almost three years ago … still feel the same today.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Gixxerjoe04

850 posts in 1417 days


#2 posted 10-25-2016 02:30 AM

That’s the company I planned on buying from. Looking around online seemed to be some people thinking the grits I planned on buying was best while others thought what you do. I have no clue, but since the prices are the same either way, doesn’t really matter to me just want to make sure I pick the best set up. One guy said using the 350 grit wheel makes it sharper and stay sharper longer, which is why I figured I should go that route haha

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2784 days


#3 posted 10-25-2016 03:51 AM

I have a four wheel system. One wheel is a diamond and another is a stock disposable to handle carbides. The remaining two are CBN’s. One is a six inch, 80 grit and the other is an eight inch, 180 grit wheel.

Now that I’ve played with them, I’d, definitely, go with the eight inch wheels. That said, I believe, once I’m happy with the profile of a given knife, I’d like to take off as little HSS as possible. As such, I’d, probably, have gone with a 220 for my fine wheel.

NOTES:

(1) I pulled the 1,700 RPM, 220 motor off my four wheel system and replaced it with a 3/4 horse, DC sewing machine motor and controller. That allows me to both vary the speed from zero to about twenty-five hundred RPM and to reverse the direction for buffing.

For sharpening, I drop it to a few hundred RPM and quickly touch up edges without removing much material. Too, on top of the already much cooler running of the CBN’s, the slower speed often lets me touch the blade tip without fear of a burn.

(2) I got my eight inch wheel from this guy and am very happy with it:

http://www.arizonasilhouette.com/category/sharpening-grinding.html

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jeff

1059 posts in 3305 days


#4 posted 10-25-2016 04:15 AM

I followed Gerry’s review and purchased the same.I’m very happy with the CBN wheels.Ken at Wood Turners Wonders answered a few questions via email before I purchased-he was quick to respond.No more out of round and truing the wheels.I would never go back to the old wheels.I have the Wolverine set up also and its been great—easy to set up and use.I have no regrets with these purchases and would buy again.I have some Thompson tools.Thompsons come sharp but will need to be resharpened at some time-180 grit is fine for that.But you will need the 80 grit to reshape to a different bevel grind if desired.Thompsons are pricey and if your learning how to sharpen I would recommend another less expensive tool.BB’s from Pen State industries is what I have been using to try a few different bevel grinds ect.

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

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Rick_M

10646 posts in 2220 days


#5 posted 10-25-2016 06:14 AM

I have a Powertec 8” slow speed grinder, is that alright to run CBN wheels? Or am I wasting money buying expensive wheels for a lower end grinder?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2784 days


#6 posted 10-25-2016 06:19 AM

Rick, its wheels turn, so it’ll work.

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Fred Hargis

4771 posts in 2333 days


#7 posted 10-25-2016 11:46 AM

I have one of the Powertec 8” grinders as well. the question I’ve had is are the CBN wheels too thick to fit the arbor. It look like they are 1.5”, adn there is just a fraction over that (I think) on the Powertec.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Gixxerjoe04

850 posts in 1417 days


#8 posted 10-25-2016 12:31 PM



I followed Gerry s review and purchased the same.I m very happy with the CBN wheels.Ken at Wood Turners Wonders answered a few questions via email before I purchased-he was quick to respond.No more out of round and truing the wheels.I would never go back to the old wheels.I have the Wolverine set up also and its been great—easy to set up and use.I have no regrets with these purchases and would buy again.I have some Thompson tools.Thompsons come sharp but will need to be resharpened at some time-180 grit is fine for that.But you will need the 80 grit to reshape to a different bevel grind if desired.Thompsons are pricey and if your learning how to sharpen I would recommend another less expensive tool.BB s from Pen State industries is what I have been using to try a few different bevel grinds ect.

- jeff

I plan on asking at my local turning club if anyone has any spare tools they’re looking to sell cheap, if not I’ll probably pick up a couple cheap ones. Also plan on getting help from a member on how to sharpen properly and use them correctly, but sharpening doesn’t look that hard after watching tons of videos, using them on the other hand still does haha. So can you not reshape a tool on a 180 grit cbn wheel? Figured you could, would just take longer.

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TheDane

5334 posts in 3503 days


#9 posted 10-25-2016 12:45 PM

So can you not reshape a tool on a 180 grit cbn wheel? Figured you could, would just take longer.

Sure you can … just depends on whether you want to spend your time standing at the grinder or turning on the lathe!

Which is one of the reasons I don’t see the point in finder grit wheels … it takes longer to sharpen your tools and you produce a finer edge that (IMNTBH opinion) is more delicate and will dull faster.

That’s why I went with the 80/180 combination of wheels. The 80-grit is aggressive enough I can re-shape a tool quickly, and the 180-grit gives me a nice sharp edge quickly so I can get back to makin’ shavins’!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Bruyet

40 posts in 983 days


#10 posted 10-25-2016 02:48 PM

Love my 180 CBN wheel. I honestly don’t know what I’d do without it.

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Gixxerjoe04

850 posts in 1417 days


#11 posted 10-25-2016 04:03 PM

Got another curious question, they sell 6” cbn wheels, I have a 6” skil grinder, not a slow speed though, would that not work?

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TheDane

5334 posts in 3503 days


#12 posted 10-25-2016 04:23 PM

Got another curious question, they sell 6” cbn wheels, I have a 6” skil grinder, not a slow speed though, would that not work?

- Gixxerjoe04

Probably would work. Your grinder is probably 3450rpm (high speed), but if you are careful, I don’t see why it wouldn’t work (my grinders are both 1725rpm w/8” wheels).

A 6” wheel will result in more of a hollow in your grind, but a lot of turners are using 6” grinders with friable wheels and get okay results.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Leo Van Der Loo's profile

Leo Van Der Loo

45 posts in 598 days


#13 posted 10-25-2016 05:36 PM

If seconds in your life are very important and expensive tool steel is not so much, than coarse grit wheels and/or high speed grinders is your answer.

For me as I learned to sharpen HSS metal turning tools on carborundum wheel, I still do that.

I don’t have exotic steel tools that have carbide particles in them, so no need for exotic grinding wheel.

I love turning and it has been a hobby for better than half a century, sharpening my quality HSS turning tools does probably take 1 or 2 seconds longer , but the tools get sharp enough to turn wood just fine, and enjoyment is all I need out of turning, it is not a race to get done with it, just my way of looking at it ;-)

-- Have fun and take care

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Kelly

1821 posts in 2784 days


#14 posted 10-29-2016 01:32 AM

The only reason for the guards is to protect you from exploding wheels. CBNs won’t do that, so you can install the 1-1/2” wheels without the guards.


I have one of the Powertec 8” grinders as well. the question I ve had is are the CBN wheels too thick to fit the arbor. It look like they are 1.5”, adn there is just a fraction over that (I think) on the Powertec.

- Fred Hargis


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Leo Van Der Loo

45 posts in 598 days


#15 posted 10-30-2016 04:05 AM



I have one of the Powertec 8” grinders as well. the question I ve had is are the CBN wheels too thick to fit the arbor. It look like they are 1.5”, adn there is just a fraction over that (I think) on the Powertec.

- Fred Hargis

The CBN are quite a bit heavier than the friable wheels, you need more HP for them to spin up.

The hubs of the wheels have to seat up square agains a shoulder, and the arbor length than has to be long enough to have the nut threaded on, some grinders do not have a machined shoulder, so that will be a problem.

Also do not grind mild steel on a CBN wheel, as it will plug up the surface.

Just as a diamond wheel will loose the diamond if grinding steel with it.

-- Have fun and take care

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