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Which ts for fine work. Small projects?

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Forum topic by Hard_as_Wood posted 10-20-2016 04:03 AM 887 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hard_as_Wood

28 posts in 1082 days


10-20-2016 04:03 AM

I want to build small side tables and small items for the wall. Etc. what ts should I get for something like that?

-- Ciao!


15 replies so far

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1366 posts in 1061 days


#1 posted 10-25-2016 01:26 AM

HardasWood,

One might think that a small inexpensive table saw would be good for small projects. While a smaller inexpensive table saws will do the job, I personally believe that a better table saw can be easier to use and produce better results with less frustration, no matter the project. Based on my personal bias, I believe the greatest value would be achieved from the best table saw your budget will support.

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1594 days


#2 posted 10-25-2016 01:56 AM

PROXXON makes a 4” model makers saw that is small, portable. and precise.

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8085 posts in 2939 days


#3 posted 10-25-2016 12:02 PM

+1 JBrow, unfortunately ….. he’s absolutely right.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2789 posts in 2437 days


#4 posted 10-25-2016 12:19 PM

A sliding miter saw and a track saw/circular saw with clamping straightedge would do what you need as well. and you could use the space a table saw takes up for an assembly table.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 788 days


#5 posted 10-25-2016 01:11 PM


I want to build small side tables and small items for the wall. Etc. what ts should I get for something like that?

- HardasWood

Not many … start with these:

  1. combination square
  2. sliding bevel
  3. scratch awl
  4. marking knife
  5. tape measure
  6. crosscut hand saw
  7. rip hand saw
  8. dovetail saw
  9. coping saw
10. block plane
11. chisel set (1”, 3/4”, 1/2”, 1/4”)
12. small claw hammer
13. wooden mallet
14. honing guide
15. sharpening stone
16. phillips screw driver
17. flat screw driver
18. pliers
19. adjustable wrench
20. Hand drill (manual)
21. drill bit set

... anything else is just luxury!

———————————————————-

SORRY! I mistook “ts” for tools … duh!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6237 posts in 1279 days


#6 posted 10-25-2016 01:51 PM

If you’re only doing small stuff, you may be better off with a bandsaw than a TS. A good bandsaw can resaw, rip and crosscut and can also do curves and detail work.

If a bandsaw isn’t sufficient, see JBrow and shipwright’s comments.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3789 days


#7 posted 10-25-2016 04:29 PM

The old Delta tilt-top units are very accurate for
joinery due to the fixed arbor. The old INCA tilt
tops are no longer as sought-after as they once
were (there’s a cool mortiser than attaches to the
side) and they are even more robust than the
Delta with, if memory serves, a 22mm bore and the
actual shaft is almost twice as thick. They run
with little vibration and the accessories are well
designed.

I use a printer’s slug saw for fine work. It doesn’t
tilt but it has some wicked cool features for holding
and stopping cuts on little pieces. It only makes
dead-square cuts though angles can be improvised
in the miter axis.

If you are really never going to process panels larger
than 4 sq. ft or so you don’t need a tilting-arbor saw,
imo. Small tilt-top saws also take up very little space.
I have one that rips up to 24” or so, a Kity made in
France… sort of a flimsier version of the INCA.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2521 days


#8 posted 10-25-2016 06:38 PM



PROXXON makes a 4” model makers saw that is small, portable. and precise.

- MadMark

Needs a baby Incra

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

6237 posts in 1279 days


#9 posted 10-25-2016 08:04 PM


Needs a baby Incra

- Rick M.

LMAO

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4696 posts in 853 days


#10 posted 10-25-2016 09:46 PM

I thought that little saw was a joke ….....it cost 400.00 …....LMAO

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2521 days


#11 posted 10-25-2016 10:08 PM

Oh yeah, Proxxon makes a bunch of tiny machinist and woodworking machines for model makers.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 732 days


#12 posted 10-25-2016 11:19 PM


A sliding miter saw and a track saw/circular saw with clamping straightedge would do what you need as well. and you could use the space a table saw takes up for an assembly table.
- dhazelton

I never felt a need in a miter saw. IMHO it is more suited to house renovation like installing crown moldings or floors than woodworking.

View Hard_as_Wood's profile

Hard_as_Wood

28 posts in 1082 days


#13 posted 10-25-2016 11:58 PM

I’m debating the circular saw and straight edge.

-- Ciao!

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12369 posts in 2521 days


#14 posted 10-26-2016 03:52 AM

I’ve been debating them for years but they are tough opponents and the facts are on their side.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2789 posts in 2437 days


#15 posted 10-26-2016 12:51 PM

“Small items for the wall” – what’s wrong with a sliding miter saw? They would excel at making little shelves, boxes, picture frames etc.

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