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Rough Topcoat Finish

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Forum topic by WoodScrap posted 10-20-2016 06:00 PM 1037 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodScrap

102 posts in 3233 days


10-20-2016 06:00 PM

Hello all,

I recently built a dresser for my New Grandaughter and my Daughter asked that it be painted. While I have stained and finished many wood projects I had never painted new wood (sacrilege). To avoid brush strokes I purchased a spray gun and the costs went on well except that there was a lot of overspray causing the surfaces to be rough to the touch. I sanded with 320 between each coat which worked well (a lot of work) but have now come to the final coat. My question is how best to remove the roughness without leaving the surface scratched and dull form the sanding? I had thought about using 600 grit now and then buffing by hand to restore the gloss but I’m not sure if this would work or if there is a better way.

I used Valspar Latex Enamel Satin. Hopefully as I gain experience with the spray system I will get better.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Rick

-- Rick -Tulsa


11 replies so far

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

2143 posts in 3707 days


#1 posted 10-20-2016 06:10 PM

its very difficult to get a latex paint to lay out super smooth, the best thing to do is to give it a 320 scuff sand to smooth and use a clear water base over the top, will also make it more durable, Latex is overly thick, a clear will be thinner and level better

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

973 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 10-20-2016 06:50 PM

nt

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5466 posts in 2650 days


#3 posted 10-20-2016 07:07 PM

I agree with Mr. Neil on this one, Latex is not the best for furniture. Colored lacquer is another option (there are actually many good options).

But since your here now, just thin the final coat with water. Make sure your tip is the right size for latex (usually 1.8 to 2.5). Then you can topcoat with clear if desired.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8301 posts in 1323 days


#4 posted 10-20-2016 07:21 PM

Hard to get latex to spray well. The worst that has happened to me is I thinned it a bit too much and it came out matte instead of semi gloss but it was still smooth.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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WoodScrap

102 posts in 3233 days


#5 posted 10-20-2016 07:33 PM

Thanks.

I had read in “Spray Finishing Made Simple” by Jewel that Latex (100% Acrylic) was fine for furniture, and the paint itself says made for furniture, so I thought I was OK. Lesson Learned!

I thinned the latex with 4 oz of distilled water and 3 oz of Floetrol per quart . I had a 2.0mm tip and it seemed to spray fine but had a little texture to it. What I think I am experiencing is overspray as much as anything. The flat drawer fronts aren’t too bad (some texture) but where I am spraying inside surfaces and vertical surfaces the build up is pretty noticeable.

I’ll try a sample board with a clear topcoat of Polyacrylic and see how that looks before applying to the dresser.

-- Rick -Tulsa

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2562 posts in 2005 days


#6 posted 10-20-2016 07:50 PM

A couple of years ago I have made my own kitchen. Four dours are made from MDF and coated with a high gloss alkyd paint. All painting layers where done with a roller. I don.t have a spray gun. It was very difficult to get an acceptable result. I started with some layers of undercoat. Between each layer I sanded. Wet sandpaper 400 grit. Then I started painting with the top layers. After each layer I waited at least three days before sanding. I can’t remember the grit but that must be also 600. Problem for me was that sometimes there where some dust enclosures (I hope I use the right word. What I mean is that there was dust in the dryed paint) I did more than 4 layers. After the last layer I waited 1 week before sanding. I sanded with a orbital sander 6” and at low speed to avoid burning marks. Started with 400 and ended with 2000 Mirka abralon (european scale) after 2000 it was very smooth but also very matt/dull. After this was done I polisched with a polishing machine 8”. After all this work I was satisfied with the result. Would I do it again? Probably not. I also have to mention that the doors are 100% flat. The benefit of doing it myself is that I now know something about high gloss painting and the excuse to buy a orbital sander and a polish machine.

I.m sure that when the paint is done with a gun it is easier. But believe me still a lot of work.

Success.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4757 posts in 2330 days


#7 posted 10-20-2016 07:53 PM

100% acrylic should be fine, I’ve used a fair amount and found it very durable as well. Generally “latex” refers to wall paint, which is only good for walls. I’m not sure what to suggest, but try this while you are experimenting. Take a sample piece with the rough surface and rub it with a wad of kraft paper (like brown paper grocery bag). I’ve done this with clear finishes and got the roughness out without damaging the look of the finish. I’ve not tried it with paint, but it might save you some steps.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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WoodScrap

102 posts in 3233 days


#8 posted 10-26-2016 06:45 PM

Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

For those of you who have sprayed PolyAcrylic, should I use Floetrol and thin with water like the latex (Acrylic) paint or just thin with water? I am concerned that Floetrol may make the clear finish milky.

Thanks again,

-- Rick -Tulsa

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1281 posts in 1051 days


#9 posted 10-26-2016 07:20 PM

I have have had success with using Behr interior flat with a primer for a base color coat (3 coats) diluted with distilled water to shoot with my 3 stage turbine HVLP – it then produces a nice easy finish to sand out “base” color. Now you have something like a milk paint finish. This method similar to a milk paint and both require top coats or protection. The options for me in furniture are satin or semi-gloss. When dealing with a semi or gloss I have to go to a 2000 to 4000 grit rub out to bring it to a glossy finish.
The problem that I had with enamel and epoxy paint- it could not be diluted. And if you want to spray it you need an expensive spay gun such as a Titon or a 4-5 stage turbine and gun with a 1.8 to a 2.5 spray tip.

-- Desert_Woodworker

View jbay's profile

jbay

1857 posts in 736 days


#10 posted 10-26-2016 09:36 PM

I hate Floetrol myself.
I use mostly pressure pots for all my spraying. (yes, I’m a little old fashion I guess)

Finishing has a lot of variables that are hard to explain. You have air pressure,(atomization) pot pressure, fan control,
material output, spraying speed and overlapping while spraying.
All combined with material that has a certain viscosity.
What makes for a good finish is being able to manipulate all those variables into a system that works.
Experience is what you have to have to make all the right adjustments. It’s pretty hard to tell somebody how to do it on the internet.

Your technique has as big of an influence as your material.

I just painted some cabinets with some Dunn Edwards “Aristoshield” Water-Based Urethane Alkyd.
I was very happy with how well the paint laid down. Comparable to a lacquer finish in my opinion.
Though, I still had to experiment with a few different viscosity’s and air atomization adjustments.
Practice and samples!

I guess my point is that you have to try different mixtures, different air pressures, different spraying techniques,
(speed and overlapping) until you find the one that works best for you. It sounds to me like your not keeping a wet enough edge as your overlapping. Try overlapping a little more, and maybe a little thinner on the paint and throw away the Floetrol.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

299 posts in 680 days


#11 posted 10-27-2016 04:20 PM



I have have had success with using Behr interior flat with a primer for a base color coat (3 coats) diluted with distilled water to shoot with my 3 stage turbine HVLP – it then produces a nice easy finish to sand out “base” color. Now you have something like a milk paint finish. This method similar to a milk paint and both require top coats or protection. The options for me in furniture are satin or semi-gloss. When dealing with a semi or gloss I have to go to a 2000 to 4000 grit rub out to bring it to a glossy finish.
The problem that I had with enamel and epoxy paint- it could not be diluted. And if you want to spray it you need an expensive spay gun such as a Titon or a 4-5 stage turbine and gun with a 1.8 to a 2.5 spray tip.

- Desert_Woodworker

I painted with GF “Milk paint” which is a very good imitation. When I top coated the black finish with a satin water borne acrylic the dulling agent made it look a milky gray. I settled on semi-gloss which retained the deep black appearance.

So for darker colors I recommend that a test sample be made before doing the actual topcoat to determine if the dulling agents will have an adverse effect on the appearance of the finish.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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