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Forum topic by Joe Weaver posted 07-08-2010 09:40 PM 1384 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joe Weaver

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07-08-2010 09:40 PM

8 replies so far

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SCOTSMAN

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#1 posted 07-08-2010 11:08 PM

The scriptures according to Fox news eh? well there is an articulate,impartial bunch of well educated know it alls,if ever I needed a laugh, we get it here it’s a hoot to watch their unbridled display of fair reporting.He He .Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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GMman

3902 posts in 3158 days


#2 posted 07-08-2010 11:25 PM

Guilty pleas set stage for U.S.-Russia spy swap

08/07/2010 4:26:06 PM

CTV.ca News Staff
Ten people accused of being Russian spies embedded in the U.S. have told a federal judge they are pleading guilty.

The pleas are believed to be the first step in an exchange described as the largest U.S.-Russia spy swap since the Cold War.

On Thursday afternoon, two White House sources said that four Americans would be freed from Russia as part of the deal.

Defence lawyers for the alleged spies have said they expect their clients to be sent home later today.

The FBI made the arrests late last month, alleging that the 10 had been living double lives, secretly working for Moscow for years to collect information about business, scientific and political affairs.

One other suspect in the U.S. spy case was arrested in Cyprus, but was granted bail and promptly vanished.

Meanwhile, a Russian convicted of spying for the U.S reportedly removed from prison and flown to Vienna on Thursday.

In Moscow the family of Igor Sutyagin—a nuclear researcher serving a 14-year sentence for allegedly spying for the Americans—says he is on a list of 11 Russian prisoners who could be set free in the swap.

His lawyer, Anna Stavitskaya, said a journalist phoned the family to say Sutyagin was spotted in Vienna, getting off a plane.

Earlier, a number of armoured vehicles were seen driving in and out of the prison where Sutyagin was housed, believed to be the home of a number of other convicted spies.

Sutyagin previously worked as an arms control and military analyst at the U.S.A. and Canada Institute in Moscow. He was arrested in 1999 and convicted five years later of passing nuclear secrets to a British company that Russian investigators say is linked to the CIA.

The spy case made headlines around the world, with the arrests coming days after Moscow President Dmitry Medvedev and U.S. President Barack Obama had a high-profile burger lunch in Washington and later attended the G8 and G20 meetings in Ontario.

Yesterday, the U.S. brought half of the captured spy suspects to New York, joining the other five who were already behind bars there. The suspected spies will have to plead guilty to charges if they are to be deported.

High-level negotiations have taken place at the Washington home of the Russian ambassador and experts say there are few barriers that would prevent such a swap from occurring.

“A swap seems very much on the cards. There is political will on both sides, and actually by even moving it as far as they have, Moscow has de facto acknowledged that these guys were spies,” intelligence analyst Pavel Felgenhauer said.

Martin Rudner, the director of Carleton University’s Canadian Centre of Intelligence and Security Studies, said it is less trouble for both sides to engineer a swap, rather than fight the issues in court.

From the American perspective, there are many good reasons not to air out their dirty laundry in the court system.

“To bring them to trial, United States authorities would have to disclose, for example, what was the American tradecraft which detected the spy-ring, and of course, the United States doesn’t want to disclose this in open court, lest the Russians and others learn about American spycraft, or counterintelligence methods,” he told CTV’s Canada AM during a telephone interview from Ottawa on Thursday morning.

The Americans would also not want to have to reveal the type of information they had been feeding to the Russian spy-ring, while they watched it over much of the past decade.

Moscow has also traditionally favoured bringing its agents home when possible.

“The Russians, like the Americans, have a tendency to want to bring their people home,” former CIA Russian analyst Mark Stout told ABC News.

During the Cold War, dozens of similar swaps took place—the last example involving the U.S. and Russia took place on the Glienecke Bridge between East and West Berlin.

With files from The Associated Press and CTV’s Joy Malbon

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GMman

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#3 posted 07-08-2010 11:27 PM

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Joe Weaver

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#4 posted 07-08-2010 11:33 PM

I’m sorry I cut and pasted the wrong page.

Look at the face book link.
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Gustus-Bozarth-for-President/130793733625178?ref=search

-- Joe, Ga

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GMman

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#5 posted 07-08-2010 11:44 PM

Largest U.S.-Russian spy swap in decades in motion
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The Associated Press

Published: July 8, 2010

Updated: 4 min. ago

NEW YORK – The largest spy swap between the U.S. and Russia since the Cold War unfolded today as 10 people accused of spying in suburban America pleaded guilty to conspiracy and were ordered deported to Russia in exchange for the release of four Russian spies.

The defendants pleaded guilty in a Manhattan courtroom, were immediately sentenced to time served and were ordered deported. They were expected to be sent to Russia within hours, and U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood announced that the Russian government would release four people to the United States in exchange.

The swap carries significant consequences for efforts between Washington and Moscow to repair ties chilled by a deepening atmosphere of suspicion.

The defendants each announced their pleas to conspiracy to act as an unregistered agent of a foreign country. Some spoke with heavy Russian accents, sometimes in broken English, despite having spent years living in the U.S. posing as American and Canadian citizens.

An 11th defendant was a fugitive after he fled authorities in Cyprus following his release on bail.

The defendants provided almost no information about what kind of spying they actually did for Russia. Asked to describe their crimes, each acknowledged having worked for Russia secretly, sometimes under an assumed identity, without registering as a foreign agent.

Defendant Anna Chapman mentioned she had communicated with a Russian official via a wireless signal, sent from her laptop. Asked by the judge whether she realized at the time that her actions were criminal, she said, “Yes I did, your honor.”

The arrests occurred more than a week ago, capping a decade-plus investigation. Authorities said the defendants were reporting what they learned in the U.S. to Russian officials.

Defendant Richard Murphy acknowledged that from the mid-1990s to the present day, he lived in the U.S. under an assumed name and took directions from the Russian Federation.

Asked whether he knew his actions were a crime, he said:

“I knew they were illegal, yes, your honor.”

One person familiar with the plea negotiations told the AP that most of the defendants expected to be going home to Russia later Thursday. The person was not authorized to publicly discuss the matter in advance of the plea and spoke on condition of anonymity.

“It’s a resolution that will put this thing behind him as quickly as we can arrange it,” said Peter Krupp, an attorney for defendant Donald Heathfield, before the hearing.

Igor Sutyagin, a Russian arms control analyst convicted of spying for the United States, was reportedly plucked from a Moscow prison and flown to Vienna earlier today.

Sutyagin, a Russian arms control analyst serving a 14-year sentenced for spying for the United States, had told his relatives he was going to be among spies in Russia who would be freed in exchange for 11 people charged in the United States with being Russian agents. They said he was going to be sent to Vienna, then London.

In Moscow, his lawyer, Anna Stavitskaya, said a journalist called Igor Sutyagin’s family to inform them that Sutyagin was seen walking off a plane in Vienna on Thursday. However, she told the AP she couldn’t get confirmation of that claim from Russian authorities.

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GMman

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#6 posted 07-09-2010 01:27 AM

Judge orders Russian spies deported from U.S.

08/07/2010 6:06:26 PM

CTV.ca News Staff
Ten people accused of being Russian spies embedded in the U.S. have been ordered deported from the country, in exchange for the release of four spies by the Kremlin.

U.S. Federal Judge Kimba Wood ordered the deportations Thursday afternoon, after the 10 defendants pleaded guilty to spying for Russia.

They will likely be escorted from the country later on Thursday, in what is being called the largest exchange of spies between the U.S. and Russia since the Cold War.

The group had been spying on the United States for more than a decade before being taken into custody by U.S. authorities. The FBI made the arrests late last month, alleging that the 10 had been living double lives, secretly working for Moscow for years to collect information about business, scientific and political affairs.

Another suspect in the U.S. spy case, Christopher Metsos, was arrested in Cyprus but was granted bail and promptly vanished. Metsos reportedly assumed the identity of a Canadian boy, who died at age 5, to secure a passport for his escape.

U.S. investigators said that one suspect also adopted the identity of a deceased Canadian infant named Donald Heathfield.

The Department of Foreign Affairs in Ottawa has declined to comment on the cases.

Meanwhile, a Russian convicted of spying for the U.S was reportedly removed from prison and flown to Vienna on Thursday.

In Moscow the family of Igor Sutyagin—a nuclear researcher serving a 14-year sentence for allegedly spying for the Americans—says he is on a list of 11 Russian prisoners who could be set free in the swap.

His lawyer, Anna Stavitskaya, said a journalist phoned the family to say Sutyagin was spotted in Vienna, getting off a plane.

Earlier, a number of armoured vehicles were seen driving in and out of the prison where Sutyagin was housed, believed to be the home of a number of other convicted spies.

Sutyagin previously worked as an arms control and military analyst at the U.S.A. and Canada Institute in Moscow. He was arrested in 1999 and convicted five years later of passing nuclear secrets to a British company that Russian investigators say is linked to the CIA.

The spy case made headlines around the world, with the arrests coming days after Moscow President Dmitry Medvedev and U.S. President Barack Obama had a high-profile burger lunch in Washington and later attended the G8 and G20 meetings in Ontario.

Yesterday, the U.S. brought half of the captured spy suspects to New York, joining the other five who were already behind bars there. The suspected spies will have to plead guilty to charges if they are to be deported.

High-level negotiations have taken place at the Washington home of the Russian ambassador and experts say there are few barriers that would prevent such a swap from occurring.

“A swap seems very much on the cards. There is political will on both sides, and actually by even moving it as far as they have, Moscow has de facto acknowledged that these guys were spies,” intelligence analyst Pavel Felgenhauer said.

Martin Rudner, the director of Carleton University’s Canadian Centre of Intelligence and Security Studies, said it is less trouble for both sides to engineer a swap, rather than fight the issues in court.

From the American perspective, there are many good reasons not to air out their dirty laundry in the court system.

“To bring them to trial, United States authorities would have to disclose, for example, what was the American tradecraft which detected the spy-ring, and of course, the United States doesn’t want to disclose this in open court, lest the Russians and others learn about American spycraft, or counterintelligence methods,” he told CTV’s Canada AM during a telephone interview from Ottawa on Thursday morning.

The Americans would also not want to have to reveal the type of information they had been feeding to the Russian spy-ring, while they watched it over much of the past decade.

Moscow has also traditionally favoured bringing its agents home when possible.

“The Russians, like the Americans, have a tendency to want to bring their people home,” former CIA Russian analyst Mark Stout told ABC News.

During the Cold War, dozens of similar swaps took place—the last example involving the U.S. and Russia took place on the Glienecke Bridge between East and West Berlin.

With files from The Associated Press and CTV’s Joy Malbon

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GMman

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#7 posted 07-09-2010 01:28 AM

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#8 posted 07-09-2010 01:29 AM

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